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It might help to leave out step 4, or make a copy of the XLS table and add that to QGIS instead of the original file. You can still make changes in Excel, and visualize them in QGIS. If you aim to change the data in QGIS, you might need an intermediate Excel file, and connect it to your file with formulas as external cell reference.


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Dealing with excel (CSV) and qgis is fairly easy with the use of MMQGIS here you can export import CSV files among other things. Hope this helps


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You can create a Python add-in tool that first allows a user to select features (including with a mouse), and then executes a piece of logic on the selection. See the tutorial for an add-in Tool. Any time you create an ArcPy search cursor on a layer, only the selected rows are returned. In combination, you will be able to select features with your mouse, ...


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You have coordinates in DMS (degree minute second) format, and need to get them into DD (decimal degree) to import easily into ArcMap. While in Excel, make a new column. This would be the formula to just convert from DMS to DD: degrees, plus minutes divided by 60, plus seconds divided by 3600. =MID([DMS], 2, 2)+(MID([DMS], 5, 2)/60)+(MID(A6, 8, 4)/3600) ...


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The following ESRI Knowledge Base artcile details the steps to turn your data from Excel into a shapefile. Hopefully you will find this is all you need. http://support.esri.com/en/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/27589 Note: You will have to convert your coordinates to decimal degrees. Following @Erica's comment, and indeed a re-reading of your ...


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If you use the Table to Table tool, which can import Excel files to geodatabase tables, you can manually set the data type of each field during the import process using the field map. Right-click the field you're having trouble with, click Properties, then change the type:


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Ok so maybe I was too hasty with my angst. I followed the CSV route found on this page and it worked fine. The frustration is still there however as to why you can't bring in an Excel sheet direct and retain the formatting.


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Can you try the converting the data in QGIS? or any other GIS software? this way you can make sure the problem really lies with ArcGIS rather than your data, and you have the shapefile to boot.


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Just clean your spreadsheet. Convert to table and do the steps you just did. You don't need to convert to MS Access if you do it right. You can follow this workflow like this question I answered not so long ago: http://gis.stackexchange.com/a/135684/34877


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You might try the plugin MMQGIS, which has geocoding functionality that will output a points shapefile. (You may have to add a COUNTRY column to your XLS file, as well as reproject the output points to your project's CRS.) You could then spatially join the MMQGIS points with building shapefiles you already have.


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This page http://www.vermessung-und-ortung-mit-satelliten.de/datumstrans.html leads you to two excel sheets that do the conversion you want: http://www.vermessung-und-ortung-mit-satelliten.de/excel/transformationen/datumstransformation/GK_DHDN_transformiert_nach_UTM_ETRS.xls ...


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Patrick you're on the right track. This is something I've given some thought to so I'll offer some reactions and feedback. Common, Recognized Coordinate Systems First--it's perfectly fine to start the interment dataset in Excel. My guess is you have some "army" of students, genealogy enthusiasts, and possibly some cemetery employees building the point data ...


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I think ArcGIS and ArcGIS online can handle all of that itself, but it's perhaps one of the more pricey software solutions. ArcGIS will let you import any image of the site and georeference it, so you may be able to avoid costly drone procedures. You can draw features very easily on top of images. You can then link tables with some features to add ...


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You should just need to add your Excel worksheet as a table. Then as long as that table has a field that is also present in the feature class use ArcMap (or the Join Field tool) to join them.


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I think you might use Add Join as mentioned above. Yet I belive that Join Field will be of a better use. It simple works as Add join, but adds flexibility to the process, enabling to add only some fields, or all of them. Otherwise, "regular join" will join all fields, which can make quite a mess with big datasets. To elaborate on the "conversion" to ...



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