New answers tagged

1

There's also the MMQGIS plugin which, when downloaded and installed from the toolbar (Plugins > Manage and Install Plugins...), has the tool: Attributes Export to CSV File


2

Export the layer as a shapefile, find the shapefile on your PC. Copy/Rename the filename of the DBF part of the shapefile exportes to be 8 or under characters if it's not. (OLD MS DOS FILENAME ISSUE). Then, drag-drop the DBF right into Excel. Save as XLS. The copy paste method right form QGIS made text/character returns in a blob reset to the next row and ...


1

When automating a process you will need to take it one step at a time. I'll answer your first question: Do you know if there is a way for ModelBuilder to see in an Excel file Yes - as long as you are using an ArcGIS for Desktop version (10.2.1 or later, I think) you will be able to do this using the Excel To Table tool: Converts Microsoft Excel ...


0

You need to first geocode your XLS by converting it to CSV and then (as described in another answer) geocode it using MMQGIS 'geocode CSV with google maps' to create a point shapefile of your addresses. You then need to run a spatial intersect in QGIS using the Vector > Spatial Query tool on your address points and your buildings. You will end up with a ...


2

If you have the data in Excel you'd probably do better doing the calculation in Excel! The Haversine formula (find it here: http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html) will give you the distance between two pairs of latitude and longitude.


2

You basically have an array. I would export this from excel as a space separated ascii file. This will result in what is essentially an ESRI ASCII raster without a header. You can then open this file in a text editor (with word wrap turned off!!!) and add the header as the first few lines. The basic, required, header information contains: the number of rows ...


0

I think you need to arrange your Excel file differently - create 3 columns, for X coordinates, Y coordinates, and the final column for the historical solar radiation. You can then load this into QGIS/ArcGIS, and it will then get mapped properly. GIS software can read coordinates, but doesn't interpret a shape you create in Excel.


2

I had the same problem and simply convert .xlsx to .csv only helped to display the x coordinate. I used the table to table file to create a new table from the .csv file and define the field type to be numeric. After that it worked. To me it seems to be more of an excel problem rather than an ArcGIS 10.3 problem...


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Well, as far as we got now, I would say that it is a bug. I am still confused a bit as it works in the python window with *.xls files and *.xlsx files, but not using a stand alone script. I solved the problem now, as I import the data from the *.xls file to python using xlrd and export it to a *.xlsx file using xlsxwriter. Maybe not the smartest work around, ...


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I don't know how much or what type of information you have in your .CSV, but I looked at files of mine which for instance hold over 500,000 streets (polylines) where the .DAT file is 90MB and another file with 2,500 cities (polygons) where the .DAT file is only 400KB. If you'd like to send me the .CSV I can covert it to .TAB for you through MI and see if I ...


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I couldn't get either to work fully. In the first example, in a directory with both geodatabases and shapefiles, I only got a listing of the feature classes in the geodatabase, but when I commented out the geodatabases portion of the script, I got a list of shapefiles. In the second example, the geodatabases portion didn't work at all, so I copied in the ...


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If your layer is a shapefile, you can also open the *.dbf file with Excel and save it as *.xls format.


1

You can use Save As from the layer popup menu to save attribute table to a CSV file which can be opened by Excel.


2

Use Raster Layer Statistics. It gives you. Statistics [html] Analysis results in HTML format. Minimum value [number] Minimum cell value. Maximum value [number] Maximum cell value. Sum [number] Sum of all cells values. Mean value [number] Mean cell value. Valid cells count [number] Number of cell with data. No-data ...


1

Assuming your coordinates are in decimal degrees (see the answer of HeyOverThere), you just have to export your Excel file as a CSV and import the CSV following this tutorial. You may need to reproject your layer depending on its original datum.


0

If the coordinates are in degrees, minutes, and seconds you'll need to convert those values to decimal. Here's a quick guide on how to do that: http://mathforum.org/sarah/hamilton/ham.degrees.html


3

Form (whole circle) bearing, zenith angle and horizontal distance to X, Y, Z X = X0 + h_distance * sin(deg / 360 * pi()) Y = Y0 + h_distance * cos(deg / 360 * pi()) Z = Z0 + h_distance / tan(zenith / 360 * pi()) X0, Y0, Z0 are the coordinates of the station deg / 360 * pi() changes angle from deg to radians Horizontal distance from slope distance and ...



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