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Try.. ## This script will look for all the layers that have feature selected in them in the TOC and export them in seperated shapefile. ##output layer name will be the original name+ _selected e.g. luzon_loss_selected import arcpy arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") df = ...


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I tested this on 10.3 and got the same result you did. The lines show up in layout view, but not once you export to pdf. It's possible that one of the settings in the export pdf options (and the slightly different arcpy.mapping options) causes this to happen, particularly something to do with compression. I didn't feel like testing them all because I use a ...


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I had an issue similar to the above, and also similar to this: http://osgeo-org.1560.x6.nabble.com/Print-Composer-Rotation-of-Shapefiles-with-transparency-td5100394.html I finally fixed it in the style box of the Layer Properties - I set the transparency in the top Layer Rendering box to 0, and instead changed the layer transparency in the symbol colour ...


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The work should be based on a good data model. You should make sure your objects adhere to national standards - if any. In Norway a lot of work has gone into standardizing graveyards. A PDF document is available describing this standard. It is unfortunately only available in Nrwegian, but Google translate should be able to help you out. From the foreword: ...


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"Used digitally" is pretty broad, and depending on how they will be used or distributed might make a significant difference. As would the data type (vector or raster) shown in the map. For this answer, since your question title explicitly says PowerPoint and your body mentions that, that's what I'll address. The first thing to determine is whether what ...


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I like to use the .emf format--it is a vector format, so you can resize without any issues with pixelation as you sometimes get with raster formats like png and jpg.


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Personally, I use pdf for all maps that will be used digitally. They have the ability to be zoomed in and navigated without losing resolution. There is also a geographic element in Adobe Reader that allows you to display the different layers and information about those layers in a sidebar if needed. I don't know of any general rules, however.


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write is just a wrapper for cat (package base). See ?write: Write Data to a File Description The data (usually a matrix) x are written to file file. If x is a two-dimensional matrix you need to transpose it to get the columns in file the same as those in the internal representation. To write a GeoJSON file, you can use writeOGR() instead ...


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Are you sure that the original "initialDEM.adf" is indeed in the EPSG:31370 coordinate system? Instead of importing with the "-o" flag, try to first create a new region that matches the import DEM by running: r.in.gdal -c input="initialDEM.adf" location="belgium_lambert" Then rerun r.in.gdal without the "-o" flag. BTW, what are you trying to do in the ...


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Work around to this is to use the Conversion Tools>Excell>Table To Excel. This parses properly. Could be that there is a bug in ArcMap 10.2.1 Dor Desktop, for Attribute table export to csv with long value content such as commonly seen in UTM coordinates, 6 and 7 significant digits. These may get parsed with double quotes and internal thousands seperators ...


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It turns out the Centroid(X) and Centroid(Y) in MapInfo are not the line centre point coordinates in BNG. (However to get around the rounding problem I exported the table as a DBF). Instead, I generated these in ArcGIS instead and got perfect results. I achieved my desired result by calculating differences in X and Y values between subsections and taking the ...


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If you want to export shape to CAD, before you export you must to select the entity and then use the export tool.


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You have to remeber that the arcpy module is really just a wrapper around a huge COM library. Most of the time it usually works but every once in a while you run into something like this. My guess is that the problem is in the underlying COM library, in which case this could be difficult to deal with. One thing you can try, although this is a long shot, ...


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i don't trust the gc module as much as I do spawning a separate process. The separate process will do the work and will then be killed after the join(). Try adding: from multiprocessing import process to the top of your script then replace: exportAISMap(mxd_path, pdf_path) with p = Process(target = exportAISMap, args = (mxd_path, pdf_path)) ...


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After exploring some options, since your data has a date/time field and you are already using a time slider, it seems the best way to go is using tools specifically aimed at exporting temporal series maps, rather than DDP or definition queries. The help files on the subject mention that you can use arcpy.mapping python scripts to produce time series output, ...


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Quantum GIS now supports this feature, the resolution can be set and can include an optional world file containing georeferencing information.


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Considering the fact that you are exporting some raster data as well; the best technique, IMHO, is to NOT use the ArcGIS PDF exporter at all but rather export to a high resolution TIFF instead and then convert the tiff using Adobe Acrobat Pro renderer to PDF. (Important note: this only works well with TIFF) You can tweak the rendering options in Adobe if ...


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I have used this script in the past. It is designed to work in ArcMap where you select records and it will select all related records and export to a new feature class, creating duplicate geometries for each related record. import arcpy, os, sys arcpy.env.ovewriteOutput = True arcpy.env.qualifiedFieldNames = False def SelectRelatedRecords(in_ft, in_field, ...



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