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queryTask.executeForExtent(query, callback?, errback?) This is a method of the QueryTask class that returns the extent of the found features. This only works on ArcGIS Server 10.3.1 and later. Here's ESRI's documentation on QueryTask: https://developers.arcgis.com/javascript/3/jsapi/querytask-amd.html#executeforextent To send the query directly, append &...


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The reason was that the projection of the vector and the projection of the polygons drawn are different. To check for intersection, the projection for the vector and the polygons should be the same.


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I was able to piece together some code that essentially just re-projects the coords via a geometry service. I'm assuming that this is somewhat a 'duh' answer to most, but just throwing it out there. That being said, I can get an extent but it doesn't seem to zoom in to the correct location. I'll create a separate post for this issue if I can't figure it ...


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yes, here is my code I have a list of extents listExtent that stores the extents of polygons drawn and I query the list of layers extent from the database to check intersection between the two : listExtent.forEach(function(item, index, array){ //loo[ to get layers extent below <apex:...


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ol.extent.intersects accepts 2 arguments, both of them should be of type ol.extent api doc here So to make it clear ol.extent.intersects is determining whether the supplied extents (not polygons, not layers) are having any kind of spatial intersection.


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I am no expert in this matter but I researched the topic and it turns out that there are several ways a website or a browser tracks our physical location like IP address, HTTP referrer, cookies etc. See this link: http://www.howtogeek.com/115483/htg-explains-learn-how-websites-are-tracking-you-online/ Google maps estimates your location from your browser's ...


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You could just coerce the extent into a SpatialPolygons object and then use "spTransfrom". library(sp) ( e <- raster::extent(-5559753, -4447753, -4447852, -3335852) ) e <- as(e, "SpatialPolygons") sp::proj4string(e) <- "+proj=sinu +lon_0=0 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +a=6371007.181 +b=6371007.181 +units=m +no_defs" e.geo <- sp::...


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Looks like this can be done using the raster package. There is a projectExtent function that returns a warped raster object. Then just need to extract extent(). extent(projectExtent(raster_object,"+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 +no_defs +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0")) Thanks to mdsumner's comment!


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Using the default extent indicator in ArcMap, I don't think you can set transparency on the outline or the fill. However, if you have ArcMap, you should also have access to ArcGIS Pro. The extent indicator in ArcGIS Pro does allow you to have more options with the styling including setting the transparency of the extent indicator outline and fill.



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