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Well, we won't know for sure until a developer debugs the tool to figure out what's happening. In the earlier dataset, the Malaria Ecology Index, the version that triggered the warning had one extra row and column of cells, so it could be a slightly different rounding algorithm when the projected raster's extent is calculated. Without looking at the new ...


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For the sake of explanation let's call your original geotiff source.tif and the manipulated version target.tif. If you use the tool arcpy.management.ExportRasterWorldFile in conjunction with source.tif it will create a world file called source.tfw that contains the tiff's georeferencing information. Assuming that target.tif has the same pixel size, extent ...


2

Obviously you can do rectangular bounding box selection with default selection tool with mouse/touchpad down + hold and move + up (there is also selection tool by polygon, freehand and elipse) You can also use Select features using expression and make selection by comparing feature Geometry xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax to your extent - minimum, maximum ...


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There is a bug in the Project Raster Tool. The output raster from the Project Raster tool is a little too big on the eastern edge, and on the southern edge (bottom of the easternmost gore/lobe). So the data extent doesn't quite match what the extent of a Goode's Homolosine projection is, and triggers the "not consistent extent" warning. A workaround is to ...


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Alrighty, I finally found out how to set the parameters. The problems were due to the resolution and the extent arrays. I) The resolution array needed a "z+1" instead of "z": for (var z = 0; z <= 16; z++) { resolutions[z] = maxResolution / Math.pow(2, z+1); } (btw: the number of z in the for-loop defines the number of available zoom levels) II) ...


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You can pull this out of the DBs that ship with GeoTools as well. There is a method on CRS for it whose name escapes me but should be obvious.


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You can download the EPSG data from http://www.epsg.org/DownloadDataset after you register. No cost to register, and no delay between registration and download. There are two formats that might be useful - a set of PostgreSQL scripts (also other databases, but PostgreSQL is the one I checked) that insert data, so you can do a query of the epsg_area table. ...


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Download the MS Access database and/or the polygon shapefiles from the EPSG Geodetic Dataset Registry (upper right, "export registry"). You do have to register, but we don't spam or sell the list of registered users. The MS Access database contains the rectangular extent areas of use only. Or you can download the files from the OGP website, same login ...


3

Set the Output Extent environment setting with arcpy.env.extent, then make a copy of the raster import arcpy from arcpy.sa import * arcpy.CheckOutExtension('Spatial') arcpy.env.extent = arcpy.Extent(0,0,10,10) arcpy.env.cellSize = 1 #Dummy raster just for demonstration a = CreateConstantRaster(1) print a.extent.XMin 0.0 #Widen Extent arcpy.env.extent = ...


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What GIS are you using? If it's ArcGIS, try the Minimum Bounding Geometry tool. Can you give us more info? It would help a lot.


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SELECT ST_Extent(ST_Transform(the_geom,4326)) AS extent FROM sometable; ST_Extent is an aggregate function. ST_Transform takes an integer SRID as a second argument, so in this case it returns your geometry as WGS84 coordinates.



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