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Your function is expecting a feature class Shared Sub ShowDistinctFieldAliasNames(ByVal featureClass As IFeatureClass) but you're passing in a document ShowDistinctFieldAliasNames(My.ArcMap.Document) To pass in a feature class, you'll have to find a layer in that document and verify that it's a feature class. Something like this: dim pLayer As ...


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Are you sure that your confidence values are stored as ints and not floats? This line of your code: if int(lstValues[2]) > minThresh: will always return False if the confidence values stored in your text file are stored as numbers between 0.0 and 1.0, which is typically how confidence values are reported. Try replacing that line with this line to ...


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This code is pretty simple, but it should work for what you want to do. Again, in the time it took to write the code, you could rename the featureclasses by yourself, but the logic works if you need to scale it up to a larger number. import arcpy from arcpy import env # Set Output Geodatabase Name outgdb = "C:/workspace/outfc.gdb" #Set Range to cycle ...


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import arcpy from arcpy import * env.workspace = r"C:\IND_Rivers\New\Outputs\A3\a3_03.gdb" fcList = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() #attempts to replace feature classes with "a1" with "a6" for fc in fcList: nn = 'a6' + fc[3:] arcpy.Rename_management(fc, nn)


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the geodatabase is composed of feature classes. your mxd (which is your map) is simply a visual representation of the geodatabase with symbology, extents, labels, etc. if you want to create a copy of your GDB there are several options but the easiest is to just go into arc catalog and create a new gdb, then load your feature classes into it. there are ...


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This is a broad question. Here is my generic answer for ESRI (sounds like you are using ESRI with a FGDB): find an ArcGIS tutorial. Best place for (structured) ArcGIS tutorials You do not have to start with a GDB at all, in-fact if you are using ESRI then a shapefile is easy enough to start with. And yes, one MXD can and usually will have data from ...


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You can not store feature classes outside of a Geodatabase, feature classes/databases can only exist within a geodatabase. You can store layer files independent of a gdb, but a Layer file does not hold any spatial data, it is only a reference to a featureclass/shapefile, usually used to store the symbology that you have assigned to one such feature. If you ...


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The code you require is below: import arcpy # Set workspace arcpy.env.workspace = r"C:\Scratch\fGDB_Scratch.gdb" # This returns a list of FeatureClasses in the top level of the geodatabase fcl = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses("*") # Main loop for fc in fcl: print "Adding fields to " + fc # The "#" inputs mean just use defaults ...


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I believe with the append tool both source and destination table schemas have to be the same (field names/types). Here are some options: Use the Merge tool, select features, and field calculate (not recommended since you have to be careful what you have selected before calculating) Make sure the table schemas are the same between source and destination ...


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The Metadata Toolset will allow you to import metadata from the source feature class into the destination feature class... However, you will only retain metadata from one of the input feature classes, not both: Merging metadata stylesheets does not work with ArcGIS - exporting each input feature class metadata to a template and merging both templates will ...


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A simple Intersect between the two layers will give you the NTA attributes on each of the points. This assumes you have a one polygon for each point relationship. If a point could fall in more than one polygon (unlikely given your data description), you'd need something different. Also, any points that do not fall in a polygon will be dropped. For other ...



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