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4

For a full geodatabase, a quick solution is to create a bounding polygon based on the extents of each feature class. Of course, I assume that all your feature classes are in the same coordinate system. you can loop on the feature classes of the geodatabase, request the extent and store the min, max values in X and Y. something like below (same for Y) minX ...


2

You could loop through all the feature classes in the gdb and use the minimum bounding geometry gp tool to create convex hull polys in memory and then run a final minimum bounding geometry process on all these polys. This is untested, but something like this may work: import os, arcpy def iter_ws(workspace, dataType='Any', ftype='ANY', wildcard='*'): ...


1

Here's the update: I used tkFileDialog.askdirectory() to get the gdb name to set the workspace. Then I used arcpy.da.Walk() from the data access module to load the feature classes into an array. My next step would be, put a ttk combobox on the GUI and load feature classes into the drop-down of the combobox so users get to specify the feature class to do ...


0

You can't use a file dialogue to select a FileGDB feature class as it is not a file, it's part of a database. You need to use Esri arcpy or a library that implements the Esri FileGDB or Open FileGDB APIs such as GDAL.


1

Success! For tables other than the FeatureLayer, you have to do the following: Create a StandaloneTableClass, set the Table property, you may now access and setup any properties you like from the IFieldInfo interface. After that you have to add the StandaloneTable to the map by casting IMap to IStandaloneTableCollection. ITable = ...// Create your ...


2

i've been migrating a bit of data to sqlite recently, and am relatively happy with the result. As you mention, it is a compact file that is easily portable - much like a personal geodatabase, without the limitations of MSAccess. One of the big "gotchas" is the inability to edit data in SQLite from ArcMap (at least as far as I know with 10.2.1). This post ...


0

Give this a read - Editing The ArcGIS Web APIs provide simple feature editing. The features must come from an ArcSDE geodatabase. This geodatabase can be licensed for either workgroup or enterprise use and does not have to be versioned.


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The description of IFieldInfo3.Readonly Property says, Setting the value to true will make the field read only in clients such as the ArcMap editor attribute window. This property only applies to clients that choose to implement it. So I think you can only restrict the user only after the feature class is added to map as a layer.


1

Try copy and paste. It should work better than the simple data loader. The simple data loader is only for "simple" data. Feature classes and tables. Geometric networks are considered complex and most likely won't load with the simple data loader. That error is expected. This article is from 9.3.1 but explains the problem. Use the object loader not the ...


2

Right clic the Feature class in ArcCatalog and go to the Properties. In the Feature Extent tab, clic on Recalculate. And voilĂ ! I'm using ArcGIS 10.2.1


1

Try using the ArcGIS ModelBuilder. You can drag & drop the tools you're using right out of ArcToolbox to create your process into model builder, and then save it as one geoprocessing tool. Run that, and everything should rebuild the same way every time.


1

For the script shown here as-is, I think the first error is located in the way we've passed our input dataset parameter to the arcpy.Append_management() tool. It appears that we are attempting to append a feature class called "shp_file" rather than passing the string variable called shp_file, which you have created a few lines above. For this issue, maybe ...



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