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45

To store the data, the first two alternatives to mention are PostGIS and SpatiaLite. SpatiaLite is a SQLite database with spatial capabilities which means it is file based, compact, and fast. PostGIS is spatial capabilities on a PostgreSQL database. That means it is very powerful with capacity to handle large data sets, complex queries in a efficient way. ...


37

Quantum GIS uDig OpenJump gvSIG TerraView Kosmos WhiteBox


24

I would look at OSGeo.org for this. They maintain a collection of Open Source GIS packages and utilities. This includes: GRASS OSSIM Quantum GIS gvSIG In addition, there are many useful tools and libraries, such as GDAL, OGR, OpenLayers, etc.


18

I use Ubuntu 10.04 for several reasons: Open source tools command-line tools (e.g. ogr2ogr or pgsql2shp) are much more pleasant to run from almost any linux than from Windows. Not only is something like gnome-terminal a lot more usable than cmd.exe, but I find that being able to trivially run a few bash commands gives a nice productivity boost for one off ...


16

For a basic viewer, I've been playing with WxGIS Catalog, which does the basics nicely but could use some fleshing out for more complex use cases. There's also RasterCatalog for QGIS, but as the name states, its only for rasters. On OS X, try GISlook, but none of these look to handle the spatial database engines directly.


15

Nicklas has already pointed out the most popular open source packages. If you are interested in a closer coupling of desktop and server GIS, you might want to have a closer look at QGIS. Similar to the setup you described for ArcGIS, there is such a setup for QGIS: PostGIS for data storage QGIS Desktop to edit the data and create the map document QGIS ...


15

I disagree that there are only two options in the GIS industry on a number of levels. The first is that there are many other well established commercial GIS offerings other than ESRI SmallWorld, Bentley, AutoDesk, ERDAS, MapInfo, Integraph and Idrisi spring to mind without thinking too hard. You say they have a market share "well below" ESRI. ESRI ...


11

I am afraid I disagree with you. I think the ArcGIS help/forums/blogs/vids/etc give a great perspective on what you can achieve with the ArcGIS range of products. Your not limited to Python to manipulate your spatial data. You can still use VBA at 931 and 10 to access the ArcObjects library, or you could take it a step further and use .NET to do all sorts ...


10

ESRI's been around for a long time, and essentially helped invent the term "GIS". There are other big players, but they often come from a different angle (i.e. AutoCAD Map 3D, or Intergraph/Microstation). Increasingly all these different dominant players in the maps/drafting/design world are starting to overlap and come together, but they still hold their ...


9

Most of the major open-source GIS software is compatible in any of the big three (Windows, OS X, Linux). I'd start with trying some of the software out in whatever operating system you're already familiar with, GIS will provide enough challenges without you being flummoxed when navigating your filesystem. Compiling GIS software from source is a challenge on ...


7

It is a very broad question. Cost Implementation Support Speed Limitations The bottom line is you get what you pay for. Oracle Spatial which can only be used with Oracle Enterprise Edition. One can use Oracle Locator, but has less of the native tools for GIS. Spatial also has GeoRaster which is an image format stored inside the database. The next ...


7

If you are just looking to get started with open source GIS then you probably don't need to worry about operating system. I can't think of any major programs that won't run on all the major operating systems. Once you get into advanced work then you might benefit from using a Linux distro but not while starting. So I'd recommend sticking with what you know ...


7

To answer the question: Why no industry standard product from any established software giants? The problem is you appear to be begging the question. There is an industry standard product from an established software giant. They're called ESRI and being founded in 1969 they easily predate Microsoft (1975), Google (1998), Oracle(1977), and Apple(1976). The ...


6

If you're interested in learning more about this area, the problem is named cartographic displacement, and its one aspect of cartographic generalization. A couple of articles discussing displacement and approaches for handling the problem: Bader, Matthias. 2001. Energy Minimization Methods for Feature Displacement in Map Generalization. Steiniger, S Tefan ...


6

GeoApt Data Browser looks quite promising, but I haven't yet managed to make it run on Windows. The big advantage over wxGIS Catalog for me would be that you can access the dataset's metadata. Update: As @dassouki mentioned above, there is also a new QGIS Browser which supports raster, vector and WMSS data. You can drag and drop layers to QGIS from there. ...


6

ogr2ogr has a "segmentize" option that appears to do what you need: GDAL ogr2ogr documentation From that page: -segmentize max_dist: (starting with GDAL 1.6.0) maximum distance between 2 nodes. Used to create intermediate pointsspatial query extents


6

Version 9.0 of GDAL/OGR added the -simplify option to the ogr2ogr command. The documentation indicates that it preserves topology. -simplify tolerance: (starting with GDAL 1.9.0) distance tolerance for simplification. This method will preserve topology, in particular for polygon geometries. Example usage: ogr2ogr outfile.shp infile.shp -simplify ...


5

Speaking from the perspective of what I use day-to-day (though this is colored by my involvement in most of the projects): file geodatabase or ArcSDE geodatabase for data storage PostGIS, SQLite, and Shapefiles, in order from best database to most portable format. ArcMap desktop to edit the data and compile the map document QGIS for spatial ...


4

While Ubuntu is good for desktop use you will find that there is better support for CentOS(/RHEL) as a server. From a GIS point of view there is not much difference. RHEL has better manufacturer support so programs for management, backup, drivers (, integration with windows networks) are generally easier to install Eg. If you buy a Dell or HP server all ...


4

One thing about PostGIS is that it is the most likely candidate for having a native interface present in other open source projects. For example, in QGIS 1.4.0, there is a button sitting right in the menu bar that says "Add PostGIS Layer". SpatiaLight also has a toolbar entry but there is no similar support for other databases like MySQL.


4

SAGA GIS, System for Automated Geoscientic Analysis, is often under represented in floss GIS lists. SAGA developed from raster processing roots, and is thus very strong there, and grew into vector handling and analysis later. It is a mature tool.


4

I think this is a very interesting question. The only problem with it I think is the tags. Most people loving the alternatives will miss this one since it is not tagged "open-source" or anything else that broaden the audience. I am not experienced enough to give a give an answer from very many aspects, but... I did my first things in gis in Arcview 3.x ...


4

You could try Shapely - a Python API built on top of GEOS. As both Shapely and GDAL have Python libraries you can easily combine them to data from many different sources (including shapefiles) and then simplifying and exporting as desired. The only downside may be speed if you are doing millions of features - it could be faster to use GEOS or JTS directly. ...


4

check out this video Vector topology cleaning with QGIS and GRASS.it uses GRASS Toolbox v.clean which @artwork21 has mentioned. This video shows how to resolve a few common vector topology problems using GRASS tools of the category "v.clean" through the Quantum GIS interface. i hope it helps you...


3

If you want to consider other applications outside of Spatial Analyst, you might consider looking into the the SEXTANTE library. While I have not personally used it, if you watch this video clip, you can see that they demonstrate ways to work with rasters. Why might you consider this toolset? They already have built the "SEXTANTE for ArcGIS extension" ...


3

"...Fill Color window to adjust the colors I need It opens in CMYK and I need to Change it to RGB" Funny, I learnt how to do this last week. open ArcMap --> add a layer --> go to colour pallete Change the CYMK to RGB Save the document to Normal.mxt under your doc & settings (under the ESRI folder) Close and re-open ArcMap --> Will always be ...


3

However this not the case in other streams of information technology, databases and programming languages in broad sense. Having one dominant market player is not rare for professional programs on a PC: Autodesk for CAD, Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop/Indesign,...


3

You could look at any open source software that handles the KML operations you need, and just adapt the software to suit your needs. However since you asked for something to "help", I guess you're looking for something a bit more "library" like - an adapter that works over the top of libkml that does some of the work for you. If so, you might like to check ...


2

This problem is a very typical one in cartographic generalisation. Automated methods exist for that, but no implementations are available yet. Methods based on "Beams" and "Snakes" give efficient results to solve these cartographic conflicts of network data (see also the references given by scw). Here are some results of the beams algorithms on road data: ...


2

On the ArcGIS platform, if you are not doomed to manual work, then you are doomed to do some programming work (not bad for me since I enjoy that sort of thing)! I don't know of a way in 9.3.x to override default values in the geodatabase without resorting to custom tools. This is what I do, especially if it's a set of repetitive edit operations. In ...



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