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9

Use QGIS - http://www.qgis.org/ First import the GPX file, then from print composer export SVG.


6

No, the GPX driver of GDAL which is used by Qgis for Save As does not know how to handle polygon geometries, and throws an error. But you can convert the polygon into a line geometry using Vector->Geometry-Tools->Polygon to line, and export the resulting new shapefile to GPX. Most probably you want to add FORCE_GPX_TRACK=YES in the layer creation ...


6

GPS Babel is the tool you want. It can convert between a huge number of formats!


5

You may use GPSBabel. garmin GDB format is supported (see this page). Something like that should work: gpsbabel -i gdb -f file.gdb -o gpx A short batch file to loop through and convert all files in a directory: for %%f in (x:\garmin_data\*.gdb) do ( gpsbabel -i gdb -f "%%f" -o gpx -F "x:\gpx_data\%%~nf.gpx" ) The first -f is the input file and ...


5

GPS Babel is your friend for all 'consumer grade' GPS units. Download, convert, transfer etc. all from one program! You can also use it from within QGIS as a plugin as well.


4

To elaborate on HasT's answer, use GPSBabel to translate the GPX file to another format; I prefer to use CSV which appears as "Universal csv with field structure in first line" in GPSBabel's format dropdown. Then in QGIS make sure you have the Add Delimited Text Layer plugin enabled and use it to add your new csv file to your map.


4

The Garmin World base map is very abstracted, so I would not give much on accuracy of that map. You can try a free Openstreetmap built map for Garmin units of your region, and see if the offset remains. You don't have to put it on the unit itself, they work with Basecamp as well.


4

There really isn't a simple answer to this. Primarily because you cannot simply convert a distance in feet to 'degrees' like you could feet to meters. The distance between degrees of latitude are generally constant across the globe but the distance between degrees of longitude varies according to latitude since they converge at the poles. If you want to ...


4

As you said, differential correction is based on the correction of the position of EACH satellite viewed in order to compute a new position. So I confirm that it is NOT possible to do differential correction if you only have the coordinates, even if you had the exact time. If you want to improve the precision of your measurements with a unit that does not ...


4

RTK is for real-time centimetre-level accuracy. I don't think that you need such a bazooka to locate trees in a farm (I assume that those trees are isolated if you talk about a farm and not a forest). Furthermore, RTK relies on signal emitted from a ground based station which might not be available in your area (especially if it is mountainous). On the ...


3

One option is to use QlandKarte GT. This is free/open-source software, available for Windows, OS X, or Linux. To reference the map, you can go to map menu -> Edit/create map. Then follow the steps convert the map into a GeoTIFF. Then create a map collection from that. Go to map menu -> Select sub map, and select the tiles in your map. Choose the selected ...


3

Quantum GIS has a plugin "Garmin Custom Map" for the purpose you want: http://hub.qgis.org/projects/garmincustommap You can get it via the standard python plugin repository. I have not tried it myself, because my own (old) Etrex can not read custom maps. Georeferencing is installed by default with Quantum GIS, and you can add selfmade vector overlays or GPX ...


3

This website is meant to be able to generate svg from a .gpx file. http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/ I have never used it though.


3

Load your GPS points into Adobe Illustrator http://www.avenza.com/mapublisher/features [MAP GPS] (at cost of purchase)


3

There are a few speeds that can be immediately tossed out: 30 ft/s = 20 mph < 30 mph 30 km/h = 19 mph < 30 mph 30 yd/s = 61 mph > 30 mph (not exactly a standard measurement) The only other "common" speed I'd say is m/s, which works well: 30 m/s = 67 mph > 30 mph If you can confirm that elevation is given in meters (it looks like it is for ...


2

@Gray, first, upgrade to QGIS 1.7.4-4, if you can. Transferring data, via the GPS Tools, leverages the GPSBabel tool. When debugging a GPS (that appears to not be working with QGIS) it is best to start with GPSBabel and see if it connects and downloads data in .gpx format, which can be added to QGIS via the GPS Tools directly. You're in luck, many users of ...


2

Enable on-the-fly reprojection in project settings. Make sure the Garmin waypoint layer is set to WGS84 in layer properties and the topocard layer is set to Web Mercator ("Google Mercator"). If you still have the OpenLayers layer loaded, you might experience problems if you try to set the project CRS to anything else but Web Mercator.


2

I guess it depends where you are located, as the precision of the etrex 30 will depend on how many satellites (GPS and Glonass) you can see. As far as I know (but I might be wrong), the Glonass constellation is not so dense over northern America, but better in Asia and Europe. From my experience the sensitivity of the etrex30 is much much better than the ...


2

You can see a comparison table between the two on the Garmin website. The eTrex 30 supports GLONASS in addition to GPS, which (at least in theory) means more satellites and more accuracy.


2

The OpenStreetMap wiki lists several tools that can convert from OSM to Garmin IMG and general conversion and installation instructions.


2

When I worked for Navigon the way we accessed the filesystem on the devices which were running Windows Mobile 5 was to put a text file with a particular name on the root of the SD card / USB, and it had a weird name like win.reg or something like that, and plugging it in would give you a windows file explorer instead of the standard device boot sequence / ...


2

etrex 20 & 30 have microSD™ cards - you can read directly from the card from QGIS. Note: Garmin Connect™ compatible (online community where you analyze, categorize and share data) so you can upload it then download the data to to view in QGIS.


2

Since your track is NOT a polygon, but rather a line, I think there's no way around manually editing the line to snap the endpoints to the exact same location. So: Once you're downloaded the gpx file from the GPS, do "Save As..." to save it as a shapefile. Now load that shapefile, and start editing. Be sure snapping is setup correctly (Settings-> Snapping ...


2

For etrex 20 & 30 (but not the 10) see the compare guide: https://buy.garmin.com/shop/compare.do?cID=145&compareProduct=87774&compareProduct=87771&compareProduct=87768 (see custom maps compatible) Garmin have free instructions on how to use Google Earth and your custom images (scanned topographic route maps) in this case and loading it to ...


2

Choose "Save as" -> "GPS eXchange Format (GPX)":


1

One option is to create a KML overlay. I can't specifically remember how to do it manually. Basically, it's a zip file with an internal folder structure to house images. There's also an XML file involved which maps the images to the project space. I collaborated on an ArcExplorer plugin to do the heavy for this. I realize you're on a Mac and this isn't ...


1

you shouldn't expect high accuracy from a handheld GPS. It has 3 meters error approximately. It can be linked to arcpad. Accuracy definition depends upon your application.


1

Garmin Products require JPEG format You Can use Google Earth to Create Custom Maps for Garmin "Garmin Custom Maps require your map be saved in JPEG format. If your map is printed, scan the map at an appropriate resolution¹, and save the image as a JPEG. If your map is electronic, such as a PDF, it may require conversion using GIMP or another ...


1

Try the programm GPSBabel (http://www.gpsbabel.org/).



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