Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

In Addtion to saving defined layer styles within project files on the network, you can create a single Spatialite enabled database.sqlite, if your workflow isn't too busy. For myself, I've replicated a fgdb by importing a hundred shapefiles and a couple hundred datatables, with great performance. Spatialite won't allow for PostGIS or FileGDB style ...


8

You can achieve this by preparing all those layers in one (or more) project files. Share these projects on the network and you can load them using Layer - Embed Layers and Groups. If you want to change anything in these layers, open the original project file and changes will appear in all projects that contain embedded layers.


7

Code If the layer is a shapefile, Layer.datasetName will return the file name. Please read the documentation in the following link to help you understand more about the datasetName parameter of the Layer object: dataSource (Read Only) : Returns the complete path for the layer's data source. It includes the workspacePath and the datasetName properties ...


7

If the FileGDB driver for GDAL/OGR didn't work (and that's what I suspect from your question), then unfortunately I suspect that the GDB format is <10.0 and locked from the open source world. Esri software is required to open old GDB files. Even Safe's FME requires ArcObjects. If you can, ask the data provider to provide an unrestricted file format, ...


6

Anecdotally: A general rule of thumb that I have experienced in my ventures is if the GDB is serving as the back-end for a web application, many more times than not (~85%) it is stored in a RDBMS. The advantages of doing so far outweigh the disadvantages in most cases: Advantages: 1: Easy backups and logging of activity 2: More control over user ...


6

This may help to find the created date: How to get file creation & modification date/times in Python? You'll probably want to read up on the os.path and datetime modules and string formatting in Python (new or old styles). Here is a small example to hopefully get you going: import os, datetime fc = r"C:\GISData\atlantic_hurricanes_2000.shp" ctime = ...


6

The following code is used to List Workspaces, in this case, File Geodatabases. It does not check for the file extension .gdb, but is looking for its internal type. This should leave out directories with a .gdb extension, but which are not actually File GDB's. import arcpy arcpy.env.workspace = "C:/Data" # List all file geodatabases in the current ...


5

If you are using FME to do the data load, I think you may as well use it to read the original table and do the transformation stage. Then it's all in one process. If you do the work in Workbench then there are transformers for parsing, trimming, and concatenating. I won't say this is the best way, or compare it to any others, because I currently work for ...


5

This message: During translation, some features were read that did not match a reader feature type in the workspace. This can happen if the reader dataset is changed, or a reader feature type removed or renamed. ...should have nothing to do with how the data is written, just what is read. This FME Evangelist post should explain that part of the ...


5

Please have a look at the Copy Rows geoprocessing tool. The code can be as simple as the following: import arcpy arcpy.CopyRows_management("C:/data/vegtable.csv", "C:/output/output.gdb/vegtable")


3

Yes! Open your OSGeo4W downloader, select advance setup, and then select gdal-filegdb under the libs tree. There's a step-by-step tutorial here: How to get ".GDB" (Esri File Geodatabase) support in Quantum GIS (osgeo4w - qgis) Please note that the FileGDB API Does not support Raster Images.


3

Where @Get Spatial's answer is partially correct, but it doesn't solve the problem directly. So answering my own question: desc = arcpy.Describe(filePath) print desc.dataType It prints the type of the object given path is directing. For folders, it prints Folder and for geodatabases it prints Workspace


3

You need to understand the CAD file format (DWG have many variants) and going to a folder based format (File Geodatabase). Note: ArcGIS does need to be installed for conversion to ESRI Geodatabase formats. [But not shapefiles] Here is a video from Safe Software last week [22nd November 2011] CAD to GIS formats ...


2

Since all your tasks are geoprocessing tasks you could just create a model and export out the model to either a vb, python, or jscript. Below is an example of a vbs script. You can then call the script with a macro or UI Control. Dim gp As object ' Create the Geoprocessor object set gp = CreateObject("esriGeoprocessing.GPDispatch.1") ' Check out any ...


2

This ArcGIS help for Setting the Default Geodatabase might be what you are looking for. I believe the "Default" is something that has to be set upon each map document's creation. After that, it should be accessible through the settings in the MXD. I'm away from my station so I can't confirm the exact toolbar rigamarole. However it should be noted that ...


2

A couple things need to happen here: GDAL has to of been compiled with ESRI FileGDB support (ie, --with-fgdb=/usr/lib/filegdb-api) The FileGDB you have has to be >= v10 FileGDB Open the FileGDB using QGIS: Layer > Add Vector Layer > Directory > Type: ESRI FileGDB > Navigate to gdb folder, highlight and press OK till you are back at map There are some ...


2

Absolutely! Registering a table with ArcSDE creates metadata in the SDE user SDE_* tables. Registering a table with the geodatabase does an ArcSDE registration and populates XML metadata in the SDE.GDB_* tables. Registering as versioned registers with the geodatabase and enables the ArcSDE versioning capability on the table. As such, I wouldn't describe ...


1

Try changing this line: intable = arcpy.GetParameter(0) to intable = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) Also I think you meant this line: old_field = field_name + "OLD_" to actually be old_field = "OLD_" + field_name Finally your calculate line should be: arcpy.CalculateField_management(intable, old_field, '"' + "!" + field.name + "!" + '"')


1

In the Add vector layer dialog select Directory radio button and you should see FGD as an option, see caption below: Then just browse and select the .gdb directory through the browse window. You will then see a list of the feature classes within which you can select to add to your project.


1

f variable only contains the name of the featureclass. You could set the environment workspace variable arcpy.env.workspace = out_loc # "C:/data/base.gdb" Or you could join the path as the ESRI help suggest: Names in the lists include only the base name; no path components are included. To get a full path (which begins with top) to a file or ...


1

you can use Global IDs to create and save IDs . If you want to save th IDs in all of locations and without any conflicts and changes, the Global ID is the best for you .


1

As Get Spatial suggested, it was indeed a problem with the created features being added to the Table of Contents, for I had checked the "add to display" option in one of the tools that I made to create the files. Once I unchecked that option, the files were created in their respective file GDB without being added to the ToC, making the deletion of said GDBs ...


1

Take a look at using the in_memory workspace in Modelbuilder rather than creating temporary GDBs. From: http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Using_in_memory_workspace/002w0000005s000000/ "Data written to the in-memory workspace is temporary and will be deleted when the application is closed." However, depending on the size/intensity ...


1

I think what you need to do is create the attribute fields (as User Attributes) in your target and then, if the target/source attributes are not named identically, you may have to explicitly map the source attributes to those new target User Attributes. If you have a lot of attributes, you can also import attribute fields from the Writers menu:


1

I'm by no means an expert at this kind of thing and I'm not at all familiar with FME Desktop, but if I were in your shoes, I'd bridge the two databases with a script that pulls the data over ODBC, completes all the modifications in-script, and then pushes the results to your SQL Server DB (again over ODBC). I'd write that script in R, because it's what I ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible