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It is about transferring points coordinates to table. You might use this process: Add X and Y fields to points' table Join above to TABLE using common field. Calculate similar field e.g. [XN]=Points!X Export joined table to new one. Create XY event table from output at step 4. Based on your Q you'll end up with duplicate points in some cases.


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The difference is because the Census locator is based on TIGER street files, which is not as a complete a dataset as Google Streets has. So for any given road, the TIGER streets may have an address range of 1-1000 whereas in reality the range is updated with more houses, etc. Some roads may not even exist within the TIGER files. The street segments in TIGER ...


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I looked up a little more after posting my comment. The Census is a range based geocoding service. They state... The current Geocoding Services engine requires a structure address be provided. The resulting lat/long is calculated along an address range. Google on the other hand, looks to have a variety of options in their geocoding service. I ...


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There's a great dataset over at Open Knowledge Foundation too which includes ISO 3166 alpha3, alpha2, numeric as well as many others. http://data.okfn.org/data/core/country-codes#data https://github.com/datasets/country-codes


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One possibility would be to use a turns feature class or table to model an increased time impedance for all turns. The idea would be to use a high value for turns (such as 15-20) seconds, and a low impedance for straights (0-5). Then, as routes are created, every time a turn is the "fastest route", the additional impedance time will likely influence the ...


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I'm not based in the USA, but I've only heard good things about the TIGER geocoder, and it seems to be the best complement with PostGIS. To quote that link: The goal of this project is to build a fully functional geocoder that can process an arbitrary United States address string and using normalized TIGER census data, produce a point geometry and rating ...


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For geocoding (converting an address to a lonlat), you might consider Nominatim, which uses OpenStreetMap data and runs on PostGIS. I've gotten pretty good accuracy out of it, but it varies depending on region. It can also do reverse geocoding (lonlat -> address).


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What you do is edit the generated script down to the county you want. Take a look at our presentation where we describe the process: http://www.postgis.us/Presentations/PGOpen2014_Session1.html#/5/5


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You could geocode the adresses: For example with http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/geocoder/ or the MMQGIS-Plugin: Then do a spatial join: And there you have the assigned Municipalities: For measuring the point density you could count the points per polygon: Or use the Heatmap-Tool (Raster --> Heatmap)



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