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When you do a geocode using the TIGER Geocoder on that address, the TIGER data for Georgia has "Sandy Springs" (place) attached to the road (edges). The code is pretty complex but you can debug it in pgAdmin. Simplifying the geocoder code helps identify how the geocoder is retrieving "Sandy Springs": SELECT b.fullname,f.placefp,p.name FROM edges as b ...


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In case any R users stumble upon this thread, here's the R solution: The countrycode package contains a full list of country codes in many different formats. From the package documentation: Supports the following coding schemes: Correlates of War character, CoW-numeric, ISO3-character, ISO3-numeric, ISO2-character, IMF numeric, International Olympic ...


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On many Linux distributions, a list of iso country codes is installed by default under: /usr/share/xml/iso-codes/iso_3166.xml Under Fedora/CentOS/RHEL/Debian, the package that contains this file is called iso-codes (project homepage). The XML file contains the mapping in a hierarchical structure: <iso_3166_entries> <iso_3166_entry ...


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If you are working with US data then the Tiger Geocoder runs on Linux... see this link


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This answer is to fulfill your request for "Other methods"... I used this post to help me set up and install my own windows server to geocode US addresses. Basic instructions are to: Install PostgreSQL (open source database) Install PostGIS and TIGER extensions Use TIGER functions to download/install US TIGER data by state


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I followed this guide to ensure that my osm2po data was properly/fully indexed. There were no indexes on the Geometry columns after a fresh load of data. Most of my undesired performance issues were related to the Tiger Geocoder taking ~13 secs to provide a result after a fresh load of tiger data with 8 states. I followed this guide for missing indexes ...


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Given your 0% match combined with your mention of digitized historic maps (big props to you for putting in the work required to represent change over time!!) it's likely that you need to link some additional attribute data to your roads before any sort of geocoding will work. every road segment, for example, in the u.s. census bureau's road network is ...


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You can use the geotext python library for the same. pip install geotext all it takes is to install this library. The usage is as simple as: from geotext import GeoText places = GeoText("London is a great city") places.cities gives the result 'London' The list of cities covered in this library is not extensive but it has a good list.


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For a naive approach you can use this SQL select: SELECT v.nev, f.nev, ST_Distance(v.geom, f.geom) FROM varos AS v CROSS JOIN folyo AS f WHERE (v.nev, ST_Distance(v.geom, f.geom)) in ( SELECT varos.nev, min(ST_Distance(varos.geom, folyo.geom)) FROM varos CROSS JOIN folyo WHERE varos.nev = v.nev GROUP BY varos.nev); This Query selects the nearest city ...


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Mapzen has a really cool geocoding service that allows you to query the name of the place to get an XY coordinate. (https://mapzen.com/documentation/search/search/). You can get a free API key from their developers page which will allow you to make 30,000 queries per day at 6 per second. (https://mapzen.com/) Here's a function that will return the XY ...


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I think there's a couple of things going on here. Firstly you need to have a valid what3words API key and either define this as an environment variable called W3W_API_KEY or pass it as the "key" parameter. Secondly, what3words isn't defined as a module by the geocoder, it's the w3w method on the geocoder module that you'll need to invoke. Finally, ...


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The basic idea of geocoding is taking a human understandable representation of location (ex: 123 W Main St) and using a geocoding tool or service to transform that into a digitally understandable representation of location (ex: Latitude/Longitude coordinates). And with that basis, it can be seen that while an address is typically what geocoding is used for, ...


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If you have a table with lat & long for a set of locations and you use that to create a point layer, then that technically is geocoding. In practice, the tool that does this task is not referred to as a "geocoding" tool. Most "geocoding" tools work primarily with address data. Some also use census or survey data.


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Try unmatching the address first, it could already be matched. I've attached two screen grabs to show what I mean.



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