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4

ThePlacename.com has an api that returns place borders in GeoJSON format: http://theplacename.com/restapi


4

If you do not find any it is not difficult to set up your own. Install Geoserver and you can get geojson out from WFS with requests like ...


3

I am not sure which GDAL version ogr2gui is using but with a current ogr2ogr it is for sure possible. Read first the driver manual page http://www.gdal.org/drv_csv.html Layer creation options: GEOMETRY (Starting with GDAL 1.6.0): By default, the geometry of a feature written to a .csv file is discarded. It is possible to export the geometry in its ...


3

There is a plugin for that: Leaflet.Terminator.


3

The quickest way to do this is https://mangomap.com, you should be able to get the whole thing set up in about 10 minutes without writing a single line of code. I'm the CEO, just give me a ping on chris@mangomap.com if you have any questions.


2

I'm not sure who you consulted, but this doesn't seem like great advice. The problem seems to be not one of negative values but more the order of x and y co-ordinates. A latitude (y) can only be in the range of -90 to +90. Longitude (x) can be -180 to +180, broadly speaking. These co-ordinates are from the equator and the Greenwich meridian, respectively. ...


2

Two options: You could try using this python script, to merge. Add the geojson into QGIS, convert to shapefile, edit/merge features, and finally export back out to geojson.


2

The controls on the map appear to be OpenLayers. Here's how you can find out yourself what kind of data it's using in the client in Chrome or Firefox: In Chrome, go to Menu > Tools > Developer Tools and switch to the Network tab. In Firefox, go to Menu > Developer > Network Refresh the page, pan around the map a few times, see what resources load.


1

You can write a script that reads the JSON file, appends the new features and write it back. That way when the map is loaded, it reads the new GeoJSON file. import json # Load existing data with open('test.json') as f: data = json.load(f) # Add data feature = {} feature['type'] = 'Feature' feature['geometry'] = {'type': 'Point', ...


1

I checked your code and it appears all you did in your ajax success callback function is adding the features to the GeoJson Layer you created without calling the style function. Try to update your code between line 116 - 124 to something like this below: $.ajax({ dataType: 'json', url: 'atl_metro.geojson', success: ...


1

There are at least two alternatives. The first one is to use the -clipsrc parameter. ogr2ogr -f "ESRI Shapefile" test.shp world_boundaries_m.shp -clipsrc "POLYGON (( 1308807.8548639829 2728968.1094570993, 823671.391414903 169260.41200850534, 3897264.203215087 209607.73328746122, 2782801.7002406875 2976763.0370215555, 1308807.8548639829 2728968.1094570993 ...


1

The documentation is not that clear, I had the same issue and needed to dig around in the topojson test scripts to work it out. https://github.com/mbostock/topojson/blob/master/test/feature-test.js You do it by passing a function as an option, like this: var geojson = ...


1

For a one-time conversion I would have used the accepted answer from @Sasa Ivetic but needed something real-time, and Terraformer worked decently for that. Unfortunately it's only for single features by default, so for multiple features you need to loop through the array and add an ID to each feature: var FeatureCollection = { type: "FeatureCollection", ...



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