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20

The geometric network is used to model things like utility networks, drainage, or any other network where the commodity does not have free will. Network dataset is used for networks where "an agent" can choose the path, such as transportation networks. There a description here (scroll down to the What is a network? section): http://help.arcgis.com/en/...


6

Sometimes it is better not to use out of the box solution. This is why I suggest Populate X an Y fields in node layer, convert them to integers, say cm. Create string field and populate it by concatenating string represantations of integers. Do similar thing in links table for first point in the shape. Join nodes table to links using latest created fields ...


5

First, let me say that I share your frustration with the inability to set flow direction where there is a split with multiple sinks. As far as I can see, you have set up your dataset, layers and network properly. The explanation that I received is that when there are 2 or more sinks on a common junction, each sink potentially has the ability to draw flow ...


4

Try finding all polylines where IGeometryCollection.GeometryCount > 1. I think the example for calculating vertex count could be adapted to do this with the field calculator.


4

From the look of your screen shot it looks like you have used the utility network analyst toolbar and the Trace Upstream option? So... not ArcHydro? If this is correct then click on the down arrow next to the word Analysis and select options. Under the results tab set results format to selection. This will select the polylines and you can compute the total ...


4

To my knowledge there is no tool that can do what you are asking, this needs to be done in a programmatic way. If you have VBA installed and licensed then the following code will select indeterminate edges. It assumes the geometric network is the first layer in your TOC and you need to edit the line to update it with the name of your featuredataset (current ...


4

My guess is that is has been removed from the Processing Toolbox. You can still access v.net from GRASS tools. From QGIS 2.10 onwards, you have to manually select QGIS to start with GRASS, you can do this from the Start menu. The GRASS menu is available from the Plugins menu: And v.net should be available in the GRASS Tools:


4

Odds are it has finished, and finished properly. You don't have any outputs on your tool, thus the script tool wont return anything to your ArcMap session. In most Trace models/scripts I've seen, you need to Select Data to pull out whatever child element you want, then its good to run Copy Features on that item. The output of CopyFeatures should be passed ...


3

A polyline is closed if from and to points are the same. So you could test this in a new field: field calculator : Python codeblock def IsClosed(shp): if (shp.firstpoint.x == shp.lastpoint.x) and (shp.firstpoint.y == shp.lastpoint.y) : return 1 else: return 0 result IsClosed(!Shape!)


3

I found a procedure to do this described step-by-step at the ArcGIS Discussion Forums. I recommend that you use that to perform each step manually first, and at the same time use Copy Python Snippet in the Geoprocessing | Results window to start building the Python script for automation. I would use Python by preference but it may also be amenable to ...


3

Short answer to the question "Can we create relationship classes based on a geometric network?" Relationships yes, relationship classes no. Long answer: A relationship class as defined by ESRI deals with how attributes inside fields relate to each other in two or more tables. A relationship class can be one to one, one to many or many to many. It can be ...


3

When working with Geometric networks I find it is best to specify either a source or a sink not both. Here is Esri help section on this topic In utility network applications, knowing the direction of flow along network edges can be essential. The commodity that flows through the network—water, electricity, and oil—has no will of its own. The network ...


3

Yep, turns out I wasn't honoring the wisdom of the beginner's mind and I jumped right to an assumption that my problem was way more complex than simply not having run the Set Flow Direction tool. Entries in the attribute table of the NHDFlowline file suggest that "WITH_DIGITIZED_DIRECTION" is the right parameter to go with - and it seems to check out ...


3

There are errors that one can get due to several wrong bits. Please refer to the help page Identifying geometric network build errors. Most often these errors have to do something with errors in features' geometry. I would start with: 1) Click Customize > Toolbars > Geometric Network Editing. The Geometric Network Editing toolbar is added to ArcMap. 2) ...


3

After making a lot of testing, I found that the most accurate way to detect geometric network actions(such as connect, disconnect) in an IObjectClassEvents::OnChange event is to use the interfaces IRowChanges and IFeatureChanges to determine if something changed. Private Function NetworkConnectivityChanged(ByVal obj As ESRI.ArcGIS.Geodatabase.IObject) ...


3

If you have set the flow direction as @ChrisW mentions then the polylines should be flowing in a source to sea direction. Place your flag at the green location then using the Utility Network Analysts tool bar set Trace task to Trace upstream and solve. The trick here is before you do the trace go into the options section under the Analysis dropdown on the ...


3

You can not set a flag as a model (or gp tool) parameter. However, you can use a point feature class instead of a set of flags. Therefore if you select some features of that point feature class the tool will just take those selected ones to the account. So, use "Trace Geometric Network" geoprocessing tool with your model and set the Flags parameter with ...


3

Here is the snippet: IApplication app = ... UID uidUtilNet = new UIDClass() { Value = "esriEditorExt.UtilityNetworkAnalysisExt" }; var m_utilNetExt = app.FindExtensionByCLSID(uidUtilNet) as IUtilityNetworkAnalysisExt; nax = m_utilNetExt as INetworkAnalysisExt; for (int i = 0; i < nax.FeatureLayerCount; i++) { IFeatureLayer featureLayer = nax....


3

The Incremental Network Loader tool works for file geodatabases and personal SDE instances, but appears to have a bug for loading into SDE's, default or version. We're reporting this bug to ESRI. Alternatively, I found two other methods for accomplishing the data load into my SDE version: Append Tool - quick and new features were snapped to the geometric ...


3

If you have PostGIS installed, you will be able to read the database the same way as you would read an SDE-enabled/"Enterprise" geodatabase that uses ESRI's st_geometry libraries instead of PostGIS. Create a new database connection, specify the server name, database name, and the user credentials, and you should be good to go. You can create a new database ...


2

If the end points are not marked as such, you will have to find a definition that can unambiguously identify an end point. Depending on your geometry, that may be next to impossible, because an algorithm cannot tell whether the points y | A B C D +----------x represent a simple line A-B-C-D or a polyline A-B C-D unless you have a clear criterion ...


2

I'm sure you're aware of the nature of Open Street Map - it's a user collected and edited resource. If you're going to use this kind of information it would be largely down to you to fix these - and in the spirit of things update the information! If you want a relatively clean network for analysis straight away, I'd suggest TIGER. ... but I think you'd ...


2

It's not going to be as easy as you expect. Firstly you need a data source. Your best option for this is OpenStreetMaps' Database. But if you take the entire world, the data is in 100s of GBs. Secondly, you will need a source for your cities. You will need a polygon source, which indicates the boundary of the city, so that you can then select the streets ...


2

ArcPy is not and was never intended to be functionally equivalent to ArcObjects. This is one of those things I think you need ArcObjects for. You will probably want to look into .NET/Java add-in development or, what I think would be cool and assuming you are at 10.1, is using Python add-ins and ArcObjects in Python. Don't think I've seen anyone make one ...


2

This is a fairly standard Computer Science algorithm. I'd think it uses something like the optimal algorithms described on this page about looking for loops in a linked list.


2

For each line, you could create the from point using "feature vertices to point". Then you get the spatial join between the man hole and the from points (with INTERSECT), with a join_count field. If you have one intersect, this is OK, zero intersect means that you you don't have line starting from your mahole and 2 intersect mean that both lines end in the ...


2

See if these links help you out in your search: GIS for Gas GIS for Pipeline


2

I don't understand exactly what you're asking. Read this to learn about the different replication types: http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Replication_types/003n000000t6000000/ A checkout will either be a personal or file geodatabase. It should look and feel the same as editing from an SDE database. It's just a copy of the SDE data ...


2

Ok a lot of questions, so I will start with a general hint: What you are looking for is just a 'routing graph' for a geodata set (here: OSM). As you say this graph needs to fullfil certain properties (as connectivitiy, level of detail, ...) but IMHO your cell approach sounds a bit complicated. There are existing solutions to turn OSM raw data into graph ...


2

This is a known problem and there is an ArcGIS 10.1 SP1 for (Desktop) Geometric Network Reconcile Patch to resolve it.



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