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0

I'll just use intersect. Should have known that the tool can intersect on a single layer.


0

This observation goes back to 2010. If a spatial reference isn't specified, then you will get lower precision results. See https://geonet.esri.com/thread/10256 for starters. The examples are more extensive. There are even more in subsequent years. Specifying a floating point input has no impact, so rule that out as a thought. >>> import arcpy ...


2

Assuming you have at least PostgreSQL version 9.3, you can use a few JSON functions and operators to extract the relevant parts of the GeoJSON specification required by ST_GeomFromGeoJSON to create geometries. Try the following, where you can replace the JSON in the top part: WITH data AS (SELECT '{ "type": "FeatureCollection", "features": [ { ...


0

You can't calculate distances accurately in 3857. (previously known as 900913 or 3785) Well... can't is a strong word, so let's say that it's very difficult and there are easier/faster methods. The way web Mercator projection is designed makes it non-conformal; scale is a function of latitude. To calculate distances accurately, you would first need to ...


1

Usually you would ask the features to give you their schema using: SimpleFeatureType schema = collection.getSchema(); You can then use that to generate the Oracle schema to write the data into.


2

They are inverted (width, height). Try this: . . . for row in range(height): for col in range(width): . . . Editing Note: I edited your code: from osgeo import gdal from PyQt4.QtCore import * from qgis.analysis import QgsRasterCalculator, QgsRasterCalculatorEntry from qgis.core import QgsVectorLayer, QgsField, QgsMapLayerRegistry, QgsFeature, ...


0

if IPolyLine was used. you have to only set zAware to true to solve this problem. Dim newSegCollection As ISegmentCollection = New Polyline Dim zAware As IZAware = CType(newSegCollection, IZAware) zAware.ZAware = True then you can set z for FromPoint and ToPoint for each line in your IPolyLine shape. and if you want to set same z for all lines in ...


0

I'm not sure I see the point of filtering all of your geometries and writing them to a feature class. It's true that a Microstation cell is (or can be) made up of multiple geometry types. However, Microstation sees them as one object. If you filter all of your geometries and write them all to points, you're going to end up with duplicates. A better ...


-1

Convert your DGN to a DXF and then use the tool convert CAD to Vector.


2

When you have a record but no geometry it's known as a null geometry. The quick fix while in an Edit Session is to select the record/row in question and use the Replace Geometry tool on the Advanced Editing toolbar. This will allow you to create a point to replace the null. It works on points, lines, and polygons, and can replace both null and exisiting ...


2

Here's a solution works with lines and polygons but not points (for that see @ChrisW's answer): the Continue Feature tool from Edit Vertices toolbar. (Doesn't help Amy, but maybe someone else later). start editing, open the feature class attribute table select a has-attribute-only record pan/zoom to correct location r-click on map, select Edit Vertices, ...


6

Use field calculator (Python) on shape field, e.g.: arcpy.Point(1747952,5907660) If you know coordinates of this point. This is extension of original answer. Create a copy of the layer in table of content and and call it 'points'. Select correct point in 'points. Use field calculator (Python) on shape field for record with missing geometry: def ...


1

I've not tried this personally in this exact situation, but you should theoretically at least be able to add a new point at the correct location (leaving the attributes blank). Then go to the attribute table and select both rows (the newly created point without attributes and the corresponding attribute record without a point). Then go to the Editor ...


0

If you have X/Y data in your table, export the same table with the new records. Right click this table and "Display X, Y Events". You should have a new file with all your points! Export as needed.


2

In short: use ST_Dump, which will break your MULTIPOINT into its constituent parts. Then sort descending by ST_Y(geom) and get the first row. Here's a query that works on my PostGIS: SELECT ST_AsText(geom) FROM ST_Dump(ST_GeomFromText('MULTIPOINT(2 5, 3 1, 4 0)')) ORDER BY ST_Y(geom) DESC LIMIT 1


1

Solution: Make sure that the SRID's in the geometries match. The SQL MSDN Documentation states: STContains always returns null if the spatial reference IDs (SRIDs) of the SqlGeometry instances do not match. And sure enough, I get null. When I defined the polys I gave them an SRID of 0, so they matched and the query worked as expected. In my second ...



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