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This helped me find out distance from point to polygon. But after performing the Join the distance is displayed in decimal degrees (units of target layer). How do I display it in meter or kilometer?


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The ST_ClusterWithin and ST_ClusterIntersecting functions in PostGIS first collect all input geometries into a Postgres array before doing their processing. Since the size of this array is proving to be a limitation, you can process this dataset only if you can reduce the total size of this array. Some options for doing this: Use a GROUP BY clause to ...


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I doubt there is anything simple you can do. I am sure you could come up with something iteratively adding the adjacent polygons with some logic using the required area and the area of the individual adjacent polygons. If you wanted to get fancier and have the script make better decisions you could also incorporate the length of the shared border. I just ...


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## Iterate through each of the buildings That should be a single comment sign (#), not a double one, otherwise, it tries to parse it as if it was a parameter, and it fails BTW, you do not need to add the script from file. Just save it to the scripts folder, and it will be automatically added to the toolbox Hope this helps!


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You need to right-click the output of the script and choose Intermediate. More info about that here, at Esri Help. UPD: if the Intermediate option is greyed out, you have to make sure these things are true: The parameter for your output table in the Python script tool is Optional/Required (not Derived). You have the output table actually connected as ...


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You can use the IGpValueTableObject to be Using value tables: A value table is a flexible object that can be used as input for a multivalue parameter. Examples of multivalue parameter values focus on the text value of the parameter that can become difficult to use when there are numerous values with complex paths. The value table is used to ...


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There seems to be some serious issues with your data excluding the CRS factor. As you have mentioned, the Clip tool works but Intersect does not. As a workaround: Follow the answer provided by @wiltomap to reproject the shapefiles to the same CRS. Use the Clip tool with the buffer layer as your Input vector tayer and the town layer as your Clip layer ...


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This is a CRS issue. The CRS of layer named 300m_buffer_wgs84 is EPSG:7405, OSGB 1936 / British National Grid. What I suggest you to do is: Save this layer as another layer (change name) and specify CRS with EPSG:4326 (WGS84) before validating. Launch QGIS and disable On-the-fly reprojection (Settings > Options > CRS > Don't enable 'on the fly' ...


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The 300m_buffer_wgs84 file is not WGS84, but EPSG 7405


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Ok, the script is fine. You can re-use it The problem was projection redefinition between personalized and standards 10.x ESRI projections. My start data set was redefined and didn't work. I tested untouched data sets with a personalized projection and it worked well. Finally I'll keep playing personalized and tackle redefinition when I'll be ready.


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Probably your output was based on temporary data. Mark the output as a parameter so you can define the output location and make sure it is not marked as intermediate when you right click on it. Post a screenshot of your tool processes.


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I would start here: library(raster) g <- getData('GADM', country='BRA', level=1) plot(g) You can extract the coordinates from g, but that is probably putting the horse behind the cart if you want to make a map. xy <- geom(g)


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The default location for geoprocessing output in ArcGIS is in a geodatabase in your My Documents folder: My Documents\ArcGIS\Default.gdb You can browse to this using ArcCatalog or Add Data in ArcMap. If you have run the tool from within ArcMap it may even have added the output as a layer inside your current map.


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On the Geoprocessing menu, see the Results option. This will open a new window which lists the geoprocessing results from the Current Session. Right-click on the top line of the results and choose Open - this will show you the parameters which were used in the geoprocessing session, including the location of the output data.


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I ended up doing it a different way, but stumbled on the subtype in <Item> declaration in toolbar tag--and it exposes the subtype. <Toolbars> <Toolbar id="gse_id" caption="gse caption" showInitially="true"> <Items> <Item refID="esriGeoprocessingUI.GPSystemToolCommand" subtype="1" ...


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Maybe ST_ConvexHull will help you. See this snippet to understand how it works http://www.bostongis.com/postgis_concavehull.snippet


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This may not be the fastest solution... But I usually just cheat by joining all the features of the other table. Create table blah as select d.* from data_i_want d, (select st_union(geom) geom from not_in_here) n where st_disjoint(d.geom,n.geom); Nice and snappy if the not_in_here table isn't that complex.


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Section 9.9. Raster Band Statistics and Analytics is all about getting statistics from pixel values http://postgis.net/docs/manual-2.1/RT_reference.html#RasterBand_Stats You can get the count, the sum, the mean, the stddev, the min and the max with ST_SummaryStats(). If your raster is tiled, use ST_SummaryStatsAgg() to aggregate the stats from many tiles.


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I've cobbled something together which helps a little bit: Create a "Results Log.mxd" whose only purpose is to store results, there are no feature classes or map layers. From the ArcMap or ArcCatalog sessions containing notable work: Rename result as makes sense to your workflow Drag and drop to Results Log >> Results >> Shared. Caveats: It's a good idea ...


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I found a workaround for persistent rename: Rename a process Drag to “Shared” Save mxd In the Shared container the process retains the tool name, e.g. "Append", but automatically get's a new parent with the wanted label. Think ahead because once in Shared it can't be renamed again. After close and re-open:



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