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1

Without more exact knowledge about your source route system and event overlays it is difficult to say exactly what is going on. It would appear that your route is not being created with a starting measure of 0, since negative measures should normally not be created by these tools unless those measures exist on the route. The Create Route tool can generate ...


3

While I'm a big user of both shapely and fiona, I wouldn't go this approach. This is a task of writing an effective SQL statement. Using ogr2ogr with an SQLITE dialect, you can process this from a command line. Change directory to one before the shapefiles, so that all of the shapefiles are in one directory called data. OGR treats directories of shapefiles ...


2

Some issues in your code: you only use correctly one table as input whereas, you should use both input bufSHP and ctSHP you want to make an intersection between a list of shape and a filename with shapes.intersection(ctSHP) whereas you have to do an intersection between two shape elements See below a possibility, I choose to use Rtree to optimize, ...


-1

Can you use Spatial Join to stamp the IDs into the polygons?


1

Choose a suitable UTM grid for your area (see https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTM-Koordinatensystem#mediaviewer/File:LA2-Europe-UTM-zones.png ), probably 32 or 33 (north). Save your layer in the chosen UTM coordinate system. Use the buffer tool on the new UTM layer.


3

You have to use a projected CRS like UTM (for your part of the world) to get real circles and meters as units. Please do not use Google/Web Mercator, it does not use real meters as units (only at the aequator).


1

There is no guarantee that a model exported to Python will run without debugging and, depending on your model's complexity, that debugging effort could be considerable. I would wrap your model into a very short Python script that consists of little more than arcpy.ImportToolbox(). For example, if you have a TestModel (without an alias) in ...


2

Well I figured it out. I ran a repair geometry on the input polygon feature class. Problem solved. I should have tried that first!


2

If you don't already have this set, I would setup the Geoprocessing Options like so: Also, you could always programmatically close the ArcMap document and open it up again. You could do this from python or even a .bat script. Edit: From this thread, it appears that you can disable logging via arcpy.gp.logHistory = False but it doesn't appear to have any ...


4

ArcGIS Snap tool will do this for you (standard and up license level). You need to fill in what type of snapping you are looking for in the Type column. Also the Distance of the snapping. Also keep in mind this is a tool with no outputs, so make copies of your input data before trying.


0

I have experienced exactly the same problem earlier and was looking for the solution on the Internet. It seems as using pypyodbc library works much better. I was able to publish a GP service and call stored procedures & perform multiple SQL statements obtaining as a result object record sets without any problem. Pypyodbc is a pure Python ODBC interface ...


5

Use the Delete Identical tool. There's also a Find Identical tool to check which features have duplicates you can use first, if you want.


2

It is probably some quite large datasets you have to handle, and therefore i would perhaps not suggest a WPS solution, since you would be transferring data with the process request. WPS 1.0 has limited capabilites for asyc. requests - which will be enhanced in version 2.0 - making the solution with WPS a little more feasible i guess - but for now and in ...


1

You could add a field to your feature class and attribute based on what buffer they fall in. Then you would be able to query the feature class for each buffer distance.


2

You can create square and rectangular grids using the Vector Grid tool under Vector > Research Tools > Vector Grid. To get the required coordinates, I suggest using the Coordinate Capture tool and then input the Xmin, Xmax, Ymin, Ymax from these captured points. Note that the units will be in the coordinate system currently used, so you might want to ...


1

Use a spatial join but a ONE TO MANY relationship. So if a square intersects say 3 hexagons then you get 3 squares back one for each hexagon. Then use the Summary statistics tool to group by square ID and select MAXIMUM hexagon area and first hexagon ID. This creates a table of square ID, maximum area of hexagon and hexagon ID. Then its a sequence of joins ...


2

Take a look on pyWPS, an OGC Web Processing Service implementation. Its easy to install on a python environment. Most of the examples use GRASS GIS as pyWPS only implements the interface for remote handling, but it is possible to use any GIS backend to do the actual processing work. So check out the gallery first, to get an idea what is possible and ...


0

You could combine both layers by adding a binary column (0,1) to identify whether the building is from X or Y. From there using GeoDa you could identify local spatial auto-correlation (clustering) and determine whether it was high-low (one layer clustered around the other layer) low-high (the inverse) or high-high or low-low (self-clustering). User's guide ...


1

There is some documentation which I am assuming that you are unaware of because you do not reference it in your question. I encourage you to read the page entitled Authoring geoprocessing tasks with Python scripts, and in particular the section headed Tool validation code which says: If you have experience writing script tools, you may be providing ...


2

Nope. Regarding organizing the parameters, the closest you could come in doing this is to organize your parameters into categories. See the ArcGIS Help Documentation for defining parameters in a Python Toolbox for more information (Parameter categories are at the very bottom of the page). In terms of updating your parameters, you can't make them ...


1

To deploy a custom .NET tool, you would need to document the tool first. Refer to A quick tour of documenting tools and toolboxes for the steps. However, to document a DLL-based custom tool, you need to enable Item Description first. Consult Enable ArcMap to create documentation for custom geoprocessing tools for details. After editing the registry as ...


5

Right click "Messages" there should be a copy button that "Copies execution messages into the clipboard for pasting into anything that accepts text, such as a text editor." Clicking "view" brings up a window within which you can highlight and copy specific lines as you mentioned.


0

You could set up a Web Processing Service (WPS) with Zoo-project.org and GRASS GIS. For pointers, see http://grasswiki.osgeo.org/wiki/Interpolation - "Reinterpolation of 'sparse' (scattered points or lines) maps" and also http://grasswiki.osgeo.org/wiki/WPS. QGIS offers a WPS client which you can then run to use your WPS interpolation service.


0

A FOSS solution is available. GRASS has a repair geometry tool. Dirk is correct though if you have Arc then repair geometry. v.clean is the GRASS approach.


1

My quick testing, using ArcGIS 10.2.2 for Desktop on Windows 7 SP1, indicates that Intersect is faster than Spatial Join. This test, run from IDLE: import arcpy,time if not arcpy.Exists(r"C:\temp\test.gdb"): arcpy.CreateFileGDB_management(r"C:\temp","test.gdb") if arcpy.Exists(r"C:\temp\test.gdb\fnPoly100"): ...



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