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Here's an example of technique I mentioned in the my comment to your question. Reading a CSV and populating a feature class with its values can be easy. The script assumes the Latitude field is the 1st column and Longitude field is the 2nd column. You can tweak the coordinate system in the code to something other than WGS84, tweak the field types, etc. # ...


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I've found a model builder model to be fastest with: "Make X Y Event Layer" followed by "Feature class to Feature Class"


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I ended up doing the following: The directory on the server is called "C:/arcgisserver/directories/arcgisoutput" so i simply created the same folder structure on my machine for the locale run. The problem one will encounter when doing that is that arcgis changes your code when it publishes it, one of the changes being changing paths - so you have to trick ...


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I've got a sinuosity and gradient toolbox that you may end up wanting to take a look at - http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=c8eb4ce1384e45258ccba1b33cd4e3cb


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Unfortunately, you can only publish a tool once it has been successfully run. See this (older) thread with ESRI's reasoning for imposing this restriction: https://geonet.esri.com/thread/54637


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In the world of hydrology and geomorphology, there is indeed a metric that we use to classify/quantify the "curviness" of a river......sinuosity. Sinuosity is simply a measure of the actual path length of the river divided by the shortest path length (straight line distance). So, you could measure the sinuosity of the river as a whole (actual path length ...


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I'm not a hydrologist, so I'm not aware of any metrics/heuristics that should likely govern your methods, but here's a stream-of-consciousness response for something that would be fun to try. Interpolate points along the line: First, I'd interpolate points along the line with an equal-length, short spacing according to a minimal granularity where the ...


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I am going to assume these xyz files have the same headers as the first line. If there is no header in your xyz files, delete the lines indicated with #remove me if no header in the code below. Place your xyz files in the same directory. Then you can iterate through the files with os.listdir. From there use open to open each file and write each line into a ...


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If the XYZ files are just delineated text files, you could just copy/paste in notepad or some such editor. Six files doesn't seem like many. Sometimes you don't need to automate... However, I think there are a few options that won't require ArcPy. Things that come to mind: Load the data into a new feature class or table. Try the append tool. Try ...


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The tool which should help you to accomplish this is Polygon Neighbors (Analysis): Creates a table with statistics based on polygon contiguity (overlaps, coincident edges, or nodes). Once you know a polygon's neighbors you can work on whether adding attribute values from one or more of them to those of the original polygon will meet your criteria. ...


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It sounds like you want to buffer your point layer? Load your data as Joseph describes Go to the menu Vector/Geoprocessing Tools/Buffer(s) In the dialogue box choose your input layer (possibly only accepts shp - so you might need to save your csv as shp first) then set your buffer distance and specify an output file. Other parts of the dialogue box are ...


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You can import your csv file with lat/lon data by going to Layer > Add Delimited Text Layer and check the 'Points coordinates' as the geometry definition: Once imported, you can change the style by double-clicking the layer to access its properties, go to the Style tab, select the Simple marker option and change its options such as colour, size etc. You ...


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I assume you want to use a geoprocessing service in your web app along with your map service. I give the Creating GP Services presentation at the ESRI UC, and show a demo of this. This is what I'd consider the least likely scenario in terms of GP services consuming data, thus it's not well documented. That said, you can use a geoprocessing service to work ...


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Try using pip to install the package. Follow the link to install pip and then use the command "pip install pygeoprocessing" It will even download the prerequisites for you. But I had to do a bit of fiddling around to get the instal to work. Luckily the error messages during the install told me what was missing. In my case I had to download first install ...


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Below is the model that will connect to an Access 2010 database table and create a point layer from the data. You need to create a Table View and feed that into the Make XY Event Layer tool. This is an in memory layer which can be used in processing but if you want to create a permanent version you need to save it, copy features will do this. When you ...


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I believe this tool will accomplish what you are trying to do. From description: "Converts closed polygons (commonly used for representing roads and rivers) to centerlines using the Thiessen polygon method. There is a Densify Distance parameter that you will likely need to adjust to optimize your results. Some post-processing editing is probably also ...



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