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15

Take a look at my answer on this post. Make sure your featureNS value is in the "Edit Workspace Page under Namespace URI" in your GEOSERVER. Do not use something as generic as "http://postgis.org". Use something like "http://yourdomain/application/catalogLayer" or something unique like that. You can make this URI up, just make it unique. You ...


8

A Smarter Planet had a great blog entry on why Watson got the answer wrong. Also, Bruce Upbin wrote specifically about Watson performing a spatial operation: There are many reasons Watson is good at Jeopardy!. It has something like a million pages of documents and a geospatial database in its memory. It can run the board on categories like ...


8

While I can't answer for anyone else, and the company is not large that I work for, we have had a lot of success with using SQL Server 2008 and it's spatial capabilities. Because I work for a forestry company, the spatial side of things is very important to our business. If you are just doing nearest neighbour type analysis, then I would suggest giving the ...


7

If you had the polygon bounding boxes stored in something like a quad tree then you could use that to quickly determine which polygons to check. At the very minimum you could just see if the point is inside each polygon bounding box as opposed to doing a full point in polygon for each polygon. Personally I'd setup a web service which would cache the ...


6

As with almost all such questions, the optimal approach depends on the "use cases" and how the features are represented. The use cases are typically distinguished by (a) whether there are many or few objects in each layer and (b) whether either (or both) layers allow for precomputing some data structures; that is, whether one or both of them is sufficiently ...


6

Hekevintran, Your first query is using an index just not the spatial one. See the Index Scan using geoplanet_place_pkey. So it's more efficient for it to use the id key since you are doing an ORDER by the column and your spatial filter covers the whole table. The spatial index is not used because your ST_Expand is too big. You have a geometry but its ...


6

It depends on what you mean by "center point". If you're trying to show all of the polygons from a center point you'd need two things: 1. the center point, and 2. the zoom level/scale that would show you all of the polygons. One way to get that centerpiont would be to add the polygons to a geometry collection ...


5

This is an example of what harry is talking about. var bounds = new OpenLayers.Bounds(); for (var x in _layer.selectedFeatures) { bounds.extend(_layer.selectedFeatures[x].geometry.getBounds()); } //var center = bounds.getCenterLonLat(); <-- you don't really need this if you want to zoom. But it will give you the center lat long coords. ...


4

Check out this blog post on reddit: IBM Watson Research Team Answers Your Questions Nothing specific to geography but there is a general description of how Watson arrives at an answer to questions.


4

Check out the Learning page on the Safe Software web site. There are tutorials for both the basic Desktop product (I recommend doing that first) and then one for Spatial Databases. Those two should get you going in no time. We (I work at Safe) don't put prices out there because there are so many licensing options (and resellers) and we want to make sure ...


3

PowerPoint KMZ/KML to Google Earth (via inserted object and hyperlinking) Save a Google Earth .kmz file on your computer and insert it as an object. When the Insert Object dialogue pops up choose Create From File and browse for the selected file. In PowerPoint, right click the new object and choose Action Settings. In the new dialogue, select Object ...


3

It appears that the object I was provided was defined "inside-out" and that in order to get it to show up properly, I need to use the ReorientObject() method to fix my shape. I found this information on a blog post by Alastair Aitchison ...


3

Addition info on Licensing - Smallword version is the most costly Smallworld Edition The most complete FME Desktop edition available, with support for all 250+ formats plus the ability for users to read and load data into Smallworld. Learn more about FME support for Smallworld. Oracle Edition Load data directly into Oracle Spatial and get support for ...


2

You will need to create the table to match the schema you want to load the data to in SQL2008. Then you will need to drag the fields from the Reader to the writer so it knows what attributes to match to what locations.There are some great samples you can see on FMEPedia that show you the power of the software and you can do a specific search for KML there ...


2

First thing to check: is your server / test webpage on 'medford.opengeo.org'? If it isn't, you won't be able to access WFS because of the Same Origin Policy. You can technically use a proxy to fix this. (though in my opinion this is just a case of WFS being a poorly designed protocol)


2

While the question has been answered very well (and this is very late), here's an "aesthetic" solution for those getting here via Google (like me) that I just did recently for a Powerpoint: (1) Insert screenshot of the KML in Google Earth to the Powerpoint (2) Right click the screenshot to add Hyperlink...


2

Personally, I would approach this from a database perspective rather than either a GIS perspective or a spreadsheet perspective. I would have one table of boreholes. This would contain the fields of BoreholeId, and Geometry. Records would obviously be the values. I would then have another table of BoreholeData. This would contain the fields of ...


1

You can put Google Earth in your PowerPoint presentations with Shape2Earth.


1

ESRI Maps for Office is another solution to present geospatial data in Powerpoint. It allows you to use web maps from ArcGIS Online as dynamic slides within any PowerPoint presentation.


1

PostGIS has the function ST_Shift_Longitude(). If I understand your question, you want the BBOX to be between 143E and 145W ? So something like (not tested): SELECT ST_Contains( ST_Shift_Longitude( GeomFromText('POLYGON((143 51, 143 66, -145 66, -145 51, 143 51))', 4326)), ST_Shift_Longitude(GeomFromText('POINT(144 52)', 4326)) ) should return '1' (true), ...


1

I kind of do the same. I store all my hydrogeologic data in a SpatiaLite database. One table with general data (and geometry) for each borehole and then additional tables related to each borehole. I handle both borehole logs (non-transient data as e.g. stratigraphy) and time-varying observations (as groundwater level, water chemistry and more). I also ...


1

Munzilla, I feel compelled to question why you would create polygons for the world's countries. It's got to be a big performance hit. If your reason is simply to style the OSM map there are better ways. But please tell us what you're trying to achieve to better help you. I'm interested in your end result goal if you can share that with us. Update Based ...


1

Your problem is that you have the prefix on the feature name and a namespace this is confusing GeoServer (and/or OpenLayers). Try: featureType : "parks", I have some WFS examples at http://ian01.geog.psu.edu/geoserver/www/wfs/index.html with commented source code that you can study.


1

If you query the MBR (minimum bBounding Rectangle) of all of the polygons, you automatically have the centre point. So start there, on loading, check what polygonsd have been selected and either query the MBR of them all, or get the min/max x/y and work from there.


1

You might want to check this out: https://github.com/pharylon/kml2sql Free, open source, and easy to use. FME is like a swiss army knife. It has a lot of features, but if all you want is to upload a KML file to SQL server, all you need is KML2SQL.


1

In postgis ST_Intersects uses indexes to first find if the point is inside the bounding box of the polygon and then makes a recheck to see if it really is inside the polygon. That is fast, often very fast. If you have stored your data in PostGIS there should be no doubt that the database is the right place to do the computation. In other cases you will ...


1

The spatial functionality available in SQL Server does (amongst other things) just that. Find things that are nearby. Why re-invent the wheel? its optimized, and then you can always use all the other functions to make further analysis. So I would say-yes- its definitely worth looking into. As for case studies a quick qoogle search revealed this and this. And ...


1

At its simplest formulation and over reasonably short distances and using a cartesian coordinate system, you can use the Pythagorean theorem to implement dead reckoning. Since it's an assignment, here are the formulas, the rest you can work out yourself. distance = sqrt( (x2-x1)^2 + (y2-y1)^2) slope = (y2-y1)/(x2-x1) slope = tan(trajectory * (PI/180)) ...



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