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3

Once your geotiff is loaded into QGIS, right click on the image in the layers list, select properties. In 'Render type' select 'Singleband pseudocolor', then in the box on the right, choose a colour map you like the look of, and click on 'Classify'. You can tweak other settings here to get the desired affect e.g. manually changing the range of each colour ...


3

To cut an image (tif file) by using GDAL python library, and without gdalwarp utility, you need to find row and column raster indexes of top point [p1=(minX, maxY)] and bottom point [p2=(maxX, minY)]. The formulas, based in your code, are: i1 = int((p1[0] - xOrigin) / pixelWidth) j1 = int((yOrigin - p1[1] ) / pixelHeight) i2 = int((p2[0] - xOrigin) / ...


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And like all ArcGIS problems, fully restarting my computer and connections has fixed everything. Thanks again for those who looked into this.


2

I think I may have figured it out. If one resets the Nodata value in the original files to -9999 with: gdalwarp -dstnodata -9999 tmean1_16.tif tmean1_16_error999.tif and then uses gdalmerge specifying both the input nodata value and the output nodatavalue: gdal_merge.py -v -n -9999 -a_nodata -9999 -o tmean1_06_16.tif tmean1_06_error999.tif ...


1

From memory, the RAT/colour table for a tif is either stored in a .dbf or .aux.xml file. You could try deleting those if they exist.


1

My solution was to run a /usr/bin/gdal_calc.py -A input.tif --outfile=output.tif --calc="A*1" --NoDataValue=0 --co="compress=lzw"


1

You might get unexpected results because your dataset crosses the 180° meridian. As a consequence, the tile is squeezed around the globe when reprojected to WGS84. To avoid that, you have to cut the raster data at the +/- 179.99° meridian. The following batch works with pure GDAL: gdal_translate HDF4_EOS:EOS_GRID:"MOD11A1.A2004091.h34v10.005.2007261231833....


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This sounds like a perfectly reasonable thing to do with mapnik. You have (at least) two options to do that. The first and simplest option is to do something along the lines of (pseudo code): create a mapnik map create a style (potentially based on user input) # you can also create a style per layer append the style to the map for each file create a ...


1

Use BricsCAD, which is in fact an affordable copy of AutoCAD. This software is able to read the geocoded information of a geotiff.



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