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1

The gdalbuildvrt program isn't the right tool for this task. It's for making virtual mosaics and multiband images. I suggest this approach: Define the domain in which you want results (geotransform, rows and columns). We used to call this a "canvas" back in the day. Warp (gdalwarp, nearest neighbor) your source TIFFs to that domain, producing TIFFs with ...


1

I was able to solve the issue with geotools java library. Extracting coordinates from either tiff and shapefile, we can get points from each tiff pixel by going over tiff with pixel-size step and checking if this point is inside of shapefile geometry coordinates.


2

Here is some of my C++ code for working with triangles: Structures, in order to understand my code understanding these structures is necessary: struct CoPair // linked list of coordinates { long ID; float X; float Y; float Z; CoPair *NxtPt; }; struct Tri // linked list of triangles made from 3 CoPair { bool Active; CoPair *A; ...


0

GDAL comes with a gdal_grid utility to create a regular grid from scattered data. I'd start with this one since it seems that you are already using GDAL tools. If you have dense LiDAR data, check out LAStools, such as las2dem or lasgrid.


0

ok i guess i found the problem : 1) i change my xml to this : <coverageStore> <name>'.htmlentities($datastoreName, ENT_COMPAT).'</name> <type>GeoTIFF</type> <enabled>true</enabled> <connectionParameters> <entry ...


1

I had some damaged GeoTiff files. What happened is that a person ran the GeoTiff through Photoshop. Photoshop and most other drawing problems ignore the GeoTiff part of the tiff file and wind up bashing the spatial information in the header. You do not say what tools you have available. What I did to fix the problem was to use the coordinates that I ...


0

Compression doesn't work well in the process of generating a new file with "tiled=yes" or above a certain file size. I solved this problem as supposed by Michael: Create your hillshade by compressing it with lossless LZW. In my example, the whole planet warped with 500 meter resolution, the hillshade-500.tif consumes 131 GB. gdaldem hillshade -z 4 ...


0

If I understand your problem correctly, there may be another workaround to this as well by using the comp-op operations (which can be quite confusing). Let's say you had your #raster layer and a #shp poly layer. The shp layer is polys defining areas that you WANT to see from the raster. Anything outside the shp polys will be masked with the following ...


4

Given your error, my guess is that when you are importing the file to GRASS, it is expecting a GRASS ASCII raster format, which has a header that looks like this: north: ####.### south: ####.### east: ####.### west: ####.### rows: ####.### cols: ####.### Instead of an ArcGIS ASCII grid, which has a header that looks like ...


2

With libtiff you can't get altitude from you file. I spent a lot of time trying to do it with libgeotiff. My advice is to install GDAL. Example: GDALRasterIO( hBand_ , GF_Read , p, l, 1, 1, &pafScanline, 1, 1, GDT_Float32, 0, 0 );


0

I finally figured it out... this code assumes that the geotif is in wgs84 (4326) proj, but it works well for getting the lat long for each pixel, and the band values for each pixel (formatted as a csv here). Hope this helps. import com.spatial4j.core.io.GeohashUtils; import java.awt.geom.Rectangle2D; import org.geotools.coverage.grid.GridCoverage2D; import ...


1

In GRASS GIS, use r.in.arc for the import or simply r.in.gdal (Menu: File -> Import raster data -> Common formats import). This should read the file right away.



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