Hot answers tagged

6

The Google Earth Blog (note: this is not officially affiliated with Google) has an article here that might answer your question. It seems that some imagery is added to Google Earth and Google Maps Classic before being added to Google Maps. Edit: I'm unsure if you can point the OpenLayer plugin toward Google Maps Classic rather than Google Maps. Someone else ...


4

it is unlikely that you will be able to batch download all of Google Data. However, you can tap into Google Data using the Google Places API. If you are interested in OpenStreetMap use Overpass Turbo zoom to your area of interest with the Mapview port as the area you will download using the Bounding Box code: node ({{bbox}}); out; Of course this ...


4

WGS84 is not a projection, it is a Datum, there is a key difference between the two. You could have WGS84 in a geographic projection, or a UTM projection, or many other projections. You want to make sure that not only are you using WGS 84, but are also using the correct projection. Google Earth uses Simple Cylindrical projection with a WGS84 datum, you are ...


4

Use the CRS EPSG:3857. See below. Circle in GE Same KML as WGS 84 in QGIS Same KML again using EPSG:3857 Measure the diameter of your circle and it should be much better.


3

Install QGIS and learn basics. Big steps: Load your image. Digitalize your river. Calculate the length. Generate a model of the river and use it with the length to evaluate the volume. Use Buffer tool. Make a beautiful map layout


3

For a point feature: You'll basically need to define with a transparency prefix (see below). In your color tag referenced in your code above (ff0000ff ) the prefix ff represents 100% opaque or 0% transparent. To get to a 50% transparency, you'd need to use the hex representation of 7F as your prefix (7F0000ff) Hex Transparency Guide in Answers From ...


3

As said in the comments above, the Global Soil Information Facilities (tutorials) website maintained, amongst others, by some of the plotKML authors and contributors gives you everything you need to produce filled polygon areas. In addition to the absolutely correct solution by @Nahm above, here's a reproducible example for future queries on the topic. ## ...


3

Posting this for posterity as I have just figured out facing the same issue. Because the only answer so far is just as time-consuming as moving placemarks individually in Google Earth. Create desired folders in Google Earth, then select the multiple KML / KMZ files in Windows Explorer / File Manager and drag into the respective folders in Google Earth. ...


3

As Midavalo said, you should see Conversion tools in your Toolbox. In there, open the To KML Toolset. You want Layer to KML. Follow the instructions. If you're not seeing any of the toolboxes, I think there may be something wrong with your installation and I recommend re-installing ArcGIS.


3

The meridians in your Google Earth picture look like they are displaying at every 0.0035 degrees. It looks like you are measuring the distance between your data, which is placed correctly at 142E, and the 141.9985E meridian. The measured distance between 142E and 141.9985E is right around 170 meters. Your data looks correct, but you are validating ...


3

I have given up on my original idea to stream NMEA into Google Earth.. and found a better solution! I was able to solve this by programmatically generating KML file for each position and attitude change and then opening up an instance of Google Earth with the generated KML file as parameter. This is happening in 250ms loop which makes the transitions smooth....


2

The heights on google earth refer to EGM96 and are, therefore, Geoidal heights. The lat/long are referred to the WGS 84 ellipsoid.


2

I use GADM / DIVA-GIS's downloads: http://www.gadm.org/country http://diva-gis.org/gdata Also provides other basic data types; administrative areas, inland water, roads, rail, elevation, land cover, population, monthly climate, gazette (cities etc)...in various vector/raster formats. All can be used in QGIS. Of course the OpenStreetMap has the data ...


2

I have been using MapRight. It is web based with iOS apps, and it is extremely easy to use. It combines parcel data with powerful mapping and presentation functionalities.


2

In case anyone else has this question, I found a way at least to export an area (up to 800m x 800m per file) of buildings at once from Google Earth (well, from OSM, which is the source of most of the buildings in GE). I don't know if it takes terrain variations into account (at that resolution, inside a city there probably isn't so much variation anyways): ...


2

This tool, Export to KML developed by Kevin Martin does the work. There are some issues with the styles but at least colours and attributes are correct, and it´s plenty of options to play with the attributes, labels, etc...


2

The only way to have the same placemark appear in two folders in KML is 1) duplicate the placemark or 2) have NetworkLink in each folder reference the placemark in a separate KML file. In both cases, if both folders are visible then the placemark is duplicated on the map which may or may not be apparent. Google Earth does not remove duplicates. If user ...


2

You can use TCX converter for generating DEM from google earth. Check this Contours and DEM from Google Earth


2

With the <color> tag, as follows: <color>ff0000ff</color> The first two hex characters define the alpha band, or opacity. ff = completely solid 00 = completely translucent More info here


2

As far as I know (and I could be mistaken) there is no exact date or period of days that google waits to release their Monthly Imagery Updates. Different parts of the world are constantly being updated and you can see the areas with new imagery here: https://mapsengine.google.com/10446176163891957399-04749531680953568577-4/mapview/?authuser=0 . Also just ...


2

From the Google Developers help for Keyhole Markup Language it is clear that Google Earth will only use one KML file from a KMZ no matter how many you put into the folder you zip up to create it: Include only one .kml file. (When Google Earth opens a KMZ file, it scans the file, looking for the first .kml file in this list. It ignores all subsequent ....


2

As you've noticed Google Earth doesn't tessellate polygons. This means that you will need to tessellate your polygon on your own. You could use something like Triangle to do this: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~quake/triangle.html Here is a list of libraries which will allow you to do this. Some of them might or might not have a program to do this: http://vterrain....


2

The Answer is that you don't do something like this. Firstly, the data in Google Earth, isn't raw, and has been processed in a variety of ways, and can have locational and radiometric problems. Secondly, and more importantly, the Terms and Conditions of Google Earth, prohibit the usage of data in such a way. You are better off either purchasing such data ...


1

The article about what you can see is for Scenes from the Planet satellites, which collect data at 3-5m resolution. However, the mosaic tile you downloaded was built from a Landsat satellite, so you will only have 30m resolution, as @Kersten pointed out. You should be able to see crops with Landsat data but remember that Mosaics only contain RGB bands so ...


1

For me; in the beginning TCX worked perfectly but suddenly the same thing happend to me so i tried this; after saving your .kml file from google earth, go to http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/elevation and load the file there. Click "Convert and Add Elevation," and output as a .gpx file. Download the link that it gives you and import that into TCX Converter. Do ...


1

I think you should have a look at ESRI's new ArcGIS Earth. It is also a free application, and is in many ways comparable to Google Earth, albeit the display of some of the imagery not as sharp and detailed as in Google Earth. However, the great thing about ArcGIS Earth is that you can very easily add, and overlay, any WM(T)S service on top of the globe, ...


1

Don't use EPSG:2039 for the project CRS. As you can see, I've managed to reproduce your result. Here are possible ways to solve the issue: Set the project CRS to EPSG:3857 (WGS 84 Psuedo Mercator). This is the CRS that the Google satellite imagery is by default. It goes without saying that you should make sure it is defined that way. Setting the CRS to ...


1

"Data from GPS sources are usually in wgs1984 by default. Check that first then you can skip the reproject step. Rightclick on the layer in ArcMap and choose "Properties" click tab "Source" and check if the projected coordinate system is WGS 1984." Not directly on the fly, you need to export it to kmz then open it in Google Earth. If this dont work you need ...


1

This sounds like a job for some scripting! KMZ files are zipped KML files (rename it to .zip, and extract, to find the KML.) KML files are essentially XML files, a type of markup language which is readable in programs like Notepad++. If you open the KML file in a text editor, you get stuff like this: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <kml ...


1

Using Google Earth Pro (this is free now) Use the Measure Tool (ruler) Draw around your rooftop building as polygon save -> Polygon Measure goes to the 'Temporary Places' in the Left Table Right Click 'copy' (Ctrl + V) Using Notepad++ Paste as XML Coordinates are found in Polygon Tag as LinearRing Coordinates



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible