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1

After seeing underdark's comment, I tried using Ubuntu with QGIS 2.4. At first it didn't work, but after reinstalling openlayers, I was able to load Google Satellite and zoom in. But I couldn't zoom in past 1:2300 on Bing maps. So I did some more searching and found a post on QGIS project wiki - http://hub.qgis.org/issues/11728#change-58357 - that ...


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thank you so much, i downloaded the Global Mapper v16.0 and run it, at the end the Global Mapper v16.0 needs a license type for register, would you tell which license type should i select or would you please tell me an order number? thanks in advanced!


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This plugin for Debian lacks this problem, but does not meet terms of service of google (Oficial example). Or try this code: var map = L.map( 'map' ).setView( [ 51.505, -0.09 ], 13 ); L.tileLayer( '//mt{s}.googleapis.com/vt?x={x}&y={y}&z={z}', { maxZoom: 18, subdomains: [ 0, 1, 2, 3 ] } ).addTo( map ); var marker = L.marker( [ 51.5, -0.09 ] ...


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What you are describing is a well known issue with animation of Google basemap tiles in Leaflet, and unfortunately, I don't think there is an easy solution. The map in the fiddle uses the Leaflet Google.js plugin by Pavel Shramov. As explained in this answer by @mourner, this plugin "acts as a proxy to the original Google Maps API v3, so it doesn't work ...


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If you have two suspected spatial references for the list of coordinates, here are some steps to confirm if they are correct or not. Open up new ArcMap Add one of the ESRI general basemap WMS layers (one that has data for entire Earth) For dataframe select Properties>Coordinate System tab, change the spatial reference to one of the suspected spatial ...


1

Google maps uses WGS 84 Web Mercator. If you've tried creating your points with this coordinate system and haven't been successful, there is probably something wrong with your inputs. The commas for decimal points raises an eyebrow for me. Replace the commas with periods and see if it works.


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MapBox recently (as of appx Fall/2013) started offering an imagery service, and while it's not available to free accounts, it is available to all of their paid accounts, which start at just $5 a month. I'm impressed with the resolution they've achieved, too. This is zoomed-in to a small town in Arkansas where I used to play baseball as a kid. (Select ...


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Load your KML in to New MyMaps and you can print in friendly versions. If you have your route loaded you will be able to print. example


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This can be accomplished using a css Transform, but it doesn't look great, but it works well enough for some things. The screenshot below uses the style: transform: translate3d(-300px, -141px, 0px) on the div containing the map.


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There is no builtin functionality for this in Leaflet, and no plugin to do it that I am aware of either. You could maybe produce something like it with some CSS transform3d hack, but it would likely look pretty horrible. In general, I think OpenLayers 3 might be more suited for pseudo-3d functionality. I have not used OpenLayers 3 myself, though.


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Google's table fusion might be a good place to start. https://support.google.com/fusiontables/answer/2571232?hl=en


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The URL for the Bing Maps consumer site is documented here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn217138.aspx


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I assume that you have the Enterprise Agreement with Google (since Google Maps APIs Terms restrict you to a public website with no fee charges otherwise). The Enterprise solution is decent and if adding new points with attributes to the map and creating heatmaps are the main tasks, I can't imagine why would you need to move to a "GIS Server" at all. See ...


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I would assume that there is some sort of documentation, or bylaw in the contract stating that the services are contingent upon the capabilities of the Google API, you're the subject matter expert, I would move forward ASAP so you're not wasting his time or yours in developing a product that doesn't meet the clients needs.


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There is more than one source depending on the area of interest around the globe. Google Maps is the terrain layer, which provides a shaded relief (aka hillshade) view of the topography derived from a digital elevation model. Google has done a nice job generating a visually pleasing terrain layer, and we use it for all of our Google Maps-based ...


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There is a free online tool at Underhill's map check page I used your metes data, but started at A.4589 (the one with known coordinates) and got these results (the remaining point numbers are assumed to increase by one each time, and luckily they do match the raw data numbering): Azimuth Distance Pt# Northing Easting ...


4

As a starting point, you don't need to use geodjango for this! You could simply return unique_line_id, line_start_point_lat, line_start_point_lon, line_end_point_lat, line_end_point_lon as a json object and display these using Leaflet. You will need to structure the data to match the format required - here's an answer that explains how to load a polyline. ...


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Maybe this is a different workaround than you are thinking, but when I have had issues with the Google Maps plugin I reprojected my data into EPSG:3857 and then did all my work there, then I reprojected it back to the original projection once I finished. I've also realised when working with the plugin that sometimes the projection renders a little wonky ...



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