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For example: library(ggplot2) library(splitstackshape) df <- read.table(header=T, text=" lon lat NUM_MALES_KEPT 1 144.35 -41.51 4 2 144.35 -41.52 22 3 144.39 -41.56 3 4 144.38 -41.53 5 5 144.38 -41.52 3 6 144.37 -41.54 10") ggplot(expandRows(df, "NUM_MALES_KEPT"), aes(lon, ...


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allow access to 66.249.82.* and deny rest others for your kml file using any front end proxy servers or apache/nginx anything you use to serve kml files.


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There is the Route360 API that also works with Google Maps. https://developers.route360.net/index.html It offers quiet a few functionalities. Including different modes of transportation or the intersection of polygons As well you can add a few hundred points at once and see the result: It works for most countries in Europe and North America


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Hi I think I have calculated that 1pixel = 11.627km in straight-line; not taking into account the radius of the earth. Here the link of video that explain how: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3cvTeiMJqE&feature=youtu.be. Hope that clear your mind.


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Have you tried using the Google Maps app URL? like this one: comgooglemaps://?saddr=Google+Inc,+8th+Avenue,+New+York,+NY&daddr=John+F.+Kennedy+International+Airport,+Van+Wyck+Expressway,+Jamaica,+New+York&directionsmode=transit doc link: https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/ios-sdk/urlscheme?hl=en


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Based on all the info provided, I have build a function that gives the best z applied to a map when you want to have an horizontal line that represent N% of the displayed Map. The displayed Map is caracterised by it own pixel width. function calculateZoom(WidthPixel,Ratio,Lat,Length){ // from a segment Length (km), // with size ratio of the of the ...


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Using Google Earth Pro (this is free now) Use the Measure Tool (ruler) Draw around your rooftop building as polygon save >Polygon Measure goes to the 'Temporary Places' in the Left Table Right Click 'copy' (ctrl +v) Using Notepad++ Paste as XML Coordinates are found in Polygon Tag as LinearRing Coordinates


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it is unlikely that you will be able to batch download all of Google Data. However, you can tap into Google Data using the Google Places API. If you are interested in OpenStreetMap use Overpass Turbo zoom to your area of interest with the Mapview port as the area you will download using the Bounding Box code: node ({{bbox}}); out; Of course this ...


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Now I see that you specified "My Maps" which means you won't be editing your answer to include any code (since you don't have that ability with "My Maps"). Everything I've found from Google indicates that you aren't going to be able to do this. Evidence of inability to edit zoom level and center However, I did find this link showing a method that would work ...


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In Google Earth, the yellow thumbtack tool is your 'placemark' tool you'll notice that when you click on that tool you get a yellow placemark icon in your window with an active boundary border around it. You can click the active placemark and drag it to where your building is, you will notice that as you do so, the recorded coordinates for your placemark ...


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There should be no technical reason against that: you can use raw OSM data and calculate a route between start and destination (defined by what???) and produce a routing graph line for that as an overlay. Then choose whatever tiles you want and you are allowed to, and use those tiles as underlay. But how will you handle situations where OSM data is ...


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It looks like it might be a GeoServer bug on creating the KML. I can see that a GetMap request with image/png output works: ...


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Ideally, you should be using GeoJSON rather than your own arbitrary JSON. Then, take your Polygon geometries and create Multipolygon geometries—perhaps using the union capability of turf.js. This way, simple polygons that are in fact disconnected parts of the same multipolygon are linked. You can also do this upfront, but it's not clear how you are getting ...


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Can you modify the dataset so that each island has an admin area attribute. Then you can just get the admin area of the polygon you're hovering over; and then change colour to polygons if their admin area attribute matches (within your mouse over event)


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Depending on your preferred smartphone app you could use the Google Maps App and view your saved map there without having it to export as KML. Otherwise you can skip the GPSVisualizer and export a KML from Google Maps directly when saving the direction in My Maps: Open a new or existing map in My Maps. Click the directions icon in the toolbar. ...


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I would start here: library(raster) g <- getData('GADM', country='BRA', level=1) plot(g) You can extract the coordinates from g, but that is probably putting the horse behind the cart if you want to make a map. xy <- geom(g)


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A Bing Maps partner already exposes Bing Maps as a WMS service: http://www.onterrasystems.com/web-mapping-mapsavvy/


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In which projection is your data? When uploading data to CartoDB with a specific projection, CartoDB transforms the geometries to EPSG 4326 and also to Web Mercator for the geometry to be visualized. Most basemaps out there represent the world by following the Web Mercator projection, which is the standard in the current web mapping world. CartoDB ...


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I use GADM / DIVA-GIS's downloads: http://www.gadm.org/country http://diva-gis.org/gdata Also provides other basic data types; administrative areas, inland water, roads, rail, elevation, land cover, population, monthly climate, gazette (cities etc)...in various vector/raster formats. All can be used in QGIS. Of course the OpenStreetMap has the data ...



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