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The idea is to set the style in the script. This makes the GeoJSON more flexible than KML where this is done in the file itself. Use: map.data.setStyle and the fillColor option, like it is described in the documentation. You can even give each polygon a separate style based on your json data.


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I have found a solution to my issue and I would like to share it. I managed to export attributes (up to two) in the "save as" window when saving a vector layer. More precisely, in the "data source options" section, I have: Set as "relativeToGround" the "Altitude Mode" Wrote name of attribute I would like to export in the "DescriptionField" field Wrote ...


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The kml xml schema does not have a tag for labeling polygon features only placemarks = points. A workaround for doing this is to create a new point layer from polygon layer and in the Save vector layer as dialog define the labeling field in the NameField text box. Once you have both kml creted in GE, select File>Open to add both kml in. Alternatively, you ...


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I'm sure this function is incredibly inefficient (not to mention that it's coded very poorly -- it was written as a "once-off" quick and dirty implementation), but here's one whose results work quite well for me: CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.calc_colors( tbl text, unique_field text, neighbour_style text, search_distance real DEFAULT 0) ...


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I haven't found out yet why exactly this does not work. but if you are interested in a "quick and dirty" workaround until you have found the error you could use this: map.setCenter(new OpenLayers.LonLat(-91, 25).transform('EPSG:4326', 'EPSG:3857'),4); map.panTo(new OpenLayers.LonLat(-90, 25).transform('EPSG:4326', 'EPSG:3857')); ...


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The difference is because the Census locator is based on TIGER street files, which is not as a complete a dataset as Google Streets has. So for any given road, the TIGER streets may have an address range of 1-1000 whereas in reality the range is updated with more houses, etc. Some roads may not even exist within the TIGER files. The street segments in TIGER ...


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I looked up a little more after posting my comment. The Census is a range based geocoding service. They state... The current Geocoding Services engine requires a structure address be provided. The resulting lat/long is calculated along an address range. Google on the other hand, looks to have a variety of options in their geocoding service. I ...


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Technically you can. I did not check it in detail, but there are some polygons defined in the html source of that page. But are you allowed to download? The page says: "Copyright Tromsø parkering AS".


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You can download city boundary data from the US Census TIGER/Line shapefiles web interface (https://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/geo/shapefiles2014/main). Use the dropdown and select "Places" - you can download them for an entire state then query the attribute table for the cities you're interested in.


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Open Layer 1.3.6 finally seems to have solved the problem.


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I've been working on this myself. Through trial and error I figured out the following: @51.508506, -0.125532 -> location 3a -> zoom? 90y -> Field of View 72h -> Heading (measured from North) 90t -> Pitch data -> unknown Therefore from this street view you will get this: ...


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I just got this script to do what you want: def panToExtent(gmapsLonLat): mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument('CURRENT') dataFrame = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd)[0] lat, lon = gmapsLonLat.split(',') lat = float(lat) lon = float(lon) extent = arcpy.Extent(lon, lat, lon, lat) dataFrame.panToExtent(extent) ...


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Answering my own question here in the hope that this helps others (or my future self). In the intervening weeks since I posted the question, I was unable to find an elegant solution to this problem that could be done algorithmically in PostgreSQL. Instead, I broke the task down into constituent parts and more or less brute-forced it. For the purposes of ...


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Below is some code that should do the basics of this. import arcpy yxCoordString = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) yStr,xStr = yxCoordString.split(",") xFloat = float(xStr) yFloat = float(yStr) mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd)[0] newExtent = df.extent newExtent.XMin, newExtent.YMin = xFloat - 0.5, yFloat - 0.5 ...


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I've had good luck using the 6-color algorithm described in the introduction to Two Linear-Time Algorithms for Five-Coloring a Planar Graph. Although it's certainly possible to color a graph using fewer colors, it may not look any better than using 5 or 6. ALGORITHM 6-COLOR. Given an n-vertex planar graph G in adjacency list form, this algorithm ...


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To add values to a datebase on the fly, break it up in three steps: 1) Catch the click and position in Javascript: https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/javascript/examples/event-simple 2) Send the position to a server using Ajax: http://api.jquery.com/jquery.ajax/ 3) Save the values in the database using PHP: ...


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It is possible, but you may run against usage limits: Users of the free API: 100 elements per query. 100 elements per 10 seconds. 2 500 elements per 24 hour period. Read more at: https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/distancematrix/#Limits


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There is also a good source of styles at Snazzy Maps, a community built around creating great looking styles for Google Maps. Your might want to check it out: https://snazzymaps.com/


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You may want to take a look at PostGIS, a spatial database extender for PostgreSQL object-relational database. It adds support for geographic objects allowing location queries to be run in SQL. http://postgis.net/


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This is a long contested issue that doesn't seem to be near resolve.. http://code.google.com/p/gmaps-api-issues/issues/detail?id=3033 Apparently this was easy in v2: disableContinuousZoom() However; now - not so much.. Here's three options proposed by others: 1. CSS *{ -webkit-transition-property: none!important; ...


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To add transparency to your code you would have to modify your example like this: var map; var MY_MAPTYPE_ID = 'custom_style'; function initialize() { var options = [{ stylers: [{lightness:90}] }]; var mapOptions = { zoom: 8, center: new google.maps.LatLng(-34.397, 150.644), mapTypeControlOptions: { mapTypeIds: ...


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Checkout this tutorial. It looks like you have tons of layers so you would need to change the position of the buttons, but I think if you upload each route as an indivudal table then combine them into one single visualization it would work. Or you could add it in as a single table and then use SQL filters to display the chosen routes possibly.



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