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According to the documentation, Windows 8.x is not supported. Whether or not it will work on Windows 8.1 is a different story. Platform: PC-Intel Operating System: Windows Vista, Windows 2000, Windows XP or Windows 7 Memory: minimum 1 GB RAM, 2 GB recommended Processor: 1.6 GHz or higher 2.4 GB free disk space for Zeno Office or 200 MB for Zeno Office on ...


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The two questions are linked. The satellite (Space Segment) can predict its position because satellite orbits are relatively "smooth" motion (according to Kepler's laws) and there are tracking / initialisation information passed up to the satellites from the Control Segment. The GPS receiver (User Segment) makes 4 (or more) pseudo-range measurements. For ...


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Your hypothesis is conceptually correct. GPS is a one-way system, with your phone listening to satellites broadcasting hyper-accurate timestamps from orbiting atomic clocks. A regular GPS unit can take 10+ minutes to download the latest satellite positioning information (almanac and ephemeris) needed for triangulation. This can lead to very long delay before ...


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You are correct, Zeno Field 3.11 or the latest version 3.2 is not supported on Windows 8.x. I have personally tested version 3.2 with Windows 8 and was able to connect to the GG03 SmartAntenna and receive 1cm accuracy when using corrections from a real-time network in a current project. I did not test much beyond that, but initial testing was successful.


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GPS is a passive format that works as a receiving unit only, you can have a second device such as a phone which then sends the signal to somewhere to track the GPS device, it is probably easier to buy an existing unit that does this then to make one, but you could use radio signals, does it need to be in real time or can the location be recorded for later ...


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To work with topology using a Basic (formerly called ArcView) level license you can use map topology on your file geodatabase: A map topology creates topological relationships between the parts of features that are coincident, which allows you to simultaneously edit features that share geometry. You can create a map topology for point, line, or ...


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With OpenLayers 2 I just used a method of the OpenLayers-feature to check wether it is within a geofencing-zone.I haven't tried this with ol3. Another option would be turf: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/turf-gis-for-web-maps/ See the section"Water Fountains accessible within xxx feet". Instead of water fountains you could use your gps-position with a buffer ...


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First check this is to see if your are getting any data from the usb gps dongle on screen Try this in Python # testgps.py\ import gps, os, time session = gps.gps(host="localhost", port="2947") session.poll() session.stream() while 1: os.system("clear") session.poll() # a = altitude, d = date/time, m=mode, # o=postion/fix, s=status, y=satellites ...


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It's safe to assume that it's WGS84, that's the system that the GPS satellite system uses internally, it's the default for the NMEA standard, and in my experience it's always the default system that a consumer GPS is set to use. Some GPS units will let you change the coordinate system that's displayed on-screen but that shouldn't affect the NMEA output. I ...


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tl;dr Does iOS know the phone's location solely from cell tower, i.e. without GPS data? Yes, iOS does, using Assisted GPS (Wikipedia, dmahr). How it works The article Deeper insights into Apple’s “GPS” explains how it works: All iPhones scan their environment for WiFi access points and cell towers and their signal strengths. If there is GPS reception ...


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You have a few of useful functions in the Google Maps JavaScript API V3 Reference under the google.maps.geometry.spherical namespace, namely computeDistanceBetween computeHeading computeOffset It's not quite possible to complete what you need with just those, but you could try using something from the JSTS library to fill the gap. For example, you could ...


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As mentioned by @mdsummer, there is a very good answer to a similar question here If you also need some tolerance on the time in your case, you can modify the distance calculation. Instead of a 2D euclidian distance, use a third dimension for the time. You then compute the distance in a new space that would help you identify "together runners". In order to ...


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Solution Using the analysis given at http://gis.stackexchange.com/a/20250 we may find the earth-centered Cartesian coordinates for a point at geodetic latitude f and longitude l are (x, y, z) = (a*cos(l)*cos(t), a*sin(l)*cos(t), b*sin(t)) where a is the semi-major axis (6 378 137 meters on the WGS 84 ellipsoid), b is the semi-minor axis (approximately 6 ...


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As an engineer having worked with GPS satellites, I can give you an explanation- it has to do with how many GPS satellites you are receiving signals from for your readings. There are 24 working satellites in the present Global Positional System and depending upon your location (inside a building, under trees, between tall buildings, etc. you will pick ...



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