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2

You know the location of point A and point B so you can use trigonometry to calculate the direction of travel. You know the times at point A and point B so you can calculate the speed of travel. Create a Euclidean Distance surface around point B such that each cell size represents one time unit of measure (one cell = one second of travel?). Create a ...


1

Are you able to use QGIS? If so, here is a workaround which may work for you; Load the .gpx file in QGIS (You should be able to drag-and-drop the file into Q). QGIS will ask you which features you want to load, highlight your chosen ones (eg. waypoints) and click 'OK'. Now on the Layers panel in QGIS right-click on the new layer and choose 'Save As...' ...


0

If the data logger stores the positions as tabulated file with Longitudes and Latitudes you can visualize that and, I think you can tell QGIS to watch the file for any alterations. So basically, yes


2

Both the base and rover need to be configured with SurvCE in order to properly define the settings of each (base coordinates, elevation mask, message type, etc.). Also, the radios must have settings configured so they are properly communicating (frequency, modulation type, etc.). Do note, that if you are in the US and these are not narrow band radios (12....


2

The normal to the ellipsoid is the vector orthogonal to the tangent to the ellipsoid at that point. This will not point to the center of the earth except at the equator and the poles. The gravity vector is orthogonal to the geiod and varies from the ellipsoidal normal by an amount called the deflection of the vertical. Which is usually expressed in the ...


1

If you can convert them to rinex format you can use the online Precise Point Positioning (PPP) service provided by the Canadian Geodetic Survey. You can find out more at http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geomatics/geodetic-reference-systems/tools-applications/10925#ppp, or google NRCAN and PPP It's a great service, but I'm not sure if it is intended ...


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Edit: Originally, this answer was just a link to another answer I posted to a Stack Overflow question. That has since been deleted by a moderator so I have copied and pasted it below. I am leaving this here because this was one of the top results I found when I searched for this problem and figured people may do the same in the future. I am writing a tool ...


1

Let's say you have two tables: gps and roads. In order to get the closest on-road point to the gps point and the distance with the original you have to: SELECT gps.id as pointid, St_ClosestPoint(roads.geom, gps.geom) as closest, St_Distance(gps.geom, St_ClosestPoint(roads.geom, gps.geom)) FROM gps, roads; However, I would be very careful/...


-1

I have used Garmin Basecamp for similar tasks, to create and load tracks into a GPS handheld.


1

You can try to get the location of your IP address with this python code: import requests import json send_url = 'http://freegeoip.net/json' r = requests.get(send_url) j = json.loads(r.text) lat = j['latitude'] lon = j['longitude'] map_pos = QgsPoint(lon, lat) rect = QgsRectangle(map_pos, map_pos) canvas = qgis.utils.iface.mapCanvas() canvas.setExtent(rect) ...


9

It appears to be decimals of a minute, as FelixIP suggested. So it could be written 68 35.067 N, 123 54.817 W and recognized in Google Earth. It's actually not too uncommon to see this notation. I plugged in a couple of points this way, and they appear on the river course.


0

The advantage of having multiple constellations is that the unit has a "view" of more satellites in the sky without having to use differential corrections. This helps with accuracy in general, in urban canyons, under canopies, and in poor weather. So, it depends on the field accuracy you need, and/or if you have access to post-processing capabilities. Here ...


0

There is a tool where you can export your active dataframe as a garmin custom map. Its a toolbox with a python script that exports what you are seeing on your active data frame to a .kmz that is also readable by your GPS (the garmin webpage tells that your GPS should be able to). The advantage of this toolbox (beside nothing necessary to install, free ...


0

Export it as tiff with world file and then use OkMap's MapTiling/Garmin Custom Maps utility to create a tiled kmz for uploading to your GPS. I believe OkMap is free, at least for this functionality, and they do ask for donations if you like it. The utility always asks if you want to overwrite the projection and do so, and then find their version of the ...


0

When you make the kmz the image tiles have to be in jpeg format. The easiest way to do it is to put your kmz on an SD card. Make a Garmin/CustomMaps directory and put the kmz in there. I tested this on a kmz I just made and used it on a 64S and it worked fine. Visible in BaseCamps also.


2

Without the data transfer utility there isn't a way (that I've ever heard of) to convert the device files to an SSF. Trimble data files on the device consist of 9 individual files ( .car; .dd; .gic; .gip; .gis; .giw; .gix; .obs, and .obx) that the transfer wizard takes and converts into a single SSF that you work with in Pathfinder Office. Without that ...



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