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0

Take a look at GPS Splitter from GPSGate. I use it to connect my Garmin via USB to a Windows 8 laptop and stream NMEA data. Your question doesn't provide specifics so I'm not sure what exactly you need / want.


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DOP relates the User Ranging Error (URE) to position coordinates error (PCE): PCE = URE * DOP It seems you already determined both PCE (2 m) and HDOP (1.2). The only unknown left is URE, which is this case equals URE = HPCE / HDOP = 1.67 m. Now with that information at hand, you can assume the URE will not change, then predict the PCE of interest ...


1

Although both applications are developed by Trimble, the online one is more up-to-date than the desktop one. More specifically, the desktop version uses the so-called almanacs to predict the satellite position (thus their viewing direction in the sky), so please make sure you have the latest ones installed. Secondly, please make sure the settings are the ...


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The tracking point function in the GPS information pane is meant to create nodes for connecting line segments in either a polyline, or polygon. When you are finished collecting the nodes you wish connected, you press the Add Line/Polygon button. When recording in a point layer, you will have to press the Add Point button for each location you wish to ...


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This isn't exactly what your looking for, but if your comfortable with python i've got a script that takes a gpx file and exif tags photos with location, including interpolating between points, and it could easily be modified to read the GPS data from a format other than gpx. https://gist.github.com/JesseCrocker/9c4b8e334ceba63f3d08


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It may not be your gps readings. The map base is unlikely to be as accurate as your readings. You are probably/possibly experiencing the difference between absolute position and relative/cartographic/ortho position. Unless the area you are surveying has been mapped to high accuracy putting your position on it may well appear innaccurate.


4

If the area is known and stationary, why not skip GPS altogether and use beacons? You can get accuracy up to a few inches using that approach. As of today, there are many software+hardware SDKs that are coming out that enable you to pinpoint location using fixed beacons and a local coordinate system (which then you can translate to a different coordinate ...


1

If you're using just a mobile phone, I don't think you would be able to get much more than that unless they support some form of differential correction or post processing. I haven't heard of that support in mobile phones yet. GPS units that collect that type of info (in my experience) are generally rather large and may weigh as much and be as big as ...


0

Take a look at the Garmin GLO. I found it's accurate to within < 10 feet, often < 6 feet, and provides NMEA data. I don't know about the logging functionality. I build my own processor / logger that connects to the GLO over bluetooth. For a no-code solution, you could connect a smart phone to the GLO and log using the phone and an app from your phone's ...


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It might be that false displaying applications don't respect <trkseg> correctly. If you add </trk><trk> to every trkseg change, it might come out correct. Otherwise you have to create a new GPX file for every <trkseg> using one trkseg per track and file.


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Positioning: only gives information about receiver coordinates.No information about enviorement Localization: gives information about receiver coordinates and also enviorement. positioning is a subtopic of localization additionaly GPS(Global Positioning system): is a positioning system (also a localization system) and gives coordinates of receiver ...


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Just rename the extension on your files to either .log or .nmea, quote: As of Google Earth release 5.2 (Free and pro versions) now supports NMEA import (.log and .nmea files). You can also try some sites online that perform the nmea2kml conversions. This www.gpsvisualizer.com site looks promising: Click on the link above Add your NMEA log ...


1

Assuming you are using the TerraSync software for capture, page 240 of this TerraSync Operation Guide pdf seems to outline the procedure you need to use. Digitizing Digitizing is the process of creating positions for a feature by selecting points on the map, instead of using GPS positions. A line or area feature can contain both GPS and ...


1

I'll assume your street line layer is already divided up into individual line segments. As I originally mentioned in a comment, those GPS tracks appear to be rather detailed and it might be worth Generalizing them as a first step. This should reduce processing times significantly, but you need to strike a balance between extraneous vertices and being able to ...


1

So after some research I decided to stick with the OSM metadata. I found the Overpass API, which is basically a query language, which I managed to understand reading this: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Overpass_API/Overpass_QL and testing it here http://overpass-api.de/query_form.html I ended up with this query: way ...


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You are using segments, so your road network must be divided into segments. If your network dataset is like many, it consists of many segments, with breakpoints where there are no intersections. You'll need to Dissolve your network, then Intersect it (with itself). That will create a points layer you can use to cut your networks into the segments you want. ...


1

Google maps roads API can do that, if a non-OSM solution is ok with you. See snapToRoad method which returns the GPS points snapped to the nearest Road. You can take the place id from the response and use Google Maps Places API to get corresponding Road name. https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/roads/snap


2

I think JasonT is on the right track (excuse the pun). Note, however, it is the concept of a buffer that you want, not to actually create a buffer. If you were using PostGIS (or similar software/libraries), you'd use ST_DWithin() to reject public road points that are too close to your GPS points.


2

The only thing external would do is get it a bit higher and away from any blockage of your body/ground elements when holding it. The antenna might be more sensitive/better design (re Michael's comment about reception), but since your primary obstruction is even farther overhead than that it's unlikely to make any difference. And the unit's signal processing ...


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I Made a tutorial for my blog to help out with this. This uses the Garmin BaseCamp Software which is free to use. I cover how to join tracks, edit unwanted data out of tracks and how to reduce file size by filtering out unnecessary points. I hope this helps! http://outdooroutlier.blogspot.com/2015/05/how-to-edit-gpx-data-to-make-useable.html


1

I'm not aware of any empirical studies, but my view is that smartphones are a better option than handheld GPS devices. Many smartphones these days support both GPS and GLONASS, and they support modern data capture applications, such as Fulcrum. Couple a smartphone with a bluetooth GNSS device, from Trimble or others, and you have a pretty damn good ...


1

Unless there is a WAAS capable or not distinction (or similar error correction), consumer units aren't likely to vary enough, or rather be accurate enough, even with new tech to warrant an upgrade. That said, newer chipsets can potentially achieve locks faster, have better signal processing, or have better antenna designs. The units themselves may also ...


1

I posted a python script to use from ArcGIS here: Exporting 3GB ArcGIS Raster to KML without losing resolution? KML is uncompressed KMZ. The output here will work in either application. Georeferencing the scans could be done any number of ways; write a world file manually, use software. You can do it in Google Earth. But I feel the interface is very clunky ...



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