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You can do this and more prior to importing into QGIS with a tool called GPS Track Editor (www.gpstrackeditor.com) It allows you to merge (from simultaneously running gps units), restructure, increase frequency (densify), reverse and filter for local inconsitances. A great free utility.


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I'm working with our local cycling group to anonymise GPX files on two criteria (primarily for security). I've never come across a standard way of anonymising data but this satisfies two concerns of our members, while preserving accuracy along roads and speed information: Personal locations, removing 'private' areas for individuals; Obscuring timestamps so ...


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make an adjustment to the X and Y coordinate of each point by a random distance between a certain minimum and maximum offset. also make the direction of the offset (plus or minus) a random selection. Include in the randomisation that some points may have no adjustment to one or both parts of a coordinate pair.


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Adze application for MacOS is the best tool I've found for copying out track segments from a GPX file. You have a range select tool built in which you click and drag along the track and it selects all points between visually. It's easy to hold shift and select additional points and then easily copy as a separate track. You can also use the delete and ...


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GPSUtility is still the best tool that I've found for editing and working with GPS data: breaking and joining track segments, exporting/importing formats, filtering by location and time. The interface is a bit frustrating but the features are varied and do everything you request. It's not free but the trial lets you work with everything except very large ...


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Use the ogr2ogr command line tool, that is distributed with QGIS. In Windows, open the OSGeo4W Shell from the QGIS program group and enter for %p in (path_to_gpx_files\*ride*.gpx) do ogr2ogr path_for_output\gpx.shp -append %p track_points -fieldTypeToString DateTime The equivalent command in a Unix bash shell would be for i in $( ls ...


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Import your GPX into ArcMap using the GPX to Features tool (found in Conversion Tools toolbox). Convert the resulting point dataset into a line dataset using the Points to Line tool (Data Management Tools > Features toolbox). Set the sort field to the DateTime field for this process. Commence editing the resulting line feature, and using the Split Tool ...


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You can import multiple GPX files at a time, although you will be prompted each and every file for the data layer you want. With over 400 traces that's not going to be fun. You might want to look at ogr2ogr. This is the Swiss-Army-Knife of geo file conversions, it will convert almost any geoformat into any other compatible (vector/raster) geoformat. an ...


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Here is a simple procedure with ArcGIS Desktop: use "GPX To Features" tool to convert your gpx to a point feature class in a file geodatabase Once your new point feature class is added to the map, then use the select tool to select your start and end points (you can use the SHIFT button with the select to to add to the selection open the attribute table ...


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I recommend you to use QGIS as it is Open Source. Open the GPS track, I guess you its save as a GXP file, by Add Vector Layer or Crtl+Shift+V. Select which vector layer you want add. Chose tracks and hit okay Right click on the new Layer and Save as.... Chose ESRI Shapefile. The new loaded Shape-File you can now select and edit it by ...


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Having previously answered this question (with the suggestion to use JOSM and a text editor) I think I now found a better answer. Viking GPS editor seems to do a good job. I'm new to it and I'm testing it but so far I'm really pleased. It works quite like GIS software with its ideas of layers and a basemap - but what's particularly pleasing is that it ...


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I would recommend uploading it to runkeeper. It imports the route and you can simply enter the duration time yourself. Then runkeeper wil evenly distribute the time among all the waypoints and you will get a flat speed during the complete route. From there, you could export to a gpx file again (I have done this some times now, when I had a route and just a ...


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Thanks Mapperz! I converted the GPX file in QGIS to a shapefile and imported that in arcmap, looks great now. Suppose the Arcmap in-program GPX to Shape converter doesn't work flawless still..


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Looks okay in QGIS 2.10 pisa There is a lack of attributes only track_id seems to be populated


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You could batch convert them with gdal to shp, either in python or on the command line and then open the result.



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