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10

There is possibility to do it in Print Composer now. Also it is possible to simply manually create vector layer with grid in QGIS (Vector->Research Tools->Vector Grid) - the only way if more grids are needed in one frame (update: from QGIS 2.6 it is possible to do more grids for frames). In Composer Manager select map frame and go to Item Properties / Grid ...


7

The 'National Grid Shape file' can be downloaded at: https://github.com/charlesroper/OSGB_Grids Using this for a OS grid at a specific resolution would take some aggregation based on the TILE field, or by using the SCALE field.


6

In the Data Frames Properties dialog, select Grids, then select your graticule and click Properties. The last tab (Intervals) in Properties allows you to modify the interval for your parallels and meridians, as well as their origin. In your example your merdians are every 4°, probably the same for the parallels. The default origin is -90, which with 4° ...


5

Not built in , AFAIK. The way I do this is by creating a polygon shape file "grid" and then reprojecting it. So you could: enable On-the-fly reprojection Set the CRS to Lat/Lon Use the Vector->Research Tools->Vector Grid to create a polygon grid at whatever interval is appropriate Display the polygons with no fill, to show only the grid lines. Return to ...


5

As user30184 pointed out, there's a tool that does the trick. Run the tool Create Fishnet Simply put your old 1km grid in the Template extent. This will populate the coordinates of your extent. Then fill the "Cell Size Width" and "Cell Size Height" with 500 geometry type > polygon That's it


4

Who's your target audience? I agree that graticules (or - as an ex-surveyor - reticule) is the word that first came to mind, but if you're aiming this at a less-experienced user base, then I would stick to something more descriptive like your suggestion of Coordinate Grid and Distance Grid.


4

After calculating areas of the 1km grid shapefile rectangles, I can confirm that the single cells are not precisely 1km². The error is small, though. If your errors are larger, it is possible that your problem is related to a different issue (possible reprojection errors). Small errors in the source dataset Most of the calculated areas are less than 10m² ...


4

Burning polygons into a raster is by far the most efficient way to classify a graticule as containing land (or not). The ALL_TOUCHED=TRUE rasterizing option ensures that a graticule location is "contained" if even a small part of a polygon touches it. The processing should take a few minutes to do. from osgeo import ogr, gdal # Shapefile, PG: connection, ...


3

Let's stick with the UK ellipsoid + datum (to avoid datum transformation issues). You will inevitably have the "problem" is that the Ordnance Survey grids are defined on the OS projection which is a transverse Mercator projection with central longitude 2°W and central scale 0.9996012717. The scale variation over Britain is roughly 0.9996 to 1.0002 ...


3

Read about Data Driven Pages. Between a strip map or an indexed map with a fishnet grid you will have a map series that will be exactly what you're looking for.


3

Create a fishnet http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//00170000002q000000 If you want to actually split the data, you need to do some sort of intersect.


3

ArcGIS has different methods for creating grids and graticules. In the Data Frame properties, there is a Grids and Graticules Wizard. From the 10.1 help: They don't appear in data view. If you are interested in creating grid or graticule features that draw in data view, you might want to look into using grid and graticule layers. The grid and ...


3

To implement the alternative solution you can try this tutorial on Two Different Graticules with QGIS to implement a different CRS graticule.


3

For the first type, coordinate grid would be a good choice. For the second type I would choose either: graticule stadia lines hair lines calibration lines Although these words don't come from the cartographic world per se, you don't tend to find them on paper maps; so there's been no need for a cartographic name for them. You might find a graticule ...


3

I can't see a way to set a default for new grids. A workaround is to create the desired grid style including decimal places, then use the > Style > Save option: Open a new ArcMap document and create a new grid (quickly tabbing through all the panels of the wizard, accepting the defaults). Then use > Style and choose the saved style.


3

you could use the create fishnet tool to make your grid as a shapefile. Just make sure that you work in a Plate carree projection (Or in Lat/Long) so that vertical lines are meridians and horizontal lines are parallel (this is just an example as there are other projections where this is the case). With fishnet you can select the cell size (Width and Height) ...


3

So you realize you're trying to identify roughly 23 of 64 billion tiles? Assuming that each query takes 10 milliseconds (which is still too low), you're looking at 20+ CPU years. Since large swaths of the Earth are all land or all water, you can cut the corner on these, but assuming this reduces the problem to only 1/10th of 64,800 one-degree grids, you've ...


3

I'm not sure what it is you're asking. If you want the coordinates of the vertices, you'll have to create a point layer from your vertices. However, to me, it looks like you wan the grid/graticule coordinates to be displayed on your polygon, instead of the edge of the dataframe. If you want the graticule labels to display like in your image, Go to your ...


3

180 degrees of latitude = 7200 0.025° sections from pole to pole 360 degrees of longitude = 14400 0.025° sections along the equator 7200 * 14400 = 1.0368 * 10^8 0.025°x0.025° squares (not actually squares)


3

Take a look at the raster function in the raster package. It will let you create a raster with a specified extent, number of rows/columns and resolution. Here I will use characteristics of your data summary to create a 100x100 raster within the specified extent. I am passing an extent object to define the x and y limits. You can also use the specific ...


3

This is a reasonably simple problem to solve in ArcGIS. Open the Shapefile (it's not a "raster shapefile" btw; there's no such thin). Add two fields to your shapefile. One for Lat, one for Lon. Both should be of type Float or double. Populate one of these fields with the X, and one with the Y value for the point. (Using "calculate geometry"). Now, create ...


2

One alternative may be to populate the attributes yourself? Provided that your generated grids are polygons rather than lines, you could use Easting and Northing figures to populate a field for each object. There will obviously be some conversion of the numeric grid references to the OS Grid Ref, however there are plenty of example scripts out there to ...


2

You can also do this in SAGA GIS, A full explanation can be found here: http://marinedataliteracy.org/margis/grats_frames.htm


2

If you only need a grid for your print layout. That's possible in Print Composer. Check the map item's properties for grid settings If you want an actual grid layer in your QGIS project, you can create one from Vector menu.


2

This is not much of an answer but it would not fit in the comment window; You can do this with ArcObjects. I made a tool into which I enter parameters (extent, x and Y spacing) and it will create the grid in a existing polyline feature class. It's not too coplex to do this with ArcObjects but do create something like this does require a solid understanding ...


2

For reference, this setting is found under the map item properties panel, "show grid" -> "draw coordinates" -> "format":


2

You will be able to do that in a future version, as it has just been implemented: commit d0b4fc17ea5d8a4a8006e2bc2bc6bd222a505f1d Author: Marco Hugentobler <sourcepole.ch> Date: Thu Aug 9 17:23:35 2012 +0200 [FEATURE]: possibility to show composer map grid coordinates in degree/minute/seconds I doubt there is any c++ plugin out there already ...


2

Grids that you generate in the data frame properties only show up in layout view. If you need a grid that you can see in data view you will need to build one that exists as a shapefile or feature class. If you are in layout view and still can't see it go back to the properties dialogue for the grid and make sure your spacing is visible at the current scale ...


2

It looks like you are maybe misunderstanding what ArcGIS is telling you here. Your coordinate system is not in decimal degrees, it's in meters. The "Central Meridian", "Standard Parallel 1", and other values you are seeing in the Data Source box are simply describing the coordinate system your data is using, they do not represent the actual coordinates of ...


2

The problem you have to solve is that a vector grid is displayed in a scale-independent pixel size, while a raster image is defined by a fixed cell size. You could rasterize your vector grid, and merge it with the satellite image, but zooming out the grid will get smaller until it can not be seen anymore. The other way round, a 10km, 1-pixel-wide grid will ...



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