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9

There is possibility to do it in Print Composer now. Also it is possible to simply manually create vector layer with grid in QGIS (Vector->Research Tools->Vector Grid) - the only way if more grids are needed in one frame (update: from QGIS 2.6 it is possible to do more grids for frames). In Composer Manager select map frame and go to Item Properties / Grid ...


6

In the Data Frames Properties dialog, select Grids, then select your graticule and click Properties. The last tab (Intervals) in Properties allows you to modify the interval for your parallels and meridians, as well as their origin. In your example your merdians are every 4°, probably the same for the parallels. The default origin is -90, which with 4° ...


5

Not built in , AFAIK. The way I do this is by creating a polygon shape file "grid" and then reprojecting it. So you could: enable On-the-fly reprojection Set the CRS to Lat/Lon Use the Vector->Research Tools->Vector Grid to create a polygon grid at whatever interval is appropriate Display the polygons with no fill, to show only the grid lines. Return to ...


4

Who's your target audience? I agree that graticules (or - as an ex-surveyor - reticule) is the word that first came to mind, but if you're aiming this at a less-experienced user base, then I would stick to something more descriptive like your suggestion of Coordinate Grid and Distance Grid.


4

Burning polygons into a raster is by far the most efficient way to classify a graticule as containing land (or not). The ALL_TOUCHED=TRUE rasterizing option ensures that a graticule location is "contained" if even a small part of a polygon touches it. The processing should take a few minutes to do. from osgeo import ogr, gdal # Shapefile, PG: connection, ...


4

As user30184 pointed out, there's a tool that does the trick. Run the tool Create Fishnet Simply put your old 1km grid in the Template extent. This will populate the coordinates of your extent. Then fill the "Cell Size Width" and "Cell Size Height" with 500 geometry type > polygon That's it


3

So you realize you're trying to identify roughly 23 of 64 billion tiles? Assuming that each query takes 10 milliseconds (which is still too low), you're looking at 20+ CPU years. Since large swaths of the Earth are all land or all water, you can cut the corner on these, but assuming this reduces the problem to only 1/10th of 64,800 one-degree grids, you've ...


3

you could use the create fishnet tool to make your grid as a shapefile. Just make sure that you work in a Plate carree projection (Or in Lat/Long) so that vertical lines are meridians and horizontal lines are parallel (this is just an example as there are other projections where this is the case). With fishnet you can select the cell size (Width and Height) ...


3

I can't see a way to set a default for new grids. A workaround is to create the desired grid style including decimal places, then use the > Style > Save option: Open a new ArcMap document and create a new grid (quickly tabbing through all the panels of the wizard, accepting the defaults). Then use > Style and choose the saved style.


3

For the first type, coordinate grid would be a good choice. For the second type I would choose either: graticule stadia lines hair lines calibration lines Although these words don't come from the cartographic world per se, you don't tend to find them on paper maps; so there's been no need for a cartographic name for them. You might find a graticule ...


3

ArcGIS has different methods for creating grids and graticules. In the Data Frame properties, there is a Grids and Graticules Wizard. From the 10.1 help: They don't appear in data view. If you are interested in creating grid or graticule features that draw in data view, you might want to look into using grid and graticule layers. The grid and ...


3

To implement the alternative solution you can try this tutorial on Two Different Graticules with QGIS to implement a different CRS graticule.


3

I'm not sure what it is you're asking. If you want the coordinates of the vertices, you'll have to create a point layer from your vertices. However, to me, it looks like you wan the grid/graticule coordinates to be displayed on your polygon, instead of the edge of the dataframe. If you want the graticule labels to display like in your image, Go to your ...


2

If you only need a grid for your print layout. That's possible in Print Composer. Check the map item's properties for grid settings If you want an actual grid layer in your QGIS project, you can create one from Vector menu.


2

For reference, this setting is found under the map item properties panel, "show grid" -> "draw coordinates" -> "format":


2

You will be able to do that in a future version, as it has just been implemented: commit d0b4fc17ea5d8a4a8006e2bc2bc6bd222a505f1d Author: Marco Hugentobler <sourcepole.ch> Date: Thu Aug 9 17:23:35 2012 +0200 [FEATURE]: possibility to show composer map grid coordinates in degree/minute/seconds I doubt there is any c++ plugin out there already ...


2

This is not much of an answer but it would not fit in the comment window; You can do this with ArcObjects. I made a tool into which I enter parameters (extent, x and Y spacing) and it will create the grid in a existing polyline feature class. It's not too coplex to do this with ArcObjects but do create something like this does require a solid understanding ...


2

Grids that you generate in the data frame properties only show up in layout view. If you need a grid that you can see in data view you will need to build one that exists as a shapefile or feature class. If you are in layout view and still can't see it go back to the properties dialogue for the grid and make sure your spacing is visible at the current scale ...


2

It looks like you are maybe misunderstanding what ArcGIS is telling you here. Your coordinate system is not in decimal degrees, it's in meters. The "Central Meridian", "Standard Parallel 1", and other values you are seeing in the Data Source box are simply describing the coordinate system your data is using, they do not represent the actual coordinates of ...


2

The problem you have to solve is that a vector grid is displayed in a scale-independent pixel size, while a raster image is defined by a fixed cell size. You could rasterize your vector grid, and merge it with the satellite image, but zooming out the grid will get smaller until it can not be seen anymore. The other way round, a 10km, 1-pixel-wide grid will ...


2

If you are using version 2.6 you can use a grid in a different CRS from the layers and project. You can even have more than one grid. The only thing for if you want a graticule is to set the X and Y spacing in decimal format. As you can see in the image I set the X and Y spacing to show lines every 15 minutes. Also you can see in the image that you can ...


2

I finally managed to fix it on my own, thx anyway ;) The trick is to leave interval units as is: Maps units.


2

EPSG 3857 is Pseudo Mercator and the coordinates are in meters. You need to change the grid CRS to EPSG 4326 as shown here:


2

The closest I can come is to create a measured grid in ArcMap. General steps: Open data frame properties Select the Grids tab Start the Grids & Graticules wizard and follow the steps. Once the grid is created, you can make changes to the style of the grid with the Style button on the Grids tab. Scroll down to the bottom of the list--any of the MGRS or ...


2

It sounds like you have already created the report that you want to place on your layout. The ArcGIS 10.2 Online Help has a page entitled Creating a report which says: From the Report Viewer, you can click the Add Report To Layout button to place the report on the map layout


2

For the ticking mentioned by Chris W, you can use the Station Lines Plugin: Note that the Station lines layers are memory layers. You have to save them to disk into another format to use them again.


2

If you want to take a Python script approach, try out this customer grid tool, http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=4e2a8fe3f297405d81747df1d1fdb45d. It should create quarters of whatever grid size you have.


1

This was a bug in the development version of QGIS which coincidentally was fixed yesterday! See https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/commit/3af6dbc4e1fc49b4b755a542e9583573365a4bd2 . Download the next daily snapshot and you should be right.


1

An alternative to @Dan's method of exporting from the data frame properties is to use the Project tool in ArcToolbox. To reproject your shapefile, access ArcCatalog, select Data Management Tools - Projections & Transformations - Feature - Project. Select WGS 1984 as your output coordinate system and specify a new file name. This projected shapefile ...


1

I can tell you the answer for the second question: How to show UTM-coordinates in the lower right corner. In leaflet the internal coordinate system is always longitude/latitude as far as I know, and you have to transform every time you need to work with your data. First make sure you have installed proj4.js and proj4leaflet.js. To show your coordinates you ...



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