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You may use the Minimum Bounding Geometry tool/method to get feature orientation, which may then be joined back with the polyline layer(s). After that you could use either Field Calculator or Calculate Field method to write a custom python or vbs function for generating the comparison result, see function examples from the link below. Using the Calculate ...


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I thought I'd answer this myself just in case anyone else with a similar problem ever stumbles on this. Using the above advice on converting my Cartesian coordinates to polar coordinates, I've made a function which calculates a minimum enclosing circle around the x,y coordinates, and divides this circle into a user-defined number of 'grid' cells with equal ...


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As you mention ArcGIS: You could create a fishnet (Note: the link is for ArcGIS 10.0) for your surface und use the resulting polygons to calculate the number of points inside them. Make sure to choose the right projection, as Andre Joost already pointed out. It sounds like you would need to choose an equal area projection.


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The problem you have to solve is that a vector grid is displayed in a scale-independent pixel size, while a raster image is defined by a fixed cell size. You could rasterize your vector grid, and merge it with the satellite image, but zooming out the grid will get smaller until it can not be seen anymore. The other way round, a 10km, 1-pixel-wide grid will ...


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To me, the simplest approach is to probably convert your XY datapoints to the polar coordinate system that defines your circular 'arena'. Be sure to convert your XY coordinates such that the center of your circle is the origin of your Cartesian grid before converting to polar coordinates. Almost all math texts would provide these straightforward conversion ...



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