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10

Don't forget OpenStreetMap. There are many map viewers that can display the OSM data. I.e. JMapViewer, MapPanel and JXMapViewer for Java applications. At least the last one can also display Google Maps in your application.


10

I would recommend looking into TileMill which is made by the same people that were workign on Maps On A Stick. TileMill was either part of Maps On A Stick, or is what Maps On A Stick became - something like that. I forget the connection. Anyway... TileMill will let you load geographic data, style it how you like and then create a set of PNG map tiles for a ...


8

I would agree with Moyles that the samples are just samples and dojo boileplate is a great resource however at current snovers boilerplate isn't a viable solution. You have two different versions of dojo going on there. The current js api still uses the classic require syntax of dojo 1.6.1 and does not support AMD. I'm sure that a newer js api will be built ...


8

You might be interested in the projects Maps on a Stick and MapBox iPad. (disclaimer: designed the former, involved in the latter. however, both are BSD-licensed, and the underlying tile format, termed ".mbtiles", is SQL-based.) Maps on a Stick is an offline OpenLayers map. The main reasoning for going with a portable database/server instead of client side ...


8

Actually, you don't need OpenLayers - or any other library - for the small maps (like the ones on the top of your example). They are purely static (no panning/zooming/etc) and thus can be simple images displaying the response of a mapserver of your choice.


7

OpenLayers can be used for many static maps; I have in the past created up to 200 maps on a single page without a huge performance penalty, so long as they are simple maps. Many sites have used small, static OpenLayers maps to create simple maps, because then they can use the same set of image tiles that they use for many other maps on their sites. When ...


7

ESRI (of course): http://www.esri.com/software/mapping_for_everyone/api/index.html (Here's a blog post about the ESRI choices for the web: http://blogs.esri.com/Dev/blogs/arcgisserver/archive/2009/10/19/Which-ESRI-Web-mapping-API-should-I-choose_3F00_.aspx)


5

(1) and (2) are possible with eVis plugin (Documentation). Ad (3): You should be able to use Field Calculator to add the path to the filenames you already in attribute table. Field calculator is described here: http://www.qgis.org/wiki/Calculating_field_values. You can use + operator to concatenate strings.


5

Your MAP file seems to indicate that your LAYER is coming from another WFS server using CONNECTIONTYPE WFS - are you sure you mean to do this? If you just want to enable WFS for a layer using data on your server then just define a standard LAYER. LAYER NAME 'MLSOA' TYPE POLYGON DATA "C:/path/shapefile.shp" CLASS STYLE COLOR ...


5

Stick to a single where parameter in your query string. Here's an example of a where clause hitting multiple fields: ...


5

SimpleGeo (http://simplegeo.com) UMapper (http://www.umapper.com) CloudMade (http://www.cloudmade.com/)


5

This only a partial answer and lacks all python but too long to fit into a comment field. Your data is rather easy to convert into WKT: capture the coordinate part switch commas to spaces and spaces to commas close inside WKT polygon: POLYGON ((...)) POLYGON ((39.655756 -4.034769,39.655757 -4.034769,39.655758 -4.034769,39.655800 -4.034788,39.655885 ...


4

HTML can be used to create simple static maps without any server side stuff like a WMS or client-side libraries like OpenLayers. Use a raster image of the map area in combination with the HMTL's tags map and area, the last one with the attribute shape set to 'poly'. You would have to give border's map coords relative to the top, left corner of the map ...


4

you can get the coordinates of your shape as below code: vectorLayer.features[i].geometry.getBounds(); and also you can get covered area, centroid of your shape, vertices of ypur shape, length or geodesic area. if you want specific feature bounds, you can write order of your feature [i] place like this: vectorLayer.features[3].geometry.getBounds(); ...


4

That's the markup generated by dojo for a specific kind of widget (dijit). You wouldn't actually build that yourself– it's the result of creating a dijit (either declaratively or programmatically). There are a number of button-style dijits available: http://dojotoolkit.org/reference-guide/dijit/form/Button.html ...


4

take a look at: http://s3.amazonaws.com/shapefile-js/simple.html and http://badassjs.com/post/845509816/rendering-binary-shapefiles-with-javascript both use javscript for rendering the shapefile


4

Drag Marker and Geocoder with Coordinates https://gmaps-samples-v3.googlecode.com/svn-history/r49/trunk/draggable-markers/draggable-markers.html Entire code: <html> <head> <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1.0, user-scalable=no" /> <script type="text/javascript" ...


3

This line var area = event.geometry.getArea(); should be var area = event.feature.geometry.getArea(); So i believe this is what you're looking for: vectors.events.on({ featuremodified: featureModified }); function featureModified(event) { var area = event.feature.geometry.getArea(); var radius = 0.565352 * Math.sqrt(area); ...


3

Unfortunately, it won't import your ArcGIS project files, but QGIS has the HTML Image Plugin that may do what you want. Perhaps if you set up a QGIS project once, and just refreshed the data behind it, it would work for you? It may not meet all of your criteria, but I'm not sure anything will.


3

It should be pretty obvious that samples aren't meant to be serious applications: they're samples. That said, it's much less common, in the typical internet world, to use something like Backbone than to use dojo, which is known for being expansive and complex, but often unnecessary. If you could describe your objective more, it'd be easier to make a solid ...


3

Think you will need to create your own tilecache on 'localhost' see http://code.google.com/p/cumberland/wiki/TilePyramiderAndOpenLayers Examples Using vmap http://localhost:8081/vmap0/levelzero/0/0.png The tile near the middle of the tile set in the third zoom level of vmap0. http://localhost:8081/vmap0/leveltwo/3/4.png The tile near ...


3

Possible with the ESRI JavaScript API Note you will need to know the map id in this example it is '5b9675ca7ca9426a99ced88f66b42331' var mapDeferred = esri.arcgis.utils.createMap("5b9675ca7ca9426a99ced88f66b42331", "map" <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd"> ...


3

you must be having map div.put following code <div id="map"> <input id="Addlyr" type="submit" value = "Add Layer" style="position: absolute; z-index: 1000; left: 100px; float: right;" /> </div> if you want new button and put nice style adjust using css in style attribute of input button. If you are referring + and - button then ...


3

I think you can solve this problem, if you adapt your situation, like in the example bellow. Presuming this is how it looks the vector layer's attribute table: Here's the images' storing folder: And this is the annotation.html : <b> [% "name" %] </b> <br /> <img src=file:///c:/temp/images/[% "img_src" %].png /> Eventually, ...


2

nearmap.com - photo map resolution kicks ass and they have this Timeline concept where you can see how things change over time.


2

Maybe another approach: Geopublisher http://en.geopublishing.org can publish your maps for offline use. Geopublisher is a Desktop software that allows you to plug together vector and raster data and create digital maps. Then you can export this map as a stand-alone Java application. It even creates autostart files etc. and does not require a Java ...


2

One complexity that seems to show up in articles about this is that: Note that the MIME type of the manifest file is text/cache-manifest. And the examples all seem to list specific files to cache (but I may need to read further).


2

<button onClick=_onButtonClick>?</button> Most of that code is to make the button 'pretty'. You'll need to use the Dojo dijits stuff to put the map on the page, but you could fall back to plain old HTML a lot of the time.


2

I haven't used this ArcScript before, so I'm not sure which of your criteria it does or does not meet, but it sounds like a good starting place. And, of course, being a script you should be able to customize it to your heart's content. Edit: Here's another potential candidate.


2

You are getting the validation error because esri is using declarative dojo syntax which is not valid w3c html. After the dojo.parser updates the html it should be valid markup. In your example they are actually mixing the html5 acceptable way and the old way. label is not allowed on a button. I'd imagine dojo slips that <button>label</button> ...



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