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5

You can capture the entire tcp stream using e.g. tcpdump -i interface_name port 8080 -w /tmp/capture after the capture is complete you copy the file from the server to some station and use wireshark to decode the capture.


5

After much grepping through the OpenLayers source, I have found it! The problem was not a missing request header, but a missing attribute on the img elements that make up the layer, specifically crossorigin. See MDN for the details of that attribute, and the documentation for OpenStreetMap layers for how to use it with OpenLayers (Update: Here is a little ...


4

The JSON response from the server should contain an error object (in JSON) that you might be able to use to tell your cache server to dismiss. I wasn't able to match your "Invalid URL" using ESRI's online servers, but got a similar light-pink error with the following URL: ...


3

You can install and configure the logback tee filter as documented here: http://logback.qos.ch/access.html#teeFilter The Tee filter seems to dump both request and response headers. another solution builtin in geoserver, does not meet user requirements Edit the web.xml file in webapps/geoserver/WEB-INF/web.xml then scroll down until you reach the ...


2

Your code to set the cookie is valid but the browser will only pass the cookie to sites in your own domain. You may also want to set an expires date (otherwise gone when browser closes) and set the path to the root of your domain (otherwise only goes to your page). document.cookie = "referrer=" + window.location.origin + '; expires=' + ...


1

This is not the accepted way to solve this problem. As answered in another question of yours the correct method is to create a proxy script or similar functionality in your web application. For some of the Geoserver responses it may be possible to configure it around this by ensuring the responses are in GeoJSON format ect but you would severely limit the ...


1

The port is considered part of the site so http://localhost:3890 and http://localhost:8080 are not the same. From the first paragraph here In computing, the same-origin policy is an important security concept for a number of browser-side programming languages, such as JavaScript. The policy permits scripts running on pages originating from the same site ...



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