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5

I believe the "max" keyword in raster calculator was deprecated with the transition from ArcGIS 9.x to ArcGIS 10. So Rasto's answer probably won't work in ArcGIS 10 (it didn't for me when I just tried it). If you have only two rasters, you can still make a condition statement to find the maximum using the "Con" keyword in map algebra. The syntax is ...


4

You can use the tiff file in ArcMap. You would then use the Slope Tool from 3D Analyst or from Spatial analyst. If you have a high resolution Lidar DHM, i.e. with a resolution finer then 1m, you should consider to downscale the resolution. Especially if you only have handheld GPS coordinates for your soil plots. If you have DGPS, the high resolution LIDAR ...


3

As you suggest, creating a point layer and sampling at each point would work. Here's how you can do it in QGIS Create a point layer representing each pixel of the raster. You can do this via Vector -> Research Tools -> Regular Points. Use number of points as x_size * y_size. So for a raster of 100 px width x 100px height, use 10000. Specify an offset of ...


3

The Raster to Point tool in ArcGIS will create a point at the centre of each cell. Then you can use Sample. You could change the resolution of your raster and create points for that with RESOLUTION/2 and combine the points. But I don't see the need. Any point created with resolution/2 will fall within the original pixel. Or on the edge of two pixels.


3

In Idrisi (Kilimanjaro, Andes, Taiga or Selva versions) look for function "Idrisi file convertion 16/32" in FILE menu. This convert your old vector file format (.vec) to new version format (.vct). Then in idrisi export to SHAPEFILE. or open your new idrisi vector file in ARCGIS, then convert to CAD. Method 2 Other method (i am not sure for all), but try ...


2

with ArcGIS, you can use the "copy raster" tools to convert the img file in a ENVI file. Just write ".dat" at the end of the name of the output file. With ENVI you just need to convert to an ENVI file and use the file that has no extension. By the way, you don't need to write code to use gdal. You can install it with OSGEO4W, then you type gdal_translate ...


2

SuperMap can convert Idrisi .vec to shapefiles. Look at the the table called "Table 3 Supported Dataset Types When Exporting Them into Outside Vector Data Formats." SuperMap Deskpro Professional and All-in-one Desktop GIS is required. A 60 Day Trial license is available.


2

I Just completed somthing similar, exept i used the Minimum parameter (on 700 rasters). If you are looking to execute the tool on more than two rasters use the list data method and then use it as the variable in the tool. Good Luck!


2

I'm not sure precisely what you're trying to do, but I suspect you could accomplish it in Arc without leaving the raster, with some combination of: Map algebra / raster calculator (which you can use for pixels directly overlapping each other) The Neighborhood statistics toolset (which you can use to sample pixels in the vicinity of a given pixels) with a ...


1

I just wanted to close the question as suggested by DPierce, since I found a solution: just opened the .K file made in Idrisi with a editor (I used notepad++) and saved all the points coordinates in .csv format. I still do not have any specific info on the .K file format, nut it is irrilevant at this point.


1

If it is a single band raster, you can use gdal_translate: kyle@kyle-workstation:Desktop$ gdal_translate -b 1 -of XYZ -co ADD_HEADER_LINE=YES kyle.png test.xyz Input file size is 992, 744 0...10...20...30...40...50...60...70...80...90...100 - done. kyle@kyle-workstation:Desktop$ head test.xyz X Y Z 0.5 0.5 208 1.5 0.5 211 2.5 0.5 210 3.5 0.5 211 4.5 0.5 ...



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