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8

use gdalwarp as following code: gdalwarp -srcnodata 0 -dstalpha input.tif output.tif -srcnodata value [value...]: Set nodata masking values for input bands (different values can be supplied for each band). If more than one value is supplied all values should be quoted to keep them together as a single operating system argument. Masked values ...


6

You can download the scene boundaries here; http://landsat.usgs.gov/tools_wrs-2_shapefile.php You could use these as they are or generate an "inside" buffer shapefile to ensure that you trim all bad data in all bands. Create a separate file for each scene (use split by attributes tool if there are many images to be processed). Then clip the rasters (CLIP ...


6

Removing the black collar is very easy using ArcMap 10: Select the "blue identify tab". Then select the black background to determine the pixel value (in my case the black background pixel value is set to 0). Right click on your raster layer in the table of contents, select Properties > Symbology. Choose the color display you want. Check the "Display ...


4

I ran into the same issue today, the following worked for me: Create raster mosaic dataset. Make sure to specify your pixel type. In my case, I specified 16 bit unsigned. In the "Add Raster to mosaic dataset" window check the "update overviews" box. Under "Advanced Options" Also from the advanced options, import your coordinate system. Make sure to select ...


4

Calulate statistics on the raster. You need the statistics to be able to apply stretches etc when displaying your new mosaic. The values you see are just the default max and min values possible for the pixel depth of your raster and not the actual range of the data within it. You will get the proper range once you compute statistcs.


4

If you don't mind getting your hands dirty with some Python, you could write a script that uses the GDAL Python bindings to do most of the heavy lifting. The broad steps I'd use are: Load the master raster and extract its colour table as a simple Python list. Load the source raster, and for each entry in its colour table search for a corresponding colour ...


3

The raster analog to WFS is WCS, the Web Coverage Service. The analog to GetFeature would be GetCoverage. The principles of WFS and WCS are the same (serving of raw spatial data), but the implementations are slightly different, as one deals with vectors and one deal with rasters. GeoServer has some documentation on WCS here: ...


3

The manual way to do this is to use the official WRS-2 path/row scene boundaries Download the WRS-2 shape file from USGS’ Path/Row Shapefiles dedicated web-page Select the path/row tile of your interest and use it as a mask to clip border fringes (this might involve rasterising the vector tile) To answer, however, your question directly about an ...


3

You need to understand the difference between an image mosaic and an image pyramid. A mosaic is for stitching together a number of images of the same resolution. A pyramid is a series of increasing resolution tile sets that speed up the display of large images.


3

By default MapProxy uses a TileCache compatible directory layout (zz/xxx/xxx/xxx/yyy/yyy/yyy.format), but you can use directory_layout for switch to TMS compatible directories (zz/xxxx/yyyy.format). I've wrote little python script for stitching tiles from TileCache compatible directories into one big image. PIL library should be installed: import os import ...


2

Thanks for all the help. Here's what I did. Convert both images to points making sure that the output pixels contain the same information as the input raster. Merge both point shapefiles into a single output. Interpolate the points. Clip to desired geometry. Hope this helps. Thank you all especially to Aragon and Raynor.


2

Using ArcCatalog, copy one of the rasters to a folder somewhere. This will be the output raster. Rename the output raster. Then use the mosaic tool to mosaic the second raster to the existing output raster.


2

changing the both raster value range you can check out: Reclassify (Spatial Analyst), here Reclassifies (or changes) the values in a raster. Synchronize Mosaic Dataset (Data Management), here Rebuilds the raster item and updates affected fields in the mosaic dataset using the raster type and options that were used when it was originally ...


2

Thank you very much! I had exactly the same problem. I tried answer #2 and it worked! The key for me was specifying the pixel size in the mosaic (16 bit unsigned), re-importing the coordinate system and specifying thumbnails as well as statistics and pyrmaids. The problem is probably that the 32 bit DEMS are too large.


2

Building on the good advice from Roy, try building a raster mosaic (or raster catalog) directly in your geodatabase. Check out the helpful reference on raster data models. To begin, in Arc catalog right click on your GDB and choose New > Mosaic Dataset... Again, in Arc catalog right click on the newly created mosaic dataset and select "Add Rasters..." ...


2

Raster datasets are sort of the 9.3 way of doing things. I'd consider creating a Mosaic Dataset. You can add whichever rasters you want and they'll be stitched together. Right click gdb -> New -> Mosaic Dataset To add rasters, right click the empty Mosaic Dataset -> Add Rasters (make sure to calculate statistics, build overviews, etc in advanced ...


2

Well if you are looking to merge all the images from a folder you can do a two step process. 1) Use command prompt to make a directory list file [ dir c:\temp\*.jpg /b /s >c:\temp\imagelist.txt ] 2) Using FWTools run gdal_merge [ gdal_merge -o c:\temp\mosaic.tif -q -v --optfile c:\temp\imagelist.txt ] This will make a file of all the images in a ...


2

Most likely what happened is, in the process of moving the data from one computer to another, the paths to the imagery referenced in the mosaic dataset became invalid. What you can do is repair the paths in the mosaic dataset. You can do this either with geoprocessing tools or an interactive dialog, as shown below. Be sure to increase the folder path depth ...


2

Geobase would have been my first suggestion but aside from the way the tiles are separated to relatively small areas, I have personally had many issues with the data itself. See our own wiki for more details. If I remember correctly then 1 arc-seconds (about 30m resolution) (SRTM1) coverage only includes continental US in and parts of Canada but does not ...


2

DEMs have 1 band which hold elevation values. For comparison, a color image has three bands (Red, Green, Blue). You can check information about any raster dataset by right-clicking on the layer > Layer Properties > Source. Other particularly useful information located here include pixel depth, cell size, coordinate system, and format. Make sure to set ...


2

The simple solution: contrary to other data sources for Geoserver, it seems that when you deal with an ImageMosaic you strictly need your data folder to be owned by user/usergroup tomcat6. So changing the user/usergroup from root to tomcat6 resolved the problem for me. Useful commands for Linux: display file ownership: $ ls -l (2nd column: owner, 3rd ...


2

You cannot upload any file with your cURL code. Becasue it sends "Content-type: text/plain" data not a file to the server. GeoServer accepts uploading files in zip (binary) with this "Content-type: application/zip". So you must try this code (change file path, name etc. for your system) curl -v -u admin:geoserver -XPUT -H "Content-type: application/zip" ...


2

I will answer my own question. I have fixed the problem by compressing the images using GDAL utilities with LZW compression method instead of the JPEG compression. Also, I have used Layer Group in GeoServer to group the 21 images together instead of ImageMosaic plugin and the problem was gone!


2

Getting into Raster processing with GDAL is a very effective place to start and this tutorial on Geoprocessing with Python using Open Source GIS is great if a little old. The first few lessons are on Vector data but you get to the Raster soon enough. Also, reading the ESRI documentation on raster data is very informative about processing methods and ...


2

Check if the source data uses paletted colours. You can not reproject them easily, because interpolating paletted colours will fail. Convert the source data to RGB or RGBA, and the interpolation during reprojection will deliver good looking results. Furthermore, check if NODATA value conflicts with any used colour.


1

I would build a GDAL virtual image using (something like): gdalbuildvrt myimage.vrt images/*.tif and then tile that using either gdal2tiles or gdal_retile: gdal2tiles.py myimage.vrt outputDir or gdal_retile.py -tileIndex tileIndexName myimage.vrt


1

The solution I came up with is as follows: -Create Raster Dataset -Add the images I want to mosaic to that dataset -Select 'Blend' as the mosaic operator (follow this YouTube video for more step-by-step, all you have to do differently is change the Mosaic Operator). Arc will automatically blend over the entire overlapping width. It's not perfect ...


1

Based on the help you linked to, it doesn't seem like that is setting that can be changed. I know it's semantics, but you'll notice that it says: Blend Width—Defines the distance in pixels (at the display scale) used by the Blend mosaic operator. For the other options, it says "Allows you to define" or "You choose". However, if seamlines are present, ...


1

I would suggest to build a virtual Dataset with gdalbuildvrt, where you can specify to add an alpha channel with the -addalpha parameter for the 3-band-datasets. http://www.gdal.org/gdalbuildvrt.html Alternatively you can use gdal_translate: gdal_translate -of vrt -expand rgba Or have a look at the last example of the manpage of gdal_translate: ...


1

Vegetation indices are not calculated from radiance, they are calculated from reflectance. Radiance is the quantity of radiation emitted from a surface within a solid angle of the instantaneous field of view of the sensor, with units of Watts per square meter per steradian. This will vary depending on illumination conditions (how sunny it is) and the ...



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