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8

GDAL supports .img format, both the basic Imagine and the extended Imagine (greater than 2GB), thus any software that utilizes GDAL drivers would support ERDAS Imagine. The most workable and well documented that I have seen is QGIS. It is also open source and therefore free.


5

you can either check "update georeferencing" or create a new rectified image using "rectify". These tools are in the drop down menu of th georeferencing toolbar.


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Only managed to find a couple of sources for SAR images and data: You can download SAR images from here which are mostly focused on ecological sites such as forests: You can download SAR samples from here which contain fairly large datasets (note: the last 4 links at the bottom of the SAR section are dead) Hope this helps.


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You can get Sentinel-1 data from scihub.esa. Requires only registration (And most likely, non-commercial use). As Sentinel-1 has just become operational the archive is not very extensive but should grow quite quickly. You can set request data-access propospal on Alaska Satellite Facility. Some data open access. For ALOS-PALSAR you must be a resident of the ...


4

If you want to show your geometries as vectors instead of images there are a couple of tricks that you can apply to reduce the load of your page: Use TopoJSON instead of GeoJSON Remove all the attributes that you are not going to use in the applicaation and also the whitspaces. Taking into account your visualization scale, simplify your geometries and ...


4

Panchromatic images are created when the imaging sensor is sensitive to a wide range of wavelengths of light, typically spanning a large part of the visible part of the spectrum. Here is the thing, all imaging sensors need a certain minimum amount of light energy before they can detect a difference in brightness. If the sensor is only sensitive (or is only ...


3

Try File -> Import -> Desktop Publishing Formats -> JPGIDRIS. You can then mosaic the individual imported jpegs now in Idrisi format.


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You can also try the GIS icon library by Robert Szczepanek: http://robert.szczepanek.pl/icons.php


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The good people at Boundless have built on top of the well known Silk icon set to make a set of GIS specific icons called GeoSilk. You can download them from the SVN repository.


2

http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Bigmap is the most used approach for your task. Another tool is taho.exe (if you are on Windows). You can learn more about it from here: http://www.dimitri-junker.de/eng/html/openstreetmap.html You can switch the language to English under Bearbeiten -> Optionen. An English help manual is included in the Docu folder. ...


2

In answer to your first question I found confirmation of the default compression quality (number) on the help page entitled Compression (Environment setting) where it says (with my bolding): If JPEG, JPEG_YCbCr, or JPEG 2000 is selected, you can also set the compression quality to control how much loss the image will be subjected to by the ...


2

According to a powerpoint announcement of ENVI 5.0, Katalog should be available via the Exelis Code library. Unfortunately, the code library is offline at the time of writing due to some legal issues. Other authors have already moved their stuff to github (e.g. the ENVI Plugins by Devin White). I could not find the KATALOG software either, but I suppose you ...


2

Try converting your file to another/the same format (Raster/conversion/translate(convert format).There you can define a value for "no data", which you can set to a number different than 0. Hope it helps


2

From the esri help pages... When you are in the edit report layout page. Select picture under element on the left hand side and add it to whatever location you want on your report. When you click on the box, on the right hand side there is a place to add your source which you have 3 choices: Source 1: choose a field You can choose any Raster or ...


2

I believe you need a minimum of 3 points to translate, scale, and rotate. The procedure and open source code for doing this is explained here: http://docs.opencv.org/doc/tutorials/imgproc/imgtrans/warp_affine/warp_affine.html I'm assuming your images are not georeferenced, so it should not matter what your map projection is since the user only has to ...


2

JAXA have made global L-band SAR mosaics at 50 m spatial resolution available from the PALSAR sensor: http://www.eorc.jaxa.jp/ALOS/en/palsar_fnf/fnf_index.htm Registration is required to download the data.


2

rasterImage draws a raster image at a given location and size. Below is a very rough example, which you can hopefully adjust to your needs. (I made up some location points, you would obviously have to use yours.) library(rgdal) library(png) # load icons in PNG format iconfile1 <- ...


1

In the ArcGIS Help 10.2 there is a page called Managing the performance of ArcGIS map services which discusses options for addressing any display performance issues and includes the approach that you mention in your question: Precompute information results when you can do so. For example, you can precompute the maps that are delivered with ArcGIS for ...


1

The software to choose depends on your objectives. For GIS purpose, QGIS is great. It includes many toolboxes for spatial analysis. It is an open source alternative to ArcGIS. For image processing, you can use Monteverdi. Monteverdi is particularly usefull if you have very large images. It is an open source alternative to Erdas.


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I just spoke with a NAIP representative that sent me the following info sheet for NAIP sensors - apparently the range is 675 - 940 um, but depends on the sensor that collected the image. Here is the info sheet I received.


1

Instead of trying to import your shapefile into another remote sensing program, I would rather suggest that you export the attributes of your object as csv (there is a csv export in eCognition), then you can run the classification from data analysis softwares (Matlab, R, Numpy...). Then you can join the table to your shapefile in a GIS. Or you can continue ...


1

As others have mentioned, the best practical way to determine which bands are which is to look at the source metadata, which is widely available for common products like ASTER and Rapideye. You can also derive much information about the bands doing a little legwork in Erdas. This is a useful skill to have if you are given, for example, a Rapideye image ...


1

Look here for Aster info. VNIR_Band1 = 0.52-0.60 (green) VNIR_Band2 = 0.63-0.69 (red) VNIR_Band3N = 0.76-0.86 (NIR) Rapid eye comes in GeoTiff format comprised of 5 bands (listed here). The images that you have are probably composites. RGB is Red, Green, Blue that represent RGB, NIRREG (possibly NIR and near edge), and color infrared (CIR). In CIR, NIR ...


1

In order to know the wavelengths or colors that bands in a raster represent, you typically need to know what instrument they were created with. Some software can make automatic assignments based on the file format, but the labels might not always be clear. I recall doing some work in ENVI where it would give you the wavelengths but not the band numbers. I ...


1

For your Aster Image, 1 is green, 2 is red and 3 is near infra-red For RapidEye, 1 is blue, 2 is green, 3 is red, 4 is red edge and 5 is near infra-red. So your second image is Near Infra-Red/RedEdge/Green Usually, with 3 bands the image is either RGB or NIR/R/G. When I don't have a clue, I try 321 and 123 composites. With RGB one of the combination ...


1

If you grab lat/lon coordinates from GE, you have to set the target CRS in the Georeferencer settings to EPSG:4326. If you take coordinates from the QGIS map canvas using the Openlayers plugin, the units are (Google) meters, and the target has to be EPSG:3857. You can not mix both methods.


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I find the simplest way that it can be done is from a georeferenced image by origin and cell size, if you can determine the Cell (row,column) on the image: X = origin X + (Column * Cell Width) Y = origin Y + (Row * Cell height) Usually.. the world file for a png (pgw) will give the top left cell and cell size in a 6 parameter transformation, be aware the ...


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Check out this ESRI link using attachments It states "since attachments are stored inside the geodatabase, I can share a geodatabase or make a layer or map package and all the attached files are included with the data automatically."


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Your problem is a less responsive browser when displaying the very large set of vector data, which presumably is the result of trying to render each/every node of your data set. This is exactly the issue WMS and TMS are used to solve - however, since you are looking for an alternative solution, try Google encoding your polylines which simplifies the geometry ...


1

It sounds like you are referencing an Image Service. To utilize an Image Service from within the Javascript API, you would need to follow through with the publishing rules, and create the service on your ArcServer installation. This would only work if you have the png already georeferenced in an mxd file (overlaying the png at specific GPS coordinates). ...



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