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Have you tried using Notepad as an in-between-step? After creating your excel file, copy everything in a notepad file, then choose "save as". Make sure that you change the type of file as "All files", then the name of your file must be prompted like "name.csv". (you must use " " for the filename) EDIT: yes, if you copy directly from Excel the data ...


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I would take OGR (ogr2ogr) and set the layer creation option COLUMN_TYPES: -lco COLUMN_TYPES field1=INTEGER,field1=FLOAT8. That's another layer creation option as Mike T suggested above. In general, I would consider switching to GeoPackage since Shapefiles are deprecated and have deficiencies like field names limited to 10 chars.


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The number width/precision is specified in the DBF file, as support by GDAL/OGR with get/set width/precision (i.e. see API). Looking at the documentation for the PostgreSQL / PostGIS driver, there is a PRECISION layer creation option: This may be "YES" to force new fields created on this layer to try and represent the width and precision information, if ...


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For the second point you can use the Information_schema and select the needed columns. "SELECT column_name, data_type FROM information_schema.columns" and use this information in a loop with an ALTER TABLE statement together with SET DATA TYPE to change the types. This of course needs to be inside a loop for all tables which you also get from ...


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To sum up, this code works, as Michael helped: >>> arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True fdList = ["Dataset_A", "Dataset_B", "Dataset_C"] folList = ["D:\\GIS_Temp\Folder A", "D:\\GIS_Temp\\Folder B", "D:\\GIS_Temp\\Folder C"] workRange = range(len(fdList)) for thisIndex in workRange: fd = fdList[thisIndex] arcpy.env.workspace = ...


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This could work, based on answer Michael wrote, but there are still some problems: >>> fdList = ["Datase_A", "Dataset_B", "Dataset_C"] folList = ["D:\\GIS_Temp\Folder A", "D:\\GIS_Temp\\Folder B", "D:\\GIS_Temp\\Folder C"] workRange = range(len(fdList)) for thisIndex in workRange: fd = fdList[thisIndex] arcpy.env.workspace = ...


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I suspect that your script is failing because the output already exists, to avoid this set overwrite to True, which is easier than check and delete, but may not be what you need in the long run. Putting together your scraps into a contiguous codeblock: # set overwrite = True so it won't crash if # the output already exists arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True ...


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If the data should be located in Maine, UTM 19N looks rather good: Otherwise it could be some State Plane coordinate system, depending on the state you are working in. You might have seen nothing, if you set the CRS wrongly to WGS84 (which is default in QGIS without prompting), and a Google background layer in EPSG:3857. The coordinates are out of range ...


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Have you made sure that there are no other layers overlaying the view? If a raster layer for example would be over the point layer, you can not see the points because they would be physically under the raster image.


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It didn't just decide to do the "summary"; that's how you submitted it. It depends on your ultimate goal with the data, but you have at least a couple options: Create one raster for each attribute of interest. My suspicion is that this is what you should do, because I've never encountered a reason to use option 2... or Create another column in your ...


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As pointed by @wenzeslaus this question was asked on grass-user mailing list and it was answered. According to Martin Landa, it happened that on 64 bit installations the liblas_c.dll file was not available. Then, the build environment was updated and the OP there confirmed the problem was solved. A re-package of GRASS 7.0.3 to include liblas for 64 bit ...


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XML files can hold any kind of data. If a software like QGIS should be able to read it, the software (or the developer) needs to know the XML schema of the data. QGIS is able to read Openstreetmap XML data, and (with the LandXML plugin) data provided by Land Information New Zealand. If you need support for other XML sources, you might have to do it on your ...


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QGIS looks for a CR/LF at the end of each row in a .csv file. This is how Excel (and other applications) on Windows machines ends each row. On a Mac the default Excel .csv file only has a CR (i.e., there is no LF) at the end of each row. Therefore QGIS reads the file as one long row. The solution, as first suggested by ericO, is to save the file as a Windows ...


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It's a known issue that pops up now and again with adding XY data that's been ongoing for years (see this ArcGIS Knowledge Base article): From section #3: There is a missing negative from the X field values when the values are decimal degrees (geographic coordinates). SOLUTION: Use the field calculator to add a negative to the X field's ...


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There is an unsupported excel datastore in GeoTools that can be added to GeoServer to work directly from your spreadsheet. But the easiest answer would be to open the file in QGIS and save it as a shapefile.


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If you have only 400 sites, I'd recommend converting it to JSON. Or you could load the CSV directly using a Leaflet plugin like this: https://github.com/mapbox/leaflet-omnivore Or if you want to point and click, load it into CartoDB. Get in touch if you want someone to do it for you =)



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