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Found the solution. Albeit without SQL style joining, but this structure operates in the same way and is clearer so it is preferable. Double click on the layer you wish to join extra attributes to; Click on 'Joins' on the left; Click the '+' symbol at the bottom to add a new join to the double clicked layer; Select the join layer (layer you wish to take ...


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Rather than a Join, try creating a Relationship. This will allow you to select one or more weed control blocks, then use the relationship to select the associated records in the table. Note that you may need to import your CSV file into a geodatabase in order to use the relationship, which relies on a unique Object ID for each record.


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fYou do not have to resave the table with the Join in place if you used a standard join and have edit rights in the directory where the shapefile is stored. I assume you added a field to the shapefile and want to fill it in. Select the table field from the Field Calculator field list box to get the fully qualified name of the joined table field (i.e., ...


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In most real-world datasets, the specific variation you describe is just the tip of an iceberg. You will typically uncover all manner of variations that will eventually defeat any exact match or scripted code/regex solution. Therefore I would use a Fuzzy Lookup algorithmn for this requirement. If the data volume is small and the task is a "one off", I ...


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I did not know that the FID was not preserved by this tool. Strange. As Chris recommended, calculate a unique ID for each point before you use the buffer tool. The unique ID I use for all my points is a concatenation of the X and Y coordinates in a text field I call XY_LINK. You should be able to create a join field without creating any new feature ...


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In QGIS you could try to sanitize your column with spaced characters by using regexp_replace( 'Some street 12 A', '\\s([0-9]+)\\s\w', ' \\1') via Field calculator. You will have to replace 'Some street 12 A' with your column: it should be working. Hope this helps.


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In SQL, assuming your database supports regular expressions, you could do something like the following (postGres example). Something similar in oracle should also work. T-SQL is a bit more tricky as it doesn't have regular expressions. UPDATE someTable SET someCol = regexp_replace(someCol,'(\m[0-9]+)\M[ ]+\m([a-z]+)\M','\1\2','gi') WHERE someCol ~* ...


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You could try with a replace in Python, removing all [0...9] followed with a space. def RemoveWhiteAfterNumber(addressField): a = addressField for i in range(10): a = a.replace( str(i) +" ", str(i)) return a RemoveWhiteAfterNumber(!addressField!)


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Does every address end in the form '12 A' or '12A'? If so, you could split on whitespace (the default, in python anyway), then test the last element to see whether it contains digits or not. Combine the last two elements if the last element is a plain alpha character. This could also work testing the last element for length, provided the last element of an ...


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Just as a reminder: also make sure the classes or tables are part of the same geodatabase AND make sure the keyfields on which the join will be operated are of the same type.


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Here is a simple workaround, (but of course it would be cleaner to do it with an insertcursor in Python). 1) Add the X andd Y coordinates for your points (from field calculator, or with the tool in Data management > features) 2) join the table of your point on your excel file 3) export the excel file to another table, and add it as point using "Make XY ...


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Yes, you want the Spatial Join tool. The difference between this and just right-clicking and joining your layer is that there is an option to select the Join Operation. If you change this to Join-One-To-Many your line feature will be repeated for every point it intersects: JOIN_ONE_TO_MANY —If multiple join features are found that have the same ...


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Finally it worked with the 'Mosaic To New Raster' tool. I used MAXIMUM as Mosaic Operator. I have no idea why it works now, suddenly, and did not work when I tried it earlier. But now I have my layer and that´s important ^^. Thanks for all the answers and helping comments!


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Try the Combine tool which takes multiple input rasters and assigns a new value for each unique combination of input values in the output raster


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If you want a single raster output, probably map algebra with something like : Con(IsNull("rail"), "buffer", "rail") Con("rail" > 0, "rail", "buffer") will work (with rail and buffer the names of your layers. In the firest case, the background is No Data, and in the second case it is 0. Otherwise, you might want to use "composite band" to create a 2 ...


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Have a look at the Conditional Toolset in Spatial Analyst. Without knowing the type of values in your rasters, it's difficult to say which one will be best for you. But I think the Con tool will probably do what you want.


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An alternative to exporting the results of a join is to use the Join Field tool instead of creating a join. This tool directly adds the attributes to the feature class based on a join (one step) as opposed to joining and exporting (two step).


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If you want to preserve a permanent copy of the fields that you have joined to a feature class, you need to export it to a new feature class. Right-click the layer in the TOC and choose Data > Export Data.


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The Make Query Table tool, based on GID will get what you want - every GID in the shape will get all matching GIDs in the xlsx (so, duplicate records). This will potentially generate a very large number of records. For example, if a GID appears in one table four times and six in the other, you will get 24 records. Note the result is temporary and must be ...



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