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You can simply use join. Import your CSV into qgis and mark 'no geometry' to get a non-spatial data table. Open your shape files properties and choose the 'joins' tab. Add a new join with the '+' sign on the bottom-left, and define the Primary and foriegn Key fields. You can also define which fields to join. That is it. In case of mismatch, rows won't be ...


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Just for completeness, I'd like to add another solution based on using spatial SQL queries. Suppose you have a roads layer in a Spatialite database, for example. I'll assume this roads table has a column 'id' and a columm 'volume'. To get those linestrings that are duplicates (end points are equal), together with the sum of the volumes you could do: SELECT ...


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EDIT: as mentioned below, the code I suggest here is my first one, thus may be inefficient. I posted it in code-review SE, so whoever wishes might follow the post, to either correct the code, or to obtain a better, more-efficient version of it. So this is my first PyQGIS code, which is aimed to do what you asked for, namely to find those pairs of lines (or ...


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As I mentioned in comments, no join is currently possible because there are no records in one table to join those from the other to. The simplest, easiest, fastest thing to do is create your line features and enter a unique ID attribute for each record that is found in the table you already have. You can then join your table to the features using that ID ...



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