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11

In the Help for Supported raster dataset file formats it says: ArcCatalog only recognizes the .jpg file extension by default. To add .jpeg or .jpe files to ArcMap without renaming them, add those file extensions to ArcCatalog or drag those files from Windows Explorer into your map.


10

There is no direct route to convert an image into a shapefile format. Your jpg map has no spatial reference. You can load it into arcmap but it won't know where to put it. In order to tell arcmap where it belongs in space you have to provide geographic reference points, hence the term 'georeferencing'. In ArcGIS this is done via the Georeferencing ...


10

There are many free tools like: gdal rasterize Map Tyler it is easy to do with Python and modules like Shapely and a simple for loop: But in Python, the reference is Mapnik and Getting Started In Python You create a map (width and height in pixels, background color, etc) You create Styles which determines how the data is rendered You add a datasource ...


7

By default an RGB image will be written to an RGB color model JPEG image, but this is not actually the most efficient way of writing to JPEG. It is better to convert to the YCbCr color space, and encode that. This is in fact the typical form of standalone JPEGs and what GDAL will produce when writing to a free standing JPEG file. Compressing a 4K x 2.6K ...


7

You can make ArcCatalog recognize .jpeg files by adding it as a File Type in ArcCatalog options. Inside ArcCatalog: From the main menu choose: Customize Select ArcCatalog Options Under the File Types tab choose New Type... Enter "jpeg" and "JPEG Image" .jpeg images will now display in ArcCatalog. UPDATE: For ArcMap, you have to separately add .jpeg as ...


6

QGIS has a plugin called "Photo2Shape" that will convert the geotagged coordinates of the photo into a shapefile. You can then use the "eVis" plugin to set up hotlinks to the photos themselves, and launch a photo viewer by clicking on the attribute field.


6

When you save your JPEG in GIMP, expand the 'Advanced Options' when the 'Export as JPEG' dialog box comes up. Un-check the 'Progressive' box and then click 'Export'. Your JPEG is then readable in QGIS. "Progressive" changes the encoding to display the image at increasingly higher quality levels until the image is fully loaded. QGIS is expecting standard ...


6

You have a few options for getting the road as a vector. You could download the Open Street Map road layer. This has been prepared by Geofabrik. You'd have to select out the road you're after. You could digitise the road manually. This involves creating a new polyline layer and tracing the road. It looks like you'll need to create a point layer too, ...


6

This is currently not supported. The only way you are able to do this is to embed or link a png in a SVG file. Adding support for loading other image formats shouldn't be too hard for a future version.


5

(1) and (2) are possible with eVis plugin (Documentation). Ad (3): You should be able to use Field Calculator to add the path to the filenames you already in attribute table. Field calculator is described here: http://www.qgis.org/wiki/Calculating_field_values. You can use + operator to concatenate strings.


5

Have a look on d.out.file command. See that page and format option. BMP is available.


5

I suspect that there are a great number of factors that go into the choice of image format and compression scheme: Image dimensions Bit depth Image complexity (images with large areas of similar colors may actually compress better by a lossless codec than a lossy codec, and some codecs handle complex, detailed areas better than others) Multi-band support ...


4

Yes there is, but before that, what software do you have available? To georeference a non georeferenced jpeg you will need to know/have one of two sources of information. 1) Access to vector or raster data that covers the same geographical area in the jpeg 2) Knowledge of the geographical extents of the jpeg (ie: Lat/Long cooridinates or UTM coordinates) ...


4

You need to include empty quotes for parameters you aren't changing. Since resolution is the 6th parameter, you shouldn't place it directly after parameter 2 (out_jpeg). The empty quotes are place markers. Example: arcpy.mapping.ExportToJPEG(mxd, project, "", "", "", resolution = 200) You don't need to put quotes in for parameters after the last one you ...


4

You could add all of the layers to a mxd, then loop through them and run arcpy.mapping.ExportToJPEG(map_document, out_jpeg, {data_frame}, {df_export_width}, {df_export_height}, {resolution}, {world_file}, {color_mode}, {jpeg_quality}, {progressive}) for each layer in the map.


3

If you are using ArcGIS 10.1 then the new RasterClassifiedSymbology class of arcpy.mapping may be what you need to look at.


3

I had posted a question on creating images from vector data that you might find useful. The accepted answer, the combination of shapely, ogr, matplotlib, and numpy seems like it would work nicely for you.


3

How about using GDAL? It is available via FWTools (easier install) on Windows, via apt-get on Ubuntu, and via a binary for OSX. Once you have GDAL just go ahead and use: gdal_translate -of JP2OpenJPEG <input> <output> or gdal_translate -of JPEG2000 <input> <output> The above command uses the built in JP2 format conversion. ...


3

You could integrate Mapnik for rendering the images.


3

This similar question has answers that use FME to convert DWG to JPG. The process will be similar for converting shapefiles. This example has example workspaces you can download. FME is well suited to handling batch processes. For example, you can point the reader to a folder and it will include all shapefiles in the folder. I created a simple ...


3

In answer to your first question I found confirmation of the default compression quality (number) on the help page entitled Compression (Environment setting) where it says (with my bolding): If JPEG, JPEG_YCbCr, or JPEG 2000 is selected, you can also set the compression quality to control how much loss the image will be subjected to by the ...


3

Based on your comment, it sounds like you are adding each raster band separately, instead of the raster dataset. When you use the Add Data button and navigate to your jpg, don't double click on the jpg filename and select the individual bands, just select the file itself and click the Add button.


3

You can georeference a JPG image if you can identify parts of the image in another basemap or geo-referenced dataset of any kind. Get the georeferencing toolbar from the Customize Menu. When you bring the image in (add it like you would any other data) it won't match anything spatially so you will need to match areas in the JPEG with areas in your basemap ...


3

It sounds you are after automatic raster to vector conversion and the extension to ArcGIS for Desktop that does that (as mentioned in a comment by @radouxju) is ArcScan: ArcScan provides tools that allow you to convert scanned images into vector-based feature layers. The process of converting raster data to vector features is known as vectorization. ...


3

JPEG2000 Pros: Better compression than JPEG Supports both lossy and lossless compression, JPEG is lossy only Supports any number of bands, JPEG only supports 3 bands Supports more datatypes (including floating point), JPEG only supports 8 bit (byte) data Internal precomputed multiresolution representation (aka pyramids) JPEG2000 Cons: Limited ...


2

Here is a link to the QGIS forum reporting something similar in terms of band combinations. This article is referring to rasters generated in GRASS but there maybe some similarities. Another trick that has worked for me in the past. Make sure the .jpg file has an associated world file .jgw and a projection file .prj. These can be generated from exporting ...


2

It seems QGIS doesn't set the correct band in the jpg raster. You can fix this by double clicking your raster layer and changing the bands Where it says Red, Green, Blue Band they must all be the right color bands from the jpg. Change Green band drop down to Band 2 and Blue band drop down to Band 3


2

You can use the GDAL library by: r.out.gdal InRaster.dem format=JPEG output=out.jpg have a look at the documentation here.


2

The simplest way would be to call gdal_rasterize using subprocess.call(), but I suspect it doesn't do any interpolation so it would alias to the point of illegibility if you generated a thumbnail-sized image straight from the data. So you should generate a "reasonably sized"* temporary image and use the Python image library to scale it to the size you want. ...


2

I used RasterPaletteResolver transformer. It helps.



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