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I usually do this using QGIS. I load the kml layer, save as shapefile and add the columns that are necessary for rendering. Then I open a connection to my postgis database, delete everything inside the current view, and copy-and-paste the kml data into the postgis layer. I have created a separate bboxdb inside postgis for such cases, so my original osm ...


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You could save out the KML and then use notepad++ to do a search and replace using regular expressions. So in notepad++ I would use: and in the replace tab just place <description></description>


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This might have to do with some browser security features in Firefox that block access to local files, that aren't present in chrome/IE. It might require using a proxy to make it look like it's from somewhere else, or a workaround to the local restriction. A few links below that might explain a bit better. Blog post from a GIS developer who had a kml ...


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My favorite app for doing these kinds of things is Locus map free. It can import KML file amongst many other formats, and can work completely offline. If you need a base map, you can either download it within the app (for a fee) or add your own data either in mbtiles, or one of the other myriad formats that it supports.


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Most GIS desktop software apps have ability to plot table or csv data based on lng/lat or x/y values to generate a point event layer. Event layers may then be exported to a GIS layer (e.g. shapefile), and then you may run a spatial analysis interpolation tool or script to create the raster surface similar to your link example. Finally, these raster layers ...



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