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As you've noticed Google Earth doesn't tessellate polygons. This means that you will need to tessellate your polygon on your own. You could use something like Triangle to do this: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~quake/triangle.html Here is a list of libraries which will allow you to do this. Some of them might or might not have a program to do this: ...


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From the Google Developers help for Keyhole Markup Language it is clear that Google Earth will only use one KML file from a KMZ no matter how many you put into the folder you zip up to create it: Include only one .kml file. (When Google Earth opens a KMZ file, it scans the file, looking for the first .kml file in this list. It ignores all subsequent ...


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If you run print(leyte); and open the Console, you'll see the FeatureCollection is trying to draw the polygon with geo_column: ISO, which is clearly not your KML geometry column from the Fusion table. I was able to display the polygon instead just by specifying the correct geometry column, which in this case is called geometry: var leyte = ...


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In the search box in ArcMap type, "To KML"; there are two tools. Layer to KML: "This tool converts a feature or raster layer into a KML file containing a translation of Esri geometries and symbology. This file is compressed using ZIP compression, has a .kmz extension, and can be read by any KML client including ArcGIS Explorer, ArcGlobe, and Google Earth." ...


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As Midavalo said, you should see Conversion tools in your Toolbox. In there, open the To KML Toolset. You want Layer to KML. Follow the instructions. If you're not seeing any of the toolboxes, I think there may be something wrong with your installation and I recommend re-installing ArcGIS.


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A simple function can do that for you. Here's how: allKmlLayers <- function(kmlfile){ lyr <- ogrListLayers(kmlfile) mykml <- list() for (i in 1:length(lyr)) { mykml[i] <- readOGR(kmlfile,lyr[i]) } names(mykml) <- lyr return(mykml) } use it with: kmlfile <- "se\\file.KML" mykml <- allKmlLayers(kmlfile)


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use ogr2ogr with the -simplify flag. Simplify tolerance must be in map units. If your coordinates are in degree you must also use degree (0.00009 degree ~ 1 m close to the equator) org2ogr -f KML -simplify 0.0001 outfile.kml infile.kml


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Try ogr2ogr ogr2ogr -f KML scotland.kml infuse_ctry_2011.shp However, your shapefile is very detailed and the output KML is huge (54 MB). Most apps won't be able to handle such large KML files. Do you need all the details or can you simplify the geometry a bit to reduce the number of vertices? Try ogr2ogr -f KML -simplify 10 scotland.kml ...


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Yes, I reproduced this behaviour with a simple KML generated using umap. The tool (http://bdferris.github.io/kml-to-gtfs-shapes/) will only convert polylines, as it states in the first sentence of the website: This page provides a simple tool to generate a GTFS shapes.txt file from polyline entries in a KML file. (emphasis mine). Polygons dont work ...


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Step 1: Make a Selection of the specific sub-polygon Step 2: Save your selection as a separate feature, but make sure to choose GeoJSON as your file save type


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Still not aware of any Arc tool that does this satisfactorily, but I posted a script here: Exporting 3GB ArcGIS Raster to KML without losing resolution?


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Solution for ArcGis (you will need the 3D analyst extension). 1) Load the .asc file in ArcMap. 2) In the Arctoolbox - > Conversion Tool > From KML to Layer (to transform the KML in a file suitable for ArcGis). The new file automatically loads in ArcMap 3) Right click on your converted road and select "Convert feature to graphics" 4) Select the created ...



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