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11

On a Mac, where QGIS uses the Kyngchaos.com GDAL 1.9 Complete framework, or on any platform where QGIS has been compiled against a GDAL build with support for the Google LIBKML driver, you can open .kmz files directly using the open dialog and selecting the All Files (*) option, or simply drag/drop onto QGIS. (Otherwise, you will need to decompress the .kmz ...


10

as far as I know, you are right: vectors in qgis are read and written by ogr. qgis 1.8 uses the lastest gdal/ogr, which is 1.91. you can read zipped shape-files, but *.kmz, which actually are a zip-archive containing *.kml-file(s) need to be unzipped manually before importing


7

Recent versions of gdal_translate have support for KML Superoverlay. Although it is not yet documented on the GDAL website the following can be used: gdal_translate.exe -of KMLSUPEROVERLAY c:\in.tif c:\out.kmz -co FORMAT=JPEG This will save a tiled version in a kmz file using jpeg compression. On windows you can automate using forfiles /m *.tif /c "cmd ...


6

QGIS has a plugin called "Photo2Shape" that will convert the geotagged coordinates of the photo into a shapefile. You can then use the "eVis" plugin to set up hotlinks to the photos themselves, and launch a photo viewer by clicking on the attribute field.


6

You can use GDAL tool inside Quantum GIS. Its free and it works fine. Install Quantum GIS and Gdaltools and you'll have a set of tool for raster/image processing. The one you want would be vectorize (gdal_polygonize). Cheers


5

One of the fastest and easiest possible solutions uses a short program written with the free open source program R (the R project for statistical computing). The following code computes the distance matrix (using spherical distances) between two arrays of (lon, lat) coordinates named customers and facilities and stores it in an array distances (with rows ...


4

Here is a guide to create and import KML files into Quantum. It does not work for KMZ files so these would need to first be decompressed to be used in this manner.


3

PostGIS comes with a shapefile loader called shp2pgsql which converts a shapefile into the SQL statements that are needed to load the data into PostGIS. You can find a detailed description of the command and the options needed on this page. But it boils down to something like: shp2pgsql -I -s 4326 input.shp schema.table > output.sql


3

If you convert your 3D KML to collada (.dae) a Google Earth Model - using Google Sketchup http://sketchup.google.com/download/ Then you can import this MODEL into ArcGIS with ArcScene. Here is a youtube video showing how this can be done. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udhm3yxVinc


3

ArcGIS can read KML files and since 9.3 also KMZ via the Data Interoperability Extension. From version 10 you must install this separately. The basic version of DI extension does not require a special licence and certainly lets you read GML and (from memory) I think it also reads KML. I have been used to having the full version so I forget where the free ...


3

So far I came up with this: I replaced the first 2 lines of the original KML with the following 3 lines: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2" xmlns:gx="http://www.google.com/kml/ext/2.2"> Then I replaced the lower case "z" of the Timespan by uppercase "Z", like these: ...


2

If you have your placemarks in order in the kmz file, the task will be fairly simple (and can be accomplished in a text editor). Either save the placemarks as a kml file (right click and "Save place as"), or change the file extension of the kmz file to zip and extract the zip file (a kmz file is simply a zipped up kml file(s)). Here you can open up the kml ...


2

The simplest solution I can think of would be to import the shapefile into PostGIS using Shapefile to DBF loader (or if in another format write a scipt to upload using ogr2ogr). Then once in PostGIS you can create the dump file. If you use PgAdmin then both these operations are very easy as the shapefile loader is a plugin to PgAdmin and to dump, just ...


2

Those look like the grids for the National Topographic System in Canada. They can be downloaded from Geogratis as the Vector Indexes of the National Topographic System of Canada. There is a folder in there called kml_files full of .kmz files. If you prefer, you can get them more easily by downloading them zipped (15mb) at all scales from the WMS in ...


2

It should not be too hard to achieve this by converting the PDF to an image format (say Tiff) and georeferencing that image and projecting it in the same projection as the data you are overlaying. You will not be 100% accurate but with care you can get a good result. A few random thoughts: As seems typical with so many maps, there are no graticules or ...


2

Since you are using arcpy, you will be able to modify how the KMZ is exported. I am not sure if that is the kml_document or kml_id attribute controlling your hoover/click, but essentially you can control what value is in both of those attributes. See the KML documentation. Also, an excellent webcast from FME (even though that is not the software you are ...


2

If you need ruler distance, You can use the distance matrix tool in Quantum GIS. Quantum GIS can read your KMZ files. Then you can easily compute the distance matrix. Here is tutorial http://qgis.spatialthoughts.com/2013/04/tutorial-nearest-neighbor-analysis.html


2

You can do the following to name the kmz file and place it in the folder you want: arcpy.LayerToKML_conversion(fNAME, "c:\\temp\\" + str(fNAME) + ".kmz", "12000", ..... or in the env.workspace but a new subfoler - if it exists: arcpy.LayerToKML_conversion(fNAME, "KMZ\\" + str(fNAME) + ".kmz", "12000", .....


1

I'm not sure about that specific model, but many Garmin Nuvis do not allow uploading tracks or routes. It is only possible to upload waypoints/favourite locations. So to add your trails you would have to create a map as Garmin IMG file. There are a few tools which can do this. One free option is Javawa IMGfromGPX. Just specify your GPX track files as ...


1

I was able to extract Stakes for monitoring 2 stakes with the following code. I read over the official Python docs on the xml module: from xml.etree.ElementTree import fromstring kmz = '''<table><tr><td valign="top">Description</td><td>Stakes for monitoring 2 stakes </td></tr><tr bgcolor='3aafe8'><td ...


1

From the Australian Bureau of Statistics: The product includes boundaries of Local Government Areas, Statistical Local Areas, Statistical Divisions, Statistical Subdivisions, States, Statistical Districts, Major Statistical Regions, Statistical Regions and Statistical Region Sectors, current at 1 July 2011. The digital boundaries are available ...


1

Use DNRGPS it allows you to upload and download a variety of GPS formats to your gps and hence to any GIS softward package...and it is free and well supported.


1

If you use the coordinates in the doc.kml to create a jpeg world file[1] alongside your unzipped jpeg and tell QGIS that your image is EPSG:4326, you will then be able to warp it into your new projection. If you don't know how to calculate the world file, post the kml.doc in a gist and someone here can help you with the calculation. [1] ...


1

kmz with imagery (like Garmin Custom Maps) are raster files. So you have to use Add Raster Layer, not Add vector layer. Unfortunately, GDAL only supprts kml as vector layers. The problem is that the unzipped img files do not have georeferencing information stored by themselves. This is stored in the doc.kml file; but this is not in a format GDAL ...


1

This has recently been discussed on the Google Earth Help forum. Apparently this is a bug or a current limitation of Google Earth on iOS platforms. Only workaround at present is to have the KML/KMZ refer to inline images with full URL located on a public web site. Doesn't matter if embedded image is PNG or JPEG or uses STORED or DEFLATE compression. Google ...


1

Perhaps newer versions of QGIS will open kmz directly, but for now you need to extract the temp.kml file from the kmz and view that. Get a zip reading program, I suggest 7 Zip http://www.7-zip.org and open the zip file. With 7 Zip it is simply a matter of right clicking on the kmz, 'Open Archive' and drag the temp.kml to the file explorer or desktop (in ...


1

Once you have opened the KML file in QGIS, you can also save it as a shapefile by right-clicking on the file in the layers pane and selecting 'save as'.


1

You can add kml layers as any other kind of vector layer, using the "add vector" dialog.


1

See http://hub.qgis.org/projects/geotagphotos/wiki This plugin can be considered an upgrade of the already existing and very good photo2shape plugin (http://hub.qgis.org/projects/photo2shape), developed by Alexander Bruy. The Geotag and import photos plugin was developed by Alexander Bruy and funded/designed by Giovanni Manghi and Lolita Bizzarri ...


1

If you are talking about GeoTagged photos, I'll recommend ArcPhoto, available at http://resources.arcgis.com/gallery/file/geoprocessing/details?entryID=8C3643DC-1422-2418-8836-CF0510413D40



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