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5

One of the fastest and easiest possible solutions uses a short program written with the free open source program R (the R project for statistical computing). The following code computes the distance matrix (using spherical distances) between two arrays of (lon, lat) coordinates named customers and facilities and stores it in an array distances (with rows ...


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PostGIS comes with a shapefile loader called shp2pgsql which converts a shapefile into the SQL statements that are needed to load the data into PostGIS. You can find a detailed description of the command and the options needed on this page. But it boils down to something like: shp2pgsql -I -s 4326 input.shp schema.table > output.sql


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If you need ruler distance, You can use the distance matrix tool in Quantum GIS. Quantum GIS can read your KMZ files. Then you can easily compute the distance matrix. Here is tutorial http://qgis.spatialthoughts.com/2013/04/tutorial-nearest-neighbor-analysis.html


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The simplest solution I can think of would be to import the shapefile into PostGIS using Shapefile to DBF loader (or if in another format write a scipt to upload using ogr2ogr). Then once in PostGIS you can create the dump file. If you use PgAdmin then both these operations are very easy as the shapefile loader is a plugin to PgAdmin and to dump, just ...


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It should not be too hard to achieve this by converting the PDF to an image format (say Tiff) and georeferencing that image and projecting it in the same projection as the data you are overlaying. You will not be 100% accurate but with care you can get a good result. A few random thoughts: As seems typical with so many maps, there are no graticules or ...


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You can do the following to name the kmz file and place it in the folder you want: arcpy.LayerToKML_conversion(fNAME, "c:\\temp\\" + str(fNAME) + ".kmz", "12000", ..... or in the env.workspace but a new subfoler - if it exists: arcpy.LayerToKML_conversion(fNAME, "KMZ\\" + str(fNAME) + ".kmz", "12000", .....


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Since you are using arcpy, you will be able to modify how the KMZ is exported. I am not sure if that is the kml_document or kml_id attribute controlling your hoover/click, but essentially you can control what value is in both of those attributes. See the KML documentation. Also, an excellent webcast from FME (even though that is not the software you are ...


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The kml/kmz will be available offline, unless it is a network link. You will probably want to get an aerial or basemap of some kind and create on image overlay kml. This will let you have basemap data. Qgis works well on android and would allow data (of your own). You still would need a basemap clipped to your area of interest. Answer the device question and ...


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You could save out the KML and then use notepad++ to do a search and replace using regular expressions. So in notepad++ I would use: and in the replace tab just place <description></description>


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My favorite app for doing these kinds of things is Locus map free. It can import KML file amongst many other formats, and can work completely offline. If you need a base map, you can either download it within the app (for a fee) or add your own data either in mbtiles, or one of the other myriad formats that it supports.


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I think this is a pure GE limitation - and I am not aware of a direct way to force GE to spread the lines (that would be nice, though). Assuming that feature does not in fact exist - there are two options I can think of. Set different heights based on what you want to have priority (clamp the less important features to the ground and set a height of a few ...


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It is not currently supported to import KML or KMZ to Google Maps Engine Lite or Pro. https://support.google.com/mapsenginelite/answer/3024937 The only current way is to use MyMaps (with the Classic Version of Google Maps) Open the classic Google Maps and click My places in the top left corner. (Make sure you’re signed-in). Click Or create with classic My ...


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Taken from Garmin FAQ: More than one jpeg can preside in a kmz file. Jpeg must be saved without Progressive Image (typically found under advanced option). Images over 1 mega pixel (1024x1024 pixels, 512x2048 pixels, etc.) will be rendered at a reduced resolution on the unit. If this is causing a problem for your map, you can split the image and ...


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I think you must to adapt your code perl script to generate a functional code like below: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2"> <Document> <name>BalloonStyle.kml</name> <open>1</open> <Style id="exampleBalloonStyle"> ...


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I'm not sure about that specific model, but many Garmin Nuvis do not allow uploading tracks or routes. It is only possible to upload waypoints/favourite locations. So to add your trails you would have to create a map as Garmin IMG file. There are a few tools which can do this. One free option is Javawa IMGfromGPX. Just specify your GPX track files as ...


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I was able to extract Stakes for monitoring 2 stakes with the following code. I read over the official Python docs on the xml module: from xml.etree.ElementTree import fromstring kmz = '''<table><tr><td valign="top">Description</td><td>Stakes for monitoring 2 stakes </td></tr><tr bgcolor='3aafe8'><td ...


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import your KMZ in arcGIS using "KML to Layer". you can then use the "near" tool in arcgis.(http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//00080000001q000000) for "straight line" distances. For real distance, you need the Network analyst extension and the road network in a vector format as well (see ...


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You have not said how you converted the KML to shapefiles. Maybe something has gone wrong in that step. KML has some features that shapefiles don't allow and QGIS can not work with (like MultiGeometry), which might lead to an empty layer. You can activate the feature counter or look up in the attribute table if there are entries at all. Furthermore, you ...


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If you have more than one GeoTIFF, you can mosaic them before the conversion. For instance, you can make a virtual mosaic from all of them contained in the same directory: gdalbuildvrt mosaic.vrt *.tif gdal_translate -of KMLSUPEROVERLAY mosaic.vrt out.kmz


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I employed a trick described here and could get all your polygons in one page Trick is: First get the URL of the KML export. When viewing your Custom Map, right click the 'KML' link and copy the link to the clipboard (probably something like 'Copy Shortcut' or 'Copy Link Address' - depends on your browser) Now display your KML again. I have ...


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Right Clic on your raster>Save as>GTiff (try to keep Output Mode in Raw Data)


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With @Vince's help, I found a number of ruby libraries so far, one of which I should be able to hack together to make this work. Thanks Vince the douglas_peucker gem. https://rubygems.org/gems/douglas_peucker I haven't even begun to actually solve this yet, but when I do, I imagine I'll be taking each Polygon and converting it into an ExteriorRing, then ...


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To expand on my comment above - In 10.1/10.2 the export to KMZ tools as very "what you see is what you get". That is, what you see inside ArcMap is how the output KML should look. This is the reason you need either a layer from ArcMap or a LYR file for the Layer to KML tool (opposed to just features). For points, the symbology you have inside ArcMap gets ...



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