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1

There is no absolute accuracy in city coordinates. For example, New York City is 1214 kmĀ² large, and there is no definition which point is New York City. You can take the centroid of the border, or the Town Hall, or any point within the border you might prefer.


2

Depending on what you like I think you have a few options available. You will need two components The Location of the cities X,Y An Origin Destination Matrix (this requires a Network in order to function) OpenSource: Section 1(the location of the cities) You could take a look at the Cultural Vectors from Natural Earth; OR You could look into using ...


2

I am hoping these functions would be readily available in a spatial db like PostGis. First, am I right in assuming this? You're asking if PostGIS can find points within a certain distance of a given point? Yes, it can. I am going to use this data to build something important so I want to know if someone here uses something more accurate or concise. ...


1

Ooo, time to pull out the data science, baby. I'll use Texas A&M and Mapquest as examples but you can use whatever you want... Basically, assuming you have clean data, we have to look at a couple things. 1) Can you find a pattern? (Say the difference between Texas A&M and Mapquest is usually around 2 miles. Look up Exploratory Data Analysis) 2) ...


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If you have access to ArcMap 10.2.1+, you can use Add Geometry Attributes, which allows you to specify a coordinate system. spatref = arcpy.SpatialReference(4326) #WGS 84 arcpy.AddGeometryAttributes_management(FC, "POINT_X_Y_Z_M", "FEET_US", "ACRES", spatref) It's a script, not a tool, which means that you can inspect the code behind it to see what it ...


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you just need to run a cursor on it and use the projectAs() geometry method. import arcpy fc = r'C:\path_to\your_data\points.shp' wgs = arcpy.SpatialReference(4326) with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor(fc, ['SHAPE@', 'lat_field', 'long_field']) as rows: for row in rows: pnt_wgs = row[0].projectAs(wgs) row[1:] = [pnt_wgs.centroid.Y, ...


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This is simple technique you should use com.esri.core.geometry.Point class for converting your GPS lat and lng into ArcGIS map point. For Example: private Point ConvertMyLocationPoint(final double x, final double y) { Point wgspoint = new Point(x, y); Point mapPoint = (Point) GeometryEngine.project(wgspoint, SpatialReference.create(4326), ...


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Yes, Geocoding is only about streets. Its question, are complet data in Google Maps? Completness of data in OSM depends on world area of interest. It is also possible to try Bing REST API. I dont now details.


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OpenStreetMaps has an API called nominatim. If you like you can access it via a python library called geopy. You can pass a POI in the query. Take a look at this list for available POIs: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Nominatim/Special_Phrases/EN


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Geocoding API from mapbox Geocoding Mapbox for address or Nominatim


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What GIS are you using? If it's ArcGIS, try the Minimum Bounding Geometry tool. Can you give us more info? It would help a lot.


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This is quick and dirty. Most of this was adapted from the following website: http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html I haven't tested this too much but it seemed to work after initial testing. It will return a list of lat, long coordinate pairs along a line at a specified interval. I wrote it in python since I don't know php very well. from ...


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I managed to solve the problem by converting all of the coordinates to contain in the formula to SWEREF99TM before I calculated the closest point. Then, I converted the closest point found with the formula, back to WGS84. I used SWEREF99TM because it is a grid system, so the formula will work correctly. Note that this will probably not work outside of ...



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