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The lat/lon-Values 7486473 / 4193332 are pretty sure EPSG 3857 values which you need if you want to display your data on top of 3rd-party Background-Layers like Google or OSM. Your other values 55.7500 / 37.6167 are in EPSG 4326. so they need to be reprojected to get their EPSG3857-Values. You can transform them as @Joys mentioned or copy them from the map ...


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you can use something like this: var newlonLat = new OpenLayers.LonLat(lon, lat).transform(map.getProjectionObject() , new OpenLayers.Projection("EPSG:4326")); .transform( From projection, To projection) But first you need to know what projection you want, in the example is EPSG:4326 References: Openlayers DOC Kind regards!


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It looks like the standard term for this is an "unprojected map". There's an example here: http://www.colorado.edu/geography/gcraft/notes/mapproj/gif/unproj.gif


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Have a look at this tutorial. It may be able to help you out. Also, depending on how you are getting the data, you may have built in ways to convert it. For instance, if you're reading the NMEA stream via something like a Trimble SDK, they usually have converters in there. I also remember that if you're using a .NET program, there were numerous ...


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You can simply add proj4js support to your project and define the projection with the information from the spatialreference page. I put your shape file into QGIS. Exported the lot to geoJson in the native projection (EPSG:2950). Add the proj4s library and define the projection like so. proj4.defs('EPSG:2950', '+proj=tmerc +lat_0=0 +lon_0=-73.5 +k=0.9999 ...


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The answers here are good. I thought I would add to the answer by relating how the digits in longitude are affected by latitude. The charts given above can have the longitude adjusted by multiplying the value in the table by Cos(latitude)


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Make sure the file in qgis "lines up" with reality (check with openlayers plugin wether it matches with bing maps) Select your layer in qgis and in the "layer"-menu, go to "save as" and define wich CRS you want to convert the data to. You can even define what datatype you want your data in.


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Projection file looks like EPSG 2950: http://spatialreference.org/ref/epsg/2950/


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You need to define exactly what you mean by "move due east"! If you follow a rhumb line (aka a loxodrome) you will always be travelling east be following a parallel of latitude not be going in a straight line (ie, not the shortest path) stay at the same latitude If you follow a great circle (aka a geodesic or orthodrome), one that is initially heading ...


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Per Bill Huber's (whuber) clever workaround: xmap = (FlowAccumulation(1) + 0.5)*cellsize + xmin ymap = (FlowAccumulation(64) + 0.5)*cellsize + ymin Curtis Price has developed a python script to do this: from arcpy.sa import * from arcpy import env as E # Calculate $$NROWS and $$NCOLS from current environment cellSize = float(E.cellSize) ...



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