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0

The projection looks like it matches this custom entry in http://spatialreference.org: PROJCS["Stereographic_North_Pole", GEOGCS["GCS_Coordinate System imported from GRIB file", DATUM["D_unknown", SPHEROID["Sphere",6371229,0]], PRIMEM["Greenwich",0], UNIT["Degree",0.017453292519943295]], ...


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There are three distinct steps here, 1st make the point (which you seem to be able to do), 2nd add it to a layer with a style, 3rd add that to the map. This does the first 2 steps: static Layer addPoint(double latitude, double longitude) { SimpleFeatureTypeBuilder b = new SimpleFeatureTypeBuilder(); b.setName("MyFeatureType"); ...


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Just as a quick double check, when you rotated the coordinates, you did "rotate from the center", correct? In other words, your resulting coordinates were: {x Cos[angle] + (2 cy - y) Sin[angle], y Cos[angle] + x Sin[angle]} where cy is the center y coordinate (ie, half the y width, or 3080 in your case), and angle is the angle of rotation, correct? When I ...


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WGS 84 and ETRS 89 are two geographic coordinate systems (Lat/long). With those coordinate system, you will measure distances on the surface of the ellipsoid. WGS84 and ETRS 89 use almost identical spheroid (see below), so in most cases you will not see any difference between the 2. You are projecting your data in Universal Transverse Mercator zone 35 ...


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When you read the CSV file into a Qgis layer, you can iterate over the features and apply some processing like this: # path to CSV file filename = 'e:/gps2geometry.csv' # connection string for CSV file reader, \t: separated by tabs uri = 'file:///%s?crs=%s&delimiter=%s&xField=%s&yField=%s&decimal=%s' % (filename, 'EPSG:4326', '\t', 'X', ...


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The error is no doubt because the earth radius in your formula is not exactly the same as that used by ArcGIS. In fact, seeing as the earth is not a perfect sphere, the radius is different at the equator as it is at the poles. Probably ArcGIS corrects for that. However: in the Haversine Python script, it has: Base = 6371 * c If you calculate the ...


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You can copy the gps data to an excel-file (or any othe similar program). It will look samething like this: ID A B 1 Lat Long 2 50.123 7.123 3 50.321 7.321 If it only contains the lat/long in one column ("51.123N7.123E") you have to devide that value to two columns. Than you insert a new column C with the header "wkt" (=well known text) and in ...


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Using Google Earth Pro (this is free now) Use the Measure Tool (ruler) Draw around your rooftop building as polygon save >Polygon Measure goes to the 'Temporary Places' in the Left Table Right Click 'copy' (ctrl +v) Using Notepad++ Paste as XML Coordinates are found in Polygon Tag as LinearRing Coordinates


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In Google Earth, the yellow thumbtack tool is your 'placemark' tool you'll notice that when you click on that tool you get a yellow placemark icon in your window with an active boundary border around it. You can click the active placemark and drag it to where your building is, you will notice that as you do so, the recorded coordinates for your placemark ...


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Assuming your coordinates are in decimal degrees (see the answer of HeyOverThere), you just have to export your Excel file as a CSV and import the CSV following this tutorial. You may need to reproject your layer depending on its original datum.


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If the coordinates are in degrees, minutes, and seconds you'll need to convert those values to decimal. Here's a quick guide on how to do that: http://mathforum.org/sarah/hamilton/ham.degrees.html



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