New answers tagged

2

+axis=neu does in fact work, I had an error in the datum I was using. To clarify; if bringing in WKT that is in the format y,x for whatever reason, using a custom CRS with the axes swapped seems to work.


0

I ran into a similar issue today-- I needed to load each tile into a separate canvas element, then operate on each to pixel of each tile to transform the image. Using L.tileLayer.canvas and this example from John Gravois I was able to grab each tile, access the pixels, and then invert the colors (inversion code from this Mozilla Developer Network help ...


1

Besides what everyone else said, a Point data type works as a constraint. You can't insert lines in a field that's been defined as Point data type. But technically you can add lines, polygons and points in a field that's been defined as Geometry. If you are sure your table has only points I would use Point data type, but just for the sake of concise ...


4

POINT is type of GEOMETRY though there is also a native POINT datatype in Postgres (Which as the name implies only deals with point features), I have mostly used Point as a geometry type in PostGIS. There is also a data type of geography in PostGIS but it is limited to only geographic coordinate systems (According to the documentation it is restricted to ...


1

I've tried this approach. It's a fast way to do this, compared to the usual way, but it has limitations. The usual way The traditional way to do this is a spatial join. You read off the county name attribute of the first polygon you find which the point overlaps. The quickest way is to import these polygons into Postgres with shp2pgsql and do something ...


20

The coordinates are in MGRS (Military Grid Reference System) which is a projected coordinate system. Those coordinates give you an accuracy of 0.1 meters since there are 10 trailing digits. You can batch convert the coordinates in online websites like this The first 3 charcters are the "grid zone desiganation" : 38R the next two characters are the ...


1

This is giving you the lat/long for your geometry, but it looks like your data is in some sort of feet-based projection like state plane. If you're wanting to display the coordinates in a system that's readable by Google Maps, you'll need to transform the point. Not sure about the syntax for SDE in Oracle, but in PostGIS it's something similar to: ...


0

I was looking for this function too, and I have found it in some of the examples on their site. You can use ol.proj.fromLonLat([19.062072, 47.473478]). http://openlayers.org/en/v3.13.1/apidoc/ol.proj.html#.fromLonLat


5

I think these are Northern Irish postcodes. Confirm this by checking the code of those in the sea. There's probably also other NI postcodes overlapping England and Wales, and wrongly located. Do you have Belfast (BT) postcodes? If you are using OS CodePoint data, then there's a country code field. Any locations coded as Northern Ireland have coordinates in ...


2

I discovered that the complexity of installing own instance of Nominatim can be mitigated by using a docker container where the set up script is already prepared. I used a docker script available at https://github.com/helvalius/nominatim-docker. Then the installation is just the following: git clone https://github.com/helvalius/nominatim-docker.git cd ...


2

If you want to stick to OSM then you will need Nominatim to process it, or one of the other OSM geocoders. Address data in OSM is build up hierarchically. Just analyzing the raw data won't help, you have to build up an address hierarchy. This is what OSM geocoders usually do. Or take a look at alternative Nominatim instances / third-party providers.



Top 50 recent answers are included