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what is the distance in km of 30 latitude north? what is the distance in km of 30 latitude south?


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You want to find the three intersection points of three pairs of great circles given a point and a bearing. Formulae for great circle intersections are given here: http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html There's a javascript widget there for testing, and code which you will have to convert to your unstated programming language of choice. There'...


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If you aren't too concerned with a precise location, this is pretty close to the SW corner of the highlighted part of the image you provided: 33.061973, -117.202343 This was found by google map search for "Fortuna Ranch Rd, Encinitas" and then zoom into the property location. I chose the SW corner because of the fence line crossing is a little more ...


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In the python code, replace in the function getDestinationLatLong d = distance/1000 with d = float(distance)/1000 Or d will be rounded ....


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I don't believe you can calculate a position from these values. These look to be bearings and distances - a direction around a circle from a known location. The known location could be anywhere in the world, and the boundary lines are drawn in the direction and distance listed from that known location. These are used to create lot boundaries. Basically ...


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I take it that looks like standard latitude and longitude, in degrees - minutes - seconds (N87 degrees, 40 minutes and 20 seconds). Apparently this can be converted to decimal using the following: Decimal Degrees = Degrees + minutes/60 + seconds/3600 Though I'm unsure if this is correct in your particular case (and also because I haven't done that in a ...


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You can use the srsName= string to get the polyline from the WFS in lat/lon coordinates from the start. Alternatively, provided that you've read the coordinate strings into Python as arrays x and y, you can do import pyproj prj = pyproj.Proj(PROJ4_STRING) lon, lat = prj(x, y, inverse=True) where PROJ4_STRING is the libproj SRS string for the original ...


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There are a few questions I had about your code. Opening the files in 'rb' mode means to read it as a binary. Is this what you meant? I find your indexing a bit confusing. Your lines converting to float are mapping every item from an index on. That means that map(float, row1[16:]) converts every item from 16 to the end, map(float, row1[17:]) converts every ...


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I don't have enough reputation to post this as a comment, but since nobody else has contributed yet, I'll just put this here. Are you sure you are passing your lat/longs as numbers and not strings? Maybe try something like this just to make sure: print haversine(float(floats1[1]),float(floats1[0]),float(floats3[1]),float(floats4[0])) Also, is there a ...


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If you know for certain that your input longitudes range between 0 and 360, then yes: just subtract 360 from values that are greater than (or equal to) 180. If there is any possibility of "crazy" values (less than -180 or greater than 540) you might consider using the IEEE_REM function: fixed_longitude = IEEE_REM(longitude, 360.0) This will gracefully ...


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Here is an example for fortran: Variables in explanation: long1 is the longitude varying from -180 to 180 or 180W-180E long3 is the longitude variable from 0 to 360 (all positive) To convert longitude from (0-360) to (-180 to 180) Matlab and fortran long1=mod((long3+180),360)-180 Matlab long1=rem((long3+180),360)-180 Fortran long1=modulo((...


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If you are trying to match the LAMGe definition from the Koordinatentransformation 4.4 online tool, you have to have all the projection parameters. A quick look on the online tool's source website and I was able to find the metadata for the supported coordinate reference systems. Note: The link goes to the English version of the webpage. LAMGe, EPSG::4839 ...


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The origin with coordinates λ0 and Φ0 (longitude and latitude) should be roughly in the center of your study area. West of Greenwich has negative longitudes. The parallels Φ1 and Φ2 should be taken so that your study area is mainly between them, because the distortion increases outside of them. If your study area is stretched mainly North-South, a ...


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For the transform, you need to turn the 1D arrays on Lon, lat into a 2D grid: lon_grid, lat_grid = numpy.meshgrid(lons, lats)


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I'd try to use a desktop software like a spreadsheet LibreOffice Calc or Microsoft Excel to process your data but if you really want to go the SQL way, this query parses a table with a field like yours and returns back a geometry. You will need a bit more of tuning for your use case but generally speaking this should work: WITH data as (SELECT ...


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As I mentioned in the comments, you probably just need to reproject the geometries with ST_Transform, using something like this: SELECT x, y, val, ST_AsLatLonText(ST_Transform(ST_SetSRID(geom, 27700), 4326)) FROM ( SELECT (ST_PixelAsCentroids(rast, 1, true)).* FROM testraster WHERE rid = 1 ) foo; But do you really want 8083 * 12952 = 104691016 or 105 ...


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You have ~800 km east to west and ~1300 km north to south. This sounds like a perfect bounding box for the UK particularly if you include the islands to the north and south. Anything but meters (say feet, km, degrees) would be unreasonable. It is a so-so fit for Germany but could work. I think we have our linear units (m) but what system? Five digits, both ...


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GR refers to the Grid Reference, it's like a lat long intersection. Eastings are grid lines that akin to longitude(lines that increase towards the East) and Northings are like latitude (lines that increase towards the North). The intersection of the two is known as the GR or grid reference.



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