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0

It should be the problem that @Jake mentioned. When adding a CSV layer you are creating a temporary layer which do not alter the default on-the-fly CRS (i.e. WGS-84). When adding the shapefile with a different CRS, you do however alter the on-the-fly CRS to NAD1983, which shift and/or distort your original temporary data. Two things you may do: Export ...


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Degrees are part of a modified Sexagesimal (base 60) number system. Even though there are 360 degrees in a circle, 360 is 6 x 60. The origin of degrees as angular units is unclear (see wiki/Degree_(angle)#History.) See Coordinate Conversion: Decimal Degree to Deg-Min-Sec of lat/long Coordinates for subdivisions of a degree. In terms of fundamental ...


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So i found the answer and i decided to shere it. Apparently R0 , A1 , A2 has only one value and they are the radialdist_A1 , radialdist_A2 and distortion_R0 in the code. I also discovered that i needed only to convert the (lat,lon) to utm zone 32. And then everthing works!


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I think you would have to go by the directions that the latitude or longitude values are increasing. As long as the coordinate reference system being used is a easting, northing one, latitude values will increase upwards, in the map/page sense, in the northern hemisphere and downwards in the southern hemisphere. Similarly, longitude values will increase to ...


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It doesn't matter at what longitude you are. What matters is what latitude you are. Length of 1 degree of Longitude = cosine (latitude in decimal degrees) * length of degree (miles) at equator. Convert your latitude into decimal degrees ~ 37.26383 1 degree of Longitude = ~0.79863 * 69.172 = ~ 55.2428 miles More useful information from the about.com ...


1

One way to accomplish this is to create a new table with the same data and this time let cartodb geocode you lat/lng with the endpoints. Then you have to create a visualization (if you not already created one). Now you can make a line for two points with ST_MakeLine Should look like this: SELECT ST_MakeLine( the_geom_webmercator, (SELECT ...


3

Are you sure the Shapefile contains points? Shape_Leng is a common attribute for lines. That could be the reason why you can't export X and Y coordinates from your Shapefile. In that case the new question would be how to extract points from those lines. For that, you could go to Processing->ToolBox->QGIS geoalgorithms->Vector geometry ...


2

You first need to establish what coordinate system the file sent to you is in. The presence of a .prj file indicates it does have one. If it isn't GCS WGS84, you'll need to reproject it to that (or an alternative geographic coordinate system [GCS] if another better suites your requirements). In QGIS you can do this by right-clicking the layer and choosing ...


6

The point at (0°, 0°) is not generally given a name All geographers, cartographers and surveyors ought to know the following, but I reference some sources anyway: According to Matt Rosenberg The point at which the equator (0° latitude) and the prime meridian (0° longitude) intersect has no real significance but it is in the Gulf of Guinea in the ...


4

Yes, you still reference coordinates (0, 0) as the origin in respect to the coordinate system as a whole. In essence, coordinate systems are grids in themselves. Therefore, terminology between the two are shared. See how ArcGIS refers to the "Grid" location as the origin.


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It's "there where all the data shows up when something goes wrong". At least that's how I call it, or how I often detect when something went wrong. Others would call it Null Island, which is often used in a humorous way. For an occasional good laugh I would recommend some of the Null Island accounts on Twitter, such as Null Island Gang, Maptime Null Island, ...



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