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0

I agree with Micky T, it looks like you are using the wrong proj4 string. First, you will need to ensure which projection your numbers are in. WGS84 is the datum, not the projection. One possible projection is UTM, which defines your starting point for your easting and northing in meters. The x and y values that you give sure look like they are a ...


1

Your data is in LAT/LON (WGS84) but the X and Y columns are in a projected coordinate system, likely something like UTM or State Plane. So all you have to do is create 2 new columns for the Lat and Lon, and populate them like this: How do I calculate the latitude and longitude of points using QGIS?


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One solution (and a great chance to implement itertools) would be: import arcpy, os, itertools infc = r"C:\MyFolder\MyGDB\MyInputFeatureClass" # Replace with the path to your input feature class outfc = r"C:\MyFolder\MyGDB\MyOutputFeatureClass" # Replace with the path to your output feature class spatialref = arcpy.Describe(infc).spatialReference if not ...


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Have a look at "Extreme points of Canadian provinces" from Wikipedia.


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I was able to figure it out with a work around. I added the Lat/Long Fields and then us Convert Coordinate Notation. That generated a new feature class with two new fields: DDLat and DDLon. That got me what I needed even though I had to add a couple additional steps. The output was 076.###W, 37.####N as opposed to what I wanted which was (-76.###, 37.####) ...


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I think another way of doing this is to just add the text file to ArcMap, display by x,y coordinates, and join to your to your original shapefile. You can then export the resulting shapefile (or just the table) as whatever you want.


3

This is a reasonably simple problem to solve in ArcGIS. Open the Shapefile (it's not a "raster shapefile" btw; there's no such thin). Add two fields to your shapefile. One for Lat, one for Lon. Both should be of type Float or double. Populate one of these fields with the X, and one with the Y value for the point. (Using "calculate geometry"). Now, create ...


4

As stated in the tool documentation for Calculate Field: Python expressions can use the geometry area and length properties with an areal or linear unit to convert the value to a different unit of measure (for example, !shape.length@kilometers!) These expressions are not usable with points or individual coordinates. Fortunately, you can use other ...


0

If you have some unique ID in both layers which you can use to easily join values to new layer from old one, it is piece of cake. But this doesn't seem like that case. If not, it is pretty difficult problem. I wonder why comment from user30184 suggesting to use OpenJUMP and plugin http://www.vividsolutions.com/products.asp?catg=spaapp&code=roadmatcher ...


0

You can use Open Street Map Nominatim API for Geocoding and it will return the bounding box Example: Manitoba, Canada http://nominatim.openstreetmap.org/search?q=Manitoba,%20Canada&format=xml&polygon=1 Response (xml) boundingbox="49.9971285,49.9972285,-96.8892673,-96.8891673" ...


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You can download Country Boundaries from Natural Earth: http://www.naturalearthdata.com/http//www.naturalearthdata.com/download/110m/cultural/ne_110m_admin_0_countries.zip Found here: http://www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/110m-cultural-vectors/


5

This is a great question, I had to do something similar recently but with a much smaller dataset, so I was able to use a simple intersection with some extra visual quality checking and it was fine. But here's an idea for this, though I don't have code, and it's kind of a hefty process. Definitely test with a sample from the full dataset first. You can ...


1

I much prefer the answer from @dmh126 as his method allows your red_line layer to be updated quite easily. Just to add an alternative, you can use the Join attributes table tool from the Processing Toolbox and select your layers with the common field. Note that this method creates a new shapefile instead of updating an existing one:


2

If you want to add some attributes from red layer to blue layer and one attribute is common in both layers, you have to use Add Vector Join. I've written about that here. Right click on your red shapefile layer on Layer Panel and choose Properties. Then go to Joins tab. Press the + button, it will create new join. Join layer is your red shapefile layer. ...


3

You are correct. A geohash rectangle of precision N characters will always be fully contained by the corresponding geohash of size N - 1 containing all the same preceding characters.


3

180 degrees of latitude = 7200 0.025° sections from pole to pole 360 degrees of longitude = 14400 0.025° sections along the equator 7200 * 14400 = 1.0368 * 10^8 0.025°x0.025° squares (not actually squares)


3

Disclaimer: Any method you use to do this, especially with a consumer GPS unit, is going to be an approximation at best. If you truly want to know where the boundaries are, you will need to locate property pins/corners which might require a metal detector. Your best, safest option is to hire a professional land surveyor. No, those are not lat/longs in the ...


0

First add your coordinate data to ArcMap. You can use Add XY Data or as faith_dur suggested in a comment the Make XY Event Layer tool. Be sure to specify the coordinate system as TM65 with either tool to correctly define the coordinate values of the points. Depending on how you create them you may need to save the result to a feature class or shapefile for ...


2

Maybe you mixed lat (y) and lon (x)? For London: Latitude (y) : 51.5085300 Longitude (x): -0.1257400



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