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In this situation, I would use the "Change Layout" tool on the Layout Toolbar. Open the MXD that contains the data frame you want to use and then use the "Change Layout" tool. In the tool, choose the MXD that contains the layout, scale bar, etc. that you want to use as your template and click Finish. This will insert the data frame you want onto the map ...


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I was able to copy the scale bar I wanted to use, activate the data frame I needed it for, then paste. The new one retains all the formatting of the old. You can then set aside or delete the old one.


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I forgot that I had grouped my data frame, north arrow etc. on the zoomed in data frames before trying to add the extent indicator to the overview map. Once I un-grouped I was able to add the extent indicator and the then group everything back together.


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I generally agree with both of the other answers but just wanted to add this answer to discuss what things you can edit with the legend as a graphic. First off to edit individual items like change one of the field titles or delete an element right click the legend you converted to graphic and select "Ungroup": You can ungroup elements further by selecting ...


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Best practice is to get your legend as close to what you want as possible before converting. Start off by giving the layers more readable names -- for example, change the layer name from "InterwarProstitues$Events" to "Prostitutes". Set the symbology how you want it. (This should definitely be done in the layers rather than in the legend, to ensure your ...


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I don't know what you've read, but if you convert your legend to a graphic you can only edit graphic properties. It's no longer a legend object. ESRI help on converting map elements to graphics (bottom of page). Edit: First, you have to do this in a new legend. You can't edit a graphic in the way you're thinking. Anyway, there are two methods. One, in the ...


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If you have added the labels inside of your data frame, you can turn them on and off. Here are a few ways to know if your labels are inside or outside of your data frame. If you are in Data View and you can see the labels, they are inside of your data frame. If you are in Layout View, first notice if you are working inside or outside of your data frame. ...


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Do not rotate the Data Frame. Try instead to change the 'Central Meridian' of your selected projection (right-click in the Data Frame and select properties. Switch to Projection tab and double-click the selected projection).


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You should be able to handle most of what you are doing by using the scale dependencies for a layer. so, map 1 is at 1:5,000 and map 2 is at 1:50,000 you can then change the sybology in whatever order or have them all visible and one map would not influence the other. Essentially using the grouping technique but based on scale rather than map frame.


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You should name your elements in the map so that they can be referenced by the element.name property. See the text element docs for elm in arcpy.mapping.ListLayoutElements(thisMap, "TEXT_ELEMENT"): if elm.name == 'TestName' #reference by named element here elm.text = str(row[1]) #do work here


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This is certainly very possible to do using ArcPy, but it is a multi-step process, and one that I think you should take on in bite-size chunks. You already have a layout with four data frames so I think the next steps are to learn how to reference each of those data frames - I would use arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames how to add a dataset of your choice to ...



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