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Since the version 2.x, PyQGIS has an has an interpolate function similar to that of Shapely : for distance in xrange(0,lenght_line,20): point = line.interpolate(distance)


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You can use the Dissolve tool from QGIS: Vector > Geoprocessing Tools > Dissolve


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Given the nature of the lines you're trying to create versus the geometry you have, I think it will probably be fastest/simpler to just create new features as in the tutorial you have linked to. Any method that actually converts the polygons to lines will involve splitting the lines at certain points and/or deleting a lot of extra nodes/lines/etc. There is ...


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Use the polygon to lines tool and then remove those parts of the line layer which you don't want to keep.


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You could use the Distance to nearest hub algorithm from the Processing plugin which you could add your points and your lines layer instead of going through a query. From a couple of example layers that I have, you can get something like this: Then when you open up the Attributes Table for the output layer, you will be given the HubName and HubDist in ...


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I seems very similar to post "postgis, extrapolate a line". If I avoid repetition of cited post, I think you just need to extrapolate beyond your extreme points. In a query you get something like this should work: SELECT ST_MakeLine(ST_TRANSLATE(a, sin(az1) * len, cos(az1) * len),ST_TRANSLATE(b,sin(az2) * len, cos(az2) * len)) FROM ( SELECT a, b, ...


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As @user30184 has stated you have performed an update on your RDBMS data without wrapping it in a transaction. Unfortunately there is no way to recover the data without resorting to a backup (unless you have an audit table, which are not as commonly used as they should be). To recover your data you will have to restore from a backup. In the future, utilize ...



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