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19

The Answer was on James Fee's Blog from your question there. "For Linux: only ArcGIS Server, the ArcGIS Engine Runtime, and ArcReader, but not (likely ever) ArcGIS Desktop. As for Desktop: why in the world would you even want to install that collection of buggy 32-bit COM objects on a nice, clean 64-bit Linux box If you want a Linux desktop with GIS, then ...


17

Build from source, with Python bindings: sudo apt-get install build-essential python-all-dev wget http://download.osgeo.org/gdal/gdal-1.9.0.tar.gz tar xvfz gdal-1.9.0.tar.gz cd gdal-1.9.0 ./configure --with-python make sudo make install In addition, some Linux distributions require the shared library cache to be updated after install: sudo ldconfig ...


11

With ogr2ogr, you can specify a bounding box that you'd like to clip by with -clipsrc x_min y_min x_max y_max, so for example, to only get the northern hemisphere of a global dataset you could do: ogr2ogr -f "ESRI Shapefile" borders_north.shp borders.shp -clipsrc -180 0 180 90 See the ogr2ogr documentation for further options, including clipping to ...


10

Not that I know of. It does however run just fine using VirtualBox to emulate the OS itself, I've had no problems using ArcGIS in this configuration.


9

Here's a dedicated page for OSM SVG exporting: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/SVG One way to do this through command line would be to use Maperitive - here's a tutorial on how to generate SVG. You can simply write all the commands mentioned in the tutorial into a text file and run Maperitive with the file specified in the command line. Here are some ...


8

Basically pick a computer as a server, install the OS and database software, open the firewall for port 5432, modify the postgresql.conf and pg_hba.conf files to allow external access, and serve the data to the other computers. These are the same instructions for setting up a server on either Windows or Linux, except one OS is free. Most folks would pick ...


7

Check out Shapelib. It's a small C library for simple shapefile manipulation.


6

I can't make any claims about 'smallest' but a couple options are: PySAL: Python Statistical Analysis Library. It can read shapefiles natively. You could include only the modules you need. SpatiaLite: Store your data in a spatially-enabled SQLite database. SpatiaLite includes a feature called 'virtual shapefile' that allows you to directly access a ...


6

CentOS will work if you stick with a version that corresponds to one of the supported versions of RHEL but I doubt you'll have much luck with Ubuntu.


6

You have a few options: PostGIS 2 has support for TIN and some other 3D objects. GRASS has support via an add-on. See this how-to document. QGIS has an Interpolation plugin (see here) Roll-your-own by importing the GDAL libraries into a 3D modelling package such as Blender (I do it this way a lot because I want interactive 3D model rather than for ...


6

Blender has a Python API. Therefore, I use Python in Blender and import the GDAL libraries and construct a Blender-native mesh directly from the GIS data. The only thing you need to be careful of is that the version of GDAL you have matches the version of Python in the Blender release you are using. EDIT Plugins: If you don't want to write your own script ...


5

I have it on a verbal authority from ESRI that they were looking at Ubuntu during the ArcGIS 10 Beta. so based on this it is in the pipeline but how far they have gotten I could only speculate


5

What about using the OSGeo Live distribution? OSGeo-Live is a self-contained bootable DVD, USB thumb drive or Virtual Machine based on Xubuntu, that allows you to try a wide variety of open source geospatial software without installing anything. It is composed entirely of free software, allowing it to be freely distributed, duplicated and passed ...


5

You open your package manager. Type grass. Hit the install button. It should be able to identify any dependencies you may not have and install those as well. A package manager usually comes with a Linux installation. Some are better than others. I like synaptic.


5

It appears that mint is able to handle package installation via a web embeddable trigger. Navigate to community.linuxmint.com/software/view/grass and click install. Looks like Mint manages everything from there.


5

Ok, although it is funny to answer my own question I think it might be useful also for other QGIS users. If you go to Muon Package Manager and in Software sources remove all QGIS related repositories like Ubuntugis etc. then you add these (obtained from QGIS website): deb http://qgis.org/debian-nightly raring main deb-src http://qgis.org/debian-nightly ...


4

You can install and use qgis to load the file you downloaded; use the mouse or query the data for the features that you would like to select; and export the selected features to a new shapefile. QGIS is a cross-platform (Linux, Windows, Mac) open source application with many common GIS features and functions. A link containing tutorials that illustrates ...


4

It's a problem with postgresql. You can solve it by editing pg_hba.conf with sudo nano /etc/postgresql/8.x/main/pg_hba.conf where 8.x depend of your postgresql version (8.4 on Lucid Lynx) You change in the column METHOD of the file the word ident by trust and save the file. After you do a sudo /etc/init.d/postgresql-8.x restart Your pgrouting command ...


4

A Perl script called Geo-OSM-Tiles-0.02 might just do the job. From the module's description: This script downloads all map tiles from an OpenStreetMap tile server for some geographic region in a range of zoom levels. The PNG images of the tiles are stored in a directory tree that mirrors the paths from the server. A bounding box of geographic ...


4

It's hard, but not impossible, to hide a password, even from root. The trick is to save the password in a password protected keyring (like the Gnome Keyring), unlock the Keyring once and then (from the same session!) run a script like the following (written in python). Please note that even if root can su to your account he still cannot open the Keyring ...


4

I wrote up my experiences at http://ian01.geog.psu.edu/geoserver_docs/ which should answer most of your questions. The key step is installing Oracle's Java instead of OpenJDK.


4

A really good guide to setup connecting to a postgres database on another machine (which could be remote) is at http://library.linode.com/databases/postgresql/pgadmin-windows. I won't repeat it here, as that guide covers it well. The advantage of this is everything transferred between the two machines is encrypted, and you don't need to give any other IP ...


4

You have to set up the database in the form osm2pgsql expects it. I have written a detailed Howto here (you might use google to translate): http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Ajoessen/Postgis


4

I've not used Sabayon before, but assuming it is the same as with Gentoo: You need to enable some additional USE flags for GRASS and QGIS. In /etc/portage/package.use add the following: sci-geosciences/qgis python grass sci-geosciences/grass python Then recompile using the new USE flags: emerge --newuse sci-geosciences/qgis sci-geosciences/grass


4

How to compile latest QuantumGIS on a non-Debian/Ubuntu Linux-system with Python-plugin-support and GRASS-integration? I finally did it! Download and prepare dependencies. Most of them I could find in repositories, sometimes package names vary. Dependencies from INSTALL read-me file: CMake >= 2.6.2 Flex Bison >= 2.4 Qt >= 4.4.0 Proj >= 4.4.x GEOS >= 3.0 ...


4

Package management in Mint Linux is based on apt: http://wiki.debian.org/Apt, which means that the following, typed into your terminal, should install GRASS: sudo apt-get install grass Once the package is installed, you should be able to launch it by typing grass into your terminal. This will get you the latest stable version of GRASS. If you want ...


4

ArcGIS Desktop does not require a high end graphics card. It can run with a low end Graphics card or even without one. What it requires is hardware graphics acceleration to draw all the gradients and shading as well as dynamic display. Have a look at the hardware requirements of Arcgis Desktop? 64 MB RAM minimum, 256 MB RAM or higher recommended. ...


4

To solve the rendering-issues in VirtualBox you need to disable 3D-Hardware- and 2D-Video-Acceleration. This is quite paradox, but I asked friends who used ArcGIS in a VirtualBox session and they simply told me I should try to turn off the acceleration. It works.


4

Geonetwork's default configuration tries to put H2 database files directly in /var/lib/tomcat7, which is not writable by the tomcat user. You need to change this to a location that is writable, and that is persistent (won't get overwritten by a redeployment). A simple solution for this is using the tomcat user's home directory. First, make sure your tomcat ...


4

I think the best option if you want to work with several GIS applications and a Ubuntu-based system is the UbuntuGIS repository. Adding it to your sources is very easy, just enter this commands in the terminal, one at a time. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntugis/ubuntugis-unstable sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install qgis After that you will have ...



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