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The where condition you are looking for is: points.Obj Within polygon.Obj AND polygon.income > 1500 You can also solve the problem by using a sub select query instead of a join query. Here is how to fill in the details in the SQL Select dialog: Select: * From: POINTS Where: OBJ Within Any (Select OBJ From POLYGON Where INCOME > 1500) Or in a ...


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There is a new tool available, too. Well new in the Pitney Bowes product range. The tool is called MapInfo RouteFinder. You can see a demo on how to creating catchment area like the ones above here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NZDK4R2ZWw. You can read a bit more about the product in this article from the MapInfo Journal: ...


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From you comment I can see that you want to hide part of the raster and not need to clip the raster file. Have a look at the Mask tool created by Egge-Jan Pollé. You can find the tool here on the Community Download site: http://communitydownloads.pbinsight.com/code-exchange/download/mask


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As mentioned in the edit to the question, defaults can be set here: Options > Preferences > Legend Window


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When you say you want to cut your raster with a vector layer, I assume you want to clip it? This is not possible in core MapInfo. You will need an extension such as Discover, Engage or Vertical Mapper. Not only can you clip, but you can save as different raster formats. However, there are several free solutions that will do this for you, the most popular ...


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MapInfo .TAB files are merely pointers to another data source - be it native .DAT or ECW or GeoTiff or Excel etc. What is the native format the grid is in? If it's a MIG or if you have the original data used to create the grid you can use the clip tool in the thematic map options: You can save out raster images by using the Save Window As option under the ...


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Yes, Pitney Bowes offers a similar product. It's called DriveTime (another link here) and it's an additional program which you can buy. It's not built into MapInfo, unfortunately. I've always had Pitney Bowes run the drive times for me. I've never been terribly impressed with the results, but they did the job. They were able to provide catchment ...


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You could use PostgreSQL/PostGIS. QGIS support is not in question. As for latest MapInfo v12.5 supported versions and ODBC drivers are: http://reference.mapinfo.com/software/mapinfo_pro/english/12.5/MapInfoProfessionalInstallGuide.pdf


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Postgis is surely a good idea for your task. You can use SQL queries to filter the data to a dataset you want. Another option is to use a spatialite database. The data will be stored in one single file, which makes it more portable (either for homework, different OS or backup reasons). Spatialite uses SQL queries in the same way.


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We, Pitney Bowes, basically do not know as we haven't tested the License Server Utility on that OS (Windows Server 2012 R2). On the other hand we aren't saying that it will not run on Windows Server 2012 R2. If that's the server software you have available, I would give it a try and see how it works. Not a direct answer, but that the best advice I can ...


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I asked internally here at Pitney Bowes and got this reply: You should be able to do it by copying the gsb file to MapInfo Pro folder end editing the NTv2.xml file. You will need to add this transformation to the NTv2.xml file: <NTv2Conversion> <Description>NTv2 for Switzerland from CH1903 to CH1903+</Description> ...


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http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/geocoder/ You have to use your own API-key but apart from that it works quite well. If you want set up your own service you can use gisgraphy http://www.gisgraphy.com


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If you've got QGIS, the MMQGIS plugin has a pretty cool Geocoding function where you can load a .CSV file and utilise Google and/or OSM (or even your own road/address data) to create some points and write them to a Shapefile. The quality of your Geocode would be dependent on the quality of your input data as well as the quality of Google and OSM ...


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I think you're effectively trying to create a bivariate thematic. To do this most easily in Mapinfo, as referenced in the MI Pro help under Bivariate Thematic Mapping: 1. Do one of the following: Create a thematic map. Choose Map > Create Thematic Map and select the Ranges type with a transparent style. Continue setting the options until you get to ...


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1) For one time solutions Google Fusion Tables may be usefull. You can upload excel, geocode there and then download different formats. 2) For DB solution check Tiger Geocoder for Postgis/postgresql


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Hmmm not easily! and not without MapBasic or a lot of work to the best of my knowledge. How many attribute types do you have? If there are only a few you could query each attribute, add the result to the map, and style the labels accordingly. Aside from that the only other way that I thought of would be to effectively do the same thing, but use MapBasic ...


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You could try creating a MapInfo Grid (.mig) by creating a grid thematic: Then select the grid option on the left at the bottom: Pick your table and the field which you want to use as your Z, also the location where you want to save your MIG : Play with the colours settings and interpolation method:


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The Spider graph tool might be able to help you here, but it would require a degree of manipulation to get right - which if you're proficient in photoshop you might be better off doing it in there, pending the complexity of the data. As a really rough guide, and shamelessly lifted from Pete over at MI-L: Keep your base data file, but create a 2nd file for ...



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