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8

You have some environnemntal data there, provided by le Muséum National d'Histoire Naturel. The data.gouv.fr portal just opened few days ago. IGN geoportal : http://www.geoportail.fr/ Some data from IGN are available for free. You will find many ressources regarding hydrology on that document (pdf) - see also http://www.eaufrance.fr. Regarding geology, BRGM ...


8

This is a known issue: http://support.esri.com/es/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/17336 Basically it's a problem with using a raster layer in the inset maps. If you can only use vectors on your insets the transparency works.


6

With EPSG:2227 NAD83 / California zone 3 (ft US) The result looks quiet good: EPSG:2872 and 3494 have the same proj definition. You can load the data as delimited text layer into QGIS, assign projection EPSG:2227 to it, and Rightclick -> Save As ... to WGS84 (EPSG:4326) under a different name. Just take care that usually x is positive East, and y is ...


6

Hand digitizing the paths in ArcMap 10 may be easier than walking around every path on campus with a GPS. A really quick and easy way to accomplish your task is as follows: Open ArcMap 10 Right click on a folder within the Catalog and select New > Shapefile Click your new shapefile and select feature type "polyline" Add a basemap (File > add data > add ...


6

We used SPreAD-GIS to model outdoor sound for our 500+ sq mi siren system build as detailed in this ArcNews article. I used SPreAD-GIS with some extensive modifications to allow it to do parallel processing and in_memory datasets (takes a long time to process 200 sirens over 500 sq mi otherwise). This requires Spatial Analyst and a version of ArcGIS that is ...


6

I think the Integrate tool from the Data Management toolbox should solve this - you can set a tolerance and it will align and remove any slivers from two polygons. ArcGIS Integrate tool help


5

I presume you intend to use a GPS (possibly on your iPhone) for this. Have a look at the excellent Open Street Map (OSM) project. There is a guide on how to do exactly this here: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Beginners_Guide_1.1. This should get you started.


5

These guys don't really tell you up front what you're getting. What's the difference between small, medium and large for example? No info. And really, what possible advantage is there of having a full-fledged desktop GIS app such as QGIS hosted online? Doesn't make any sense.


5

Yes, QGIS 2's print composer there is a tab called Atlas Generation, it is how you create map books.


5

You are misunderstanding what is being measured! This graph seems to look at what web mapping javascript APIs are used on web pages, and it makes sense that things like QGIS or Mapserver are not counted, because they are not javascript mapping libraries!


4

Also make sure the GPS receiver is set to the right UTM zone. Probably 14N unless you're very far east along the KS/NE line.


4

Esri's Runtime for WPF supports WMS layers. It is not free, but the ArcGIS Silverlight SDK is and has many of the same capabilities. So you may want to try the Silverlight SDK in Out-of-browser mode, which is similar to running a WPF app. You need to set up a proxy though.


4

Agree with @iant. You are paying for hosting. With the free ones, you have to download the installer yourself and provide your own machine. With the site you linked, they provide the server. The editions differ in the number of CPUs, RAM and backup storage available. You can view the differences by using their product comparison feature. As for charging ...


4

The Best is Sport Tracker (originally developed by Nokia) Will log GPS data like coordinates, altitude, colour codes the route with GPS accuracy/number of satellites (optional) Exports to GPX and KML (CSV and XML) Can view on the map or via Google Earth on Android (Ice Cream Sandwich - Android 4.0.3 works best) for this. Available on Google Play (App ...


4

OK- I figured out a fix for this. Susan Jones has a script http://arcscripts.esri.com/details.asp?dbid=16055 that works the way I was hoping the Bearing Distance to Line tool would work. The output from the script were lines radiating at varying angles and distances from my base coordinate (datum). Then I used Feature Vertices to Point to add an X,Y ...


4

OpenLayers directly read OpenStreetMap vector files (.osm format) and Leaflet can read it with plugin. Osm file contains all the points of the road in order.


4

OK, so the "Element Name" box appears to be the likely solution. This is non-intuitively placed in the "Size and Position" tab of the map layout element's properties dialog box.


4

The complexity of an online map is widely dependent on several things; first being what api/platform you want to use (CartoDB, ArcGIS Online, Google Maps, etc...). What API/platform is best to use will be at least partially dependent on several other factors though, such as what licensing restrictions you can work within (ex: most of Google's api's ...


3

If Lewis' answer is a bit brusk - here's what he meant: QGIS is a free GIS package it's available here - http://www.qgis.org/ Tiger Census boundaries are here: http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/tiger.html Depending on the accuracy of what you're up to I'd suggest using the Cartographic Boundary files product in the first instance as this has the ...


3

You might want to browse through cartophile blog for some inspiration.


3

There are a number of text formats to choose from. However, if it must be text based the ESRI ASCII grid format (.asc) may be a good choice because it dispenses with recording the X and Y (lon and lat) coordinates. It does this by assuming a regular grid whose dimensions are stored in the header. Only the raster value at the center or lower left corner ...


3

If you like to avoid the .OSM file, you can also use the Overpass API to get live data: http://www.overpass-api.de/open_layers_mashup.html


3

CartoDB (https://cartodb.com/ ) is quite good for this, or you can convert your vector to the KML format and open it in Google Earth.


3

It is finally a matter of taste but if I should use only one program I would select one of QGIS gvSIG (or gvSIG CE) Kosmo GIS uDig Map Window and OpenJUMP are also worth mentioning. They are more simple but with less features, especially OpenJUMP which suits best for certain vector processing.


3

You are providing html in setContent() var popup = L.popup(); function onMapClick(e) { popup .setLatLng(e.latlng) .setContent(e.latlng.toString() + '<a href="http://www.google.com">Visit Google</a>"') .openOn(map); } map.on('click', onMapClick);


2

Is writing your own app out of the question? Location information is exposed through the LocationManager: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/location/LocationManager.html And the data you are likely referring to are in the NMEA string: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/location/GpsStatus.NmeaListener.html


2

You may screen the websites listed there and also have a look at flowingdata. I love stamen maps:


2

in my opinion you should consider change database to PostGIS. If I were you, (I guess only opensource software is in your range?) I would base application on geoserver http://geoserver.org/ it is very good geospatial server with nice GUI. You can connect it to PostgreSQL (PostGIS exactly). When you have these two, you can upload directly from shapefile data ...


2

You might also be interested in weather station data for France. There is also great historical trend data on WeatherSpark.


2

Chiming in late, sorry. The short answer is: no, as you pointed out uDig doesn't support google tiles because it is not permitted by license. I know QGIS is doing it but I am quite sure they shouldn't. At least that position a few years back when we wanted to add it to uDig. We discussed it quite some time in the community and funny enough several of us ...



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