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16

Here you find the map including the legend. The legend is in German, but I am German, so I tried to translate it as precise as possible. I think (and please @Giancarlo correct me, if you disagree): 1 is "Reichsstraße, ausgebaut". That means a well-developed street. 2 is propably a sort of drainage system or stream (thank you @AndreJ). It is not named in ...


7

Here are some ideas. With base plot you can do plot(x, interpolate=TRUE) You can also resample your data y <- disaggregate(x, 5, method='bilinear') Or indeed smooth it using a focal operation y <- focal(x, w=matrix(1, 5, 5), mean) Or a combination y <- disaggregate(x, 5) y <- focal(y, w=matrix(1, 5, 5), mean) The question ...


6

German surveyors did everything according to rules. For the 1:100.000 Karte des deutschen Reiches, you can find it here: http://www.landkartenarchiv.de/deutschland_topographischekarte_1896_legende.php and http://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~215008~5501917:Legend-for-Karte-des-Deutschen-Reic #1 are major roads, no need for trees. ...


6

The answer is quite simple: "Spot heights – shown as a number beside a dot – appear at strategic points, including along roads where they level out at the top or foot of a hill. These can be a useful guide where there aren't many contour height numbers."


5

The examples in your link look like the coordinates have been transformed via a shear and a scale matrix. You can easily apply this to the coordinates you get from the usual fortify/join data that ggplot requires. Need a unique character ID value: oregon.tract$id=as.character(1:nrow(oregon.tract)) Fortify on that ID and join attribute data: ofort = ...


4

Your topomap is a SpatialLinesDataframe. geom_map is used for polygons. I suggest you use geom_path as below. It connects observations in original order. (geom_line would order by x value, which you also don't want). topo <- readOGR("public.geojson.json", layer ="OGRGeoJSON") topo <- spTransform(topo, CRS("+init=epsg:31983")) class(topo) #[1] ...


4

You can not change the content of pre-renderd tiles. Since there seems to be no tile server with english labelling worldwide, you have to do it on your own: Render the tiles using the Mapnik toolchain or Maperitive using the name:en field instead of the name field for labelling. Add them with the TileLayer plugin to your project. Using the QuickOSM plugin, ...


3

If you are looking for an interactive graphical view, mapview is the right choice. Use ## load packages library(raster) library(mapview) ## download data esp <- getData(country = "COL", level = 1) ## interactive plot mapview(esp) to display clickable polygons with a popup window showing you all the attribute values associated with a particular ...


3

If you can install Qgis in you computer, with the leaflet plugin you only need to do just load your layers into the software and export them with the leaflet plugin. Here is a useful tutorial: http://www.qgistutorials.com/de/docs/leaflet_maps_with_qgis2leaf.html It will work on local file system (bear in mind, this will generate a static map, if you update ...


3

Yes. Data Driven Pages were introduced at ArcGIS Desktop 10.0: Data Driven Pages allow you to quickly and easily create a series of layout pages from a single map document. A feature layer, or index layer, divides the map into sections based on each index feature in the layer and generates one page per index feature. arcpy.mapping was also ...


3

You are creating a new empty graphics layer gl but when you then call map.removeLayer(gl) it won't do anything as that new empty layer hasn't been added to the map yet. I'm guessing you wanted to remove the graphics layer previously created. You could do this giving the graphics layer a specific id when you create it, and then retrieving that existing ...


3

Take a look at OpenRouteService.org. This OSM-based routing engine has a heavy vehicle profile, where you can specify dimension limitations (e.g., length, width, height, weight) or load characteristics (e.g., hazardous materials) of a heavy vehicle. The API is described on the wiki.


3

The problem is you are assigning metadata to the object, and probably even overwriting the existing metadata. This happens here: projection(pr) <- mycrs You should first run this to see what raster thinks it is already: projection(pr) or just print the object out to get a fully summary: pr Going out on a limb, I think you should warp this ...


3

The best way to get boundaries of countries, provinces and regions is to use the OSM Boundaries application: https://osm.wno-edv-service.de/boundaries/ Extracting boundaries from generic tools like Overpass Turbo is not always easy, as the boundaries may contain errors and are likely complex multipolygons consisting of many parts. The OSM Boundaries ...


2

Although it is quite a long-winded approach, I came up with a solution which allows the user to display red-green-blue 'RasterStack' objects created from the initial 'ggmap' object using ggplot. But first things first, here is what I did. First of all, I forked the read-only mirror of ggmap hosted on GitHub and, in order to retain the original source code, ...


2

Here's a simple tutorial: A Web Map Service (WMS) is a web service that supplies georeferenced images to a client (viewer). The service supplies images based on a request that specifies, the dimensions, the coordinate reference system, the data, the output format and other criteria as required. The client builds a request based on information that is ...


2

So far I have found only one fairly decent looking workaround: The packcircles R package may have been designed for another purpose, but it does a nice job pushing the points away from each other (also see corresponding blog post). I might not understand all of the inner workings of this package, but luckily, as you will find, the example file from the ...


2

If you open the layer properties dialog and navigate to Labels -> Rendering there should be an option that reads "Merge connected lines to avoid duplicate labels". This has usually helped me in the past. However, I've still had times where the labels were still not cleaned up enough. I tend to store my data in PostGIS so in these cases I write a view which ...


2

One particular example which takes into consideration size as well as cultural and social relevance is this map of Detroit which has made the rounds for several years: In this example, we cast our doubts about projections aside, and can focus on the meaning. In the case of Detroit - just how big is it? We all know how big the cities of Boston, New ...


2

If you are creating similar maps for different regions, you could create an atlas in the print composer, and use presets to control which layers are shown for each region, if these will need to change. You can then very quickly copy & paste styles between your styled layers and the new additions. Even if you need to export the map for each region as an ...


2

If you reproject a raster with labels, you will obviously get squeezed labels. The only way to avoid this is to render the raster from vector data directly into the desired projection. You might want to look into mapnik, tilemill or maperitive to do this from Openstreetmap raw data (which is vector data). The R openstreetmap package only offers raster ...


2

If you intent to create a derivative database then you have to share parts of your work. For more information read the Legal FAQ, especially section 3. And ideally contact your lawyer.


2

Issue resolved. Make sure Google Maps is not in 'Lite Mode'. If it is, switch to 'full Google Maps' using the lightning bolt button at the bottom of the maps window.


2

No, not having any issues with Google Maps, including Hybrid. Maybe you could try using the current version of the API from Google's SVN? <script type="text/javascript" src="http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js"></script>


2

If you are using the basemap from CartoDB there is no way you can snap the street lines on the grid. But if you have shapefiles for the streetlines, you can edit them in another software called QGIS (free open software). Then, export that data onto CartoDB.


2

I wrote some Python scripts awhile back that pull from flight aware. You need to already know the airport or flight number. https://github.com/khibma/FlightAwareRest These calls cost $$$, so you need to make an account with them and provide a credit card (to obtain an api key). It's not real costly for a few flights, but I'm not sure how many you need to ...


2

It's free but you will have "only" 50,000 map views / mo, or 50,000 mobile users / mo More infos here: https://www.mapbox.com/pricing/#


2

The easiest way to get OpenStreetMap extracts would probably be through Mapzen's Metro Extracts tool here I would suggest exporting it in GeoJSON, then using a tool like ogr2gre (there's an online version here) to convert it to KML. You may also be interested in looking at Overpass Turbo for exporting data from OpenStreetMap.


2

Download administrative boundaries of the spain and portugal from in .shp format from http://www.gadm.org/ you can import the shapefiles into QGIS or another software the filter with query builder to isolate the regions you are interested in QGIS you can install openlayer plugin from the vectors tab select- openstreetmap then select download data points, ...


2

Instead of creating a convex hull over a set of points with the same attributes, create a Voronoi tesselation of all points, then merge the Voronoi polygons of those points with the same attributes. There are lots of ways to process the information you may have, and what I just said is one idea on how to do it. Voronoi + merge might create multipolygons, ...



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