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0

This looks indeed like some sort of missing value (as suggested by @Spacedman). Anyway, as a straightforward alternative to subsetting your data (as suggested by @nebi), you could simply use the zcol argument inside spplot to display only a desired range of values. Here is a reproducible example. library(raster) rst <- raster(volcano) ## no 'zlim' ...


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Download administrative boundaries of the spain and portugal from in .shp format from http://www.gadm.org/ you can import the shapefiles into QGIS or another software the filter with query builder to isolate the regions you are interested in QGIS you can install openlayer plugin from the vectors tab select- openstreetmap then select download data points, ...


2

The best way to get boundaries of countries, provinces and regions is to use the OSM Boundaries application: https://osm.wno-edv-service.de/boundaries/ Extracting boundaries from generic tools like Overpass Turbo is not always easy, as the boundaries may contain errors and are likely complex multipolygons consisting of many parts. The OSM Boundaries ...


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You could download data directly from Openstreetmap as .osm file, and convert it in QGIS as .kml, since QGIS supports export data as .kml. Alternatively, you could download data from Geofabrik (also openstreeet map data, but country by country, as .gbd/mdb, and in ArcMap, export it as .kml. Also, I would suggest you to use, if you have, shapefiles od Spain ...


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The easiest way to get OpenStreetMap extracts would probably be through Mapzen's Metro Extracts tool here I would suggest exporting it in GeoJSON, then using a tool like ogr2gre (there's an online version here) to convert it to KML. You may also be interested in looking at Overpass Turbo for exporting data from OpenStreetMap.


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Spacedman ist probably right but you could subset your dataframe before plotting like: df <- df[df$Z < 300,] spplot(df, "Z")


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Extending on @Spacedman's answer, creating a stacked map like the one shown in the question becomes quite simple. You just need to add another map layer and displace its y axis: e.g. aes(x=x, y=y+5) : ggplot(data= ofort) + geom_polygon( aes(x=x, y=y, group=id), fill= "white", color="gray30") + # layer 1 geom_polygon( aes(x=x, y=y+5, group=id, ...


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It's free but you will have "only" 50,000 map views / mo, or 50,000 mobile users / mo More infos here: https://www.mapbox.com/pricing/#


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The examples in your link look like the coordinates have been transformed via a shear and a scale matrix. You can easily apply this to the coordinates you get from the usual fortify/join data that ggplot requires. Need a unique character ID value: oregon.tract$id=as.character(1:nrow(oregon.tract)) Fortify on that ID and join attribute data: ofort = ...


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As per my comments, I would recommend having a look at the ArcGIS Runtime SDK for iOS, it supports fully offline routing and geocoding. Here is a sample from their GitHub page. They have samples in both Swift and Objective-C. You will have to build the public transportation network yourself, but maybe you can find shapefiles/feature classes on line for the ...


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You can not change the content of pre-renderd tiles. Since there seems to be no tile server with english labelling worldwide, you have to do it on your own: Render the tiles using the Mapnik toolchain or Maperitive using the name:en field instead of the name field for labelling. Add them with the TileLayer plugin to your project. Using the QuickOSM plugin, ...



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