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A solution without ArcSDE that must be implemented within ArcGIS Desktop will need to provide custom python-scripted change detection, conflict resolution (if desired) and geodatabase synchronization. You can start out with a script such as this and expand it. This will detect your changes and export them as delta tables. You can try to reverse engineer ...


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Convert your .ascii to a raster by using the the ASCII To Raster GP tool. Merge multiple rasters with the raster calculator (Spatial Analyst).


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Your question does not have a lot of details so I am assuming that you are looking for something introductory on this topic. I recommend reading up on Geodatabase Versioning and Replication.


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Should be simple. You have this: And you need to get this: Just: Add the attributes from tables 2 and 3 to table 1 Delete tables 2 and 3 Make connections to Table 1 Here's a short movie demo: http://screencast.com/t/0zKOWIrstTtG


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To copy shapefiles from multiple folders into a single geodatabase, you could do this: import arcpy import os ws = #path to input folder dst = #path to output geodatabase for dirpath, dirnames, filenames in arcpy.da.Walk(ws,datatype="FeatureClass"): for file in filenames: print file filepath = os.path.join(dirpath,file) outpath = ...


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I got this to work. But thank you to everyone who answered and their awesome ideas! I'll explore each of them. I used Global Mapper which has the option to search directories and its sub-directories for selected file types (File > Open all files in a directory tree). It took around 12 hours to load the shapefiles from 50,000 sub-folders and then I selected ...


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I advise merging your shapefiles into a single folder (using a program or search/copy/paste or a small script such as the one Mark C recommends in the comments). Then use this rather elegant bit of code from gis-programming.com: as above, use: ogr2ogr merge.shp file1.shp to create a shapefile merge containing the data of file1 then: for %f in ...


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Takes effing forever, but QGis's dissolve tool does work. I'm not sure why it takes so damn long, but you can dissolve everything in your layer via the "--Dissolve all--" option. Adding a spatial index or something might help I dunno but this option takes forever running inside of qgis before: after (10 minutes later on a very fast mac): And to ...


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I had the same problem today.It turns out that ESRI sample that you used is wrong. they used for fd in arcpy.ListDatasets("*", "CAD"): but "CAD" is wrong, is not a valid feature type for this tool - remove it and the script will work, or use "*.dwg".


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Here is how I would do it: import arcpy, os, sys # set your parameters input and output database InDB = sys.argv[1] OutDB = sys.argv[2] if not os.path.exists(OutDB): DBpath = os.path.dirname(OutDB) DBname = os.path.basename(OutDB) name,ext = os.path.splitext(DBname) if ext.upper() == ".MDB": arcpy.AddMessage("Creating output ...



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