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I managed to fix the problem using Editor -> More Editing Tools -> Advanced Editing -> Explode Multipart Features


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This would be a two or three step process. First dissolve all lines into a single feature (do not indicate a dissolve field). Next, split lines at points using your station feature class as the point input. You may then need to perform a multipart to singlepart as a final step.


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This is comment, but comments box is too small. Are you able to make end points and delete spatial duplicates? The answer should be yes, because ArcGis has this tools. Are you able to assign nodes IDs to lines? Answer should be yes, there are multiple posts, e.g. Assign point IDs to respective start and end attributes of a polyline Thus your question ...


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You could just give all lines a common attribute value, use dissolve to merge them, then use split-lines-at-points to recreate the segments between the red points.


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if the feature that need to be merged have a common attribute value (or if they all need to be merged), then you can use the dissolve tool (exists both in ArcGIS Data management -> Generalization -> Dissolve) and QGIS vector ->geoprocessing tools --> dissolve). In ArcGIS, there is an option to create (or not) multipart polygons. In QGIS you get multipart ...


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You could use the arcpy.Geometry() object's .union() method: >>> g1, g2 = [f[0] for f in arcpy.da.SearchCursor("BufferedPoints","SHAPE@")] >>> g1 <Polygon object at 0x1929f830[0x1929f920]> >>> g2 <Polygon object at 0x1929f730[0x1929f440]> >>> g3 = g1.union(g2) >>> ...


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This will get the job done with ArcGIS (most likely can be done with shorter/better code): import os, arcpy from datetime import datetime, time print "Running script..." arcpy.env.outputCoordinateSystem = r"D:\Projektionsfiler\SWEREF99TM.prj" arcpy.env.geographicTransformations = "SWEREF99_To_WGS_1984_1" #workspaces arbetsmapp = r'D:\S2' utdatamapp = ...


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Demo solution with OpenJUMP Original polygons Buffer the polygons so much that they overlap and make a union. This can be done as a single operation with OpenJUMP. Flat end cap and mitre join with quite a high limit are good settings. The gaps between the polygons have disappeared but the union is too large. Use negative buffer for the union and ...


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Not an answer as such, but a couple of tips. You can merge all files in a directory if you check the 'use input directory instead of files' option in the Merge dialog. I do this all the time for OS open data, which comes in folders with 100 images each. If you're having problems calling Merge from QGIS, I suggest you fill in the merge dialog, but don't ...


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The tutorial in the answer posted by Venug uses the Raster > Miscellaneous > Merge functionality. What I don't like about that method is that it requires you to find the files you want to merge in your file system. This can be tedious in a directory with hundreds of files. I prefer to use the Processing tools, which use the layers as inputs. Here I have an ...


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I hope below link will help you to complete the task as you want.. http://www.qgistutorials.com/en/docs/raster_mosaicing_and_clipping.html


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If you don't have to work in an ESRI workflow you can try the gdal merge tool from the GDAL toolset (http://www.gdal.org/gdal_merge.html). I'm pretty sure this will allow you to use floating point numbers for your resolution. I've had trouble with this tool if you are using very large rasters but if they aren't too large it can work well.


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Were the original pre-merge lines all pointing in a sea to source direction? If not then merging multiple lines flowing in opposite directions will cause the problem you are seeing. The solution is before you merge, you flip the lines that need flipping so they all flow from a source to sea direction.


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Here is a step-wise process. Queries were made with Spatialite-gui and visualizations with OpenJUMP. Take some points into table "points" with an attribute "radius". Buffer points by taking the radius from an attribute with SQL CREATE TABLE "buffers" AS SELECT ST_Buffer("geometry", "radius") as geometry FROM points; Union the buffer areas with SQL ...


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You could to use Dissolve Tool But, perhaps you could to create a buffer using the parameter: Dissolve result=YES


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In SQL, it is an aggregation query. You can do something like: Select st_Union(geom) from your_table group by the_attribute_which_make_each_group


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In QGIS you'd use the merge shapefiles function, just be sure to choose the correct couples/triplets/whatever. From the program menu, Vector -> Data management tools -> merge shapefiles


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Assuming there is a common field between them all: Merge all the feature classes together into one feature class Dissolve the feature class based on the identifier field. This will result in a multi-point feature class with each entry comprised of multiple locations Run feature to point to collapse the multipoint to point


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If you're using ogr2ogr to load data, you can simply apply the append tag. -append Other than that it will depend on the solution you are using. The more common solutions for loading MasterMap data are: Go Loader FME


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Layer stacking is a process for combining multiple images into a single image. In order to do that the images should have the same extent (number of rows and number of columns), which means you will need to resample other bands which have different spatial resolution to the target resolution. In other words, all images/bands should have same spatial ...



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