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1

The method to do this would be: Union county layer with jurisdiction (this will take care of those jurisdictions that overlap multiple counties) Convert those unioned jurisdiction features to a centroid layer, use the Feature to Point tool. Spatial join county layer with centroid layer Export table to xls or csv


0

Since you're exporting to spreadsheet anyway, I'd convert the Jurisdiction dataset to centroids and then spatial join to the County polys. Each point would collect the county name that it fell within. Export the centroids to spreadsheet.


3

Here you go. A couple of utility functions and then the meat in one function (and no for loops :)) islines <- function(g1, g2){ ## return TRUE if geometries intersect as lines, not points inherits(gIntersection(g1,g2),"SpatialLines") } sections <- function(sl){ ## union and merge and disaggregate to make a ## set of non-overlapping ...


1

Quite easy with command line gdalbuildvrt http://www.gdal.org/gdalbuildvrt.html and gdal_translate http://www.gdal.org/gdal_translate.html. gdalbuildvrt average.vrt *average*.tif gdal_translate of GTiff -co tiled=yes average.vrt average_mosaic.tif


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You can copy the following script to your QGIS (Processing Toolbox > Scripts > Tools > Create new script). This script takes rasters from a single folder called "Test" on the Desktop and merges all "...average.tif" files and all "...maximum.tif" files. It then places the output rasters into the "Results" subfolder: ##Merge_Rasters=name import os, glob ...


3

Reason is probably in accuracy of numeric computing. Removing the last decimal from the Y coordinate of the connecting points is enough for making the query to return LINESTRING SELECT ST_AsText(ST_LineMerge( ST_GeomFromText('MULTILINESTRING( (-70.52570888 -33.48112668,-70.52552472 -33.4811641), (-70.52552472 -33.4811641,-70.52453208 ...


2

There is no single transformer for this. Instead you must use a combination of transformers. First, a NeighborFinder, setting the "Maximum Distance" to whatever you want the search distance to be. Pipe the points into one input, and the Polygons into the other; I don't believe in this case it should matter which. Enter a name for "Close Candidate List ...


0

OK, I see you revised your question a bit. This script should get you most of the way there. The script will take a list of shapefiles and if there are more than 1 found in the list, it will buffer each shapefile and do a merge. If only one is found, it will only do the buffer. Just put in your own list of shapefiles in the main function. import arcpy ...



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