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9

Note there are two ways of doing this. The way you are going about doing it is the long way but that is the way I am going to show how to do it here. The other way is by just going to Add Vector Layer and then selecting file and then browsing to where your .mdb file is located and opening the .mdb file. First, you need to make sure QGIS 32 bit version is ...


7

I think you should take into account that personal geodatabase is created and accessed through ESRI clients, following proprietary patterns. MsAccess is not a spatial database on its own (it does not provide a spatial data model, so obviously no spatial data loading capabilities, spatial indexing or extended spatial SQL), so ESRI manages spatial information ...


7

Check it with odbc and search if database contain table starting with GDB_ import pyodbc db_file = "C:/path/to/my/database/MyDataBase.mdb" user = '' password = '' odbc_conn_str = 'DRIVER={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb)};DBQ=%s;UID=%s;PWD=%s' % \ (db_file, user, password) cnxn = pyodbc.connect(odbc_conn_str) cursor = cnxn.cursor() if ...


6

Your best bet is to keep your geometry in shapefiles and keep the data in access. Just make sure there is a common ID in both tables. Both QGIS and Mapinfo support joining shapes to database features (eg accessed via odbc). In Mapinfo, check the function "geocode".


6

It's possible to connect via ODBC. In windows, start the ODBC Administrator and define your Datasource (Microsoft Access Driver). In QGIS go to Layer/Add Layer/Vector Layer/database: Type=ODBC. Set up a new Connection. Host should be "localhost" if your database is local on your machine. Database Name is the same name you defined before in the ODBC ...


6

Personal geodatabases--really anything with Access--have a ton of limitations. File geodatabases permit up to 65,534 fields per table/feature class. It should be no problem to import your existing data to a file geodatabase and then make the changes/additions that you need.


5

Keep in mind that QGIS 1.8 on Windows supports .mdb under Layer->Add Vector Layer...->Browse->and change the file type in the drop-down to the right of the "File name"" form field. But.... QGIS 1.8 on OSX does not support opening of .mdb's (afaict)


5

You could probably migrate your data out of the Personal Geodatabase and directly into PostGIS using ogr2ogr, which supports both Personal Geodatabase and PostGIS file formats.


5

While I am still interested in hearing if there are other options available, I did come across a message post that mentioned this was possible using the eVis Plugin. The documentation describes in the Database Connection section how you can connect to an MS Access or ODBC connection to create XY point locations from the database, without creating a static ...


5

Caveat: I've not tried this, so I'm willing to bow to anyone with direct experience. You can connect to an ODBC datasource in the "add vector layer" dialog, just select "database" as the source type and ODBC as the database type. QGIS uses the ODBC driver for OGR, so the same caveats will apply - that is you will need a table called GEOMETRY_COLUMNS and so ...


5

To save yourself a bit of code you could use the geoprocessor and call DataManagementTools.CopyRows. See also: How to run a geoprocessing tool e.g.: // Create the geoprocessor. Geoprocessor GP = new Geoprocessor(); // Create the tool process object. ESRI.ArcGIS.DataManagementTools.CopyRows copyrowsTool = new ...


5

The ArcGIS 10.1 Help indicates you cannot edit the attributes of Excel or MS Access files, added through an Ole DB connection, because they have no ObjectID field. You can Copy the data to a fGDB table and then edit it. Or you can script Python to edit the native MS formats.


4

Try the install Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) 2.8 SP1 http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?familyid=78cac895-efc2-4f8e-a9e0-3a1afbd5922e&displaylang=en


4

With version 10 you need to explicitly initialize the license for the software; so that it knows what level to look for and what to check out. You can see the support doc to get you started. So you will want to have in your form a string to activate your license; then when you dispose of the form to return the license.This .Net sample gives you the major ...


4

I assume you are talking about manipulating an active ArcMap session from outside the application boundary. To do this you need to use IAppROT to get a reference to the specific ArcMap application instance you want to manipulate. From there you can access its document, active view, map, etc. and manipulate them as needed (see @artwork21's answer). Just be ...


4

If you're looking to get your data into an access database you could skip the middle conversion step entirely (or rather have ArcGIS handle it for you) by transferring your data to a personal geodatabase, which in reality is an access database. From ArcGIS you can use the Create Personal Geodatabase tool to create the access database, and then you should be ...


4

You can do both, kinda. If you wanted, which would be a good thing to do, make a Personal Geodatabase (which is a MS Access DB). This will allow you to store all the spatial data and any tabular data in one DB. You will also be able to access the tables in MS Access. There are limitations, the ones imposed by MS Access; a large one being the 2GB size ...


4

Postgres configuration By default the Postgres server is only accessible from the same computer it runs on. You need to setup the Postgres server to listen not just locally, but on your internet facing network card too. This is done in the postgresql.conf configuration file. You will also need to enable user authentication from the outside, which is done ...


3

More than likely you are viewing the default version with odbc and an edit version through arc. Try reconcile version through arcgis tools.


3

WARN: it seems the 'Join Attributes' function ha been removed from fTools 0.6.2, solution for me was to downgrade to 0.6.1. You can use QGIS to perform the operation you want, please proceed as follows: if not installed already, install Quantum GIS (an Open Source desktop GIS) and then install fTools as described here export the mdb table or query into ...


3

You should be able to use the AccessWorkspaceFactory co-class even though it's not a personal geodatabase. You could also use ADO.NET. I am not sure why your code isn't working but I do know that working with property sets is an exercise in frustration.


3

Esri's online help (see two links below as examples) discourages users from opening Personal Geodatabases stored in Microsoft Access using Access so I think your phrase "futile because pgdb technology is proprietary and no detailed publicly available knowledge exists" probably sums it up. http://support.esri.com/es/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/31599 ...


3

MS Access is not able to do spatial operations, at least not in the way those used to using OGR standard spatial databases may be familiar with. Functions such as ST_Within, ST_Intersects and the dedicated geometry types simply don't exist. Now, that's not to say that you can't work with co-ordinate values, but you'll have to treat them as normal decimal / ...


3

MS Access doesn't know what an SDE feature class is, so you don't need to do anything special to connect to a "spatial" database. Feature class attributes are conveniently stored in tables that match the name of the feature class. You can directly connect to the underlying SQL database and work with the tables. However, beware of adding new rows or making ...


3

With the new "Processing" tools available in QGIS 2, this becomes a bit easier. While I have still not found a way to "live-link" the data (so that if you change the values in the MS Access table, the point moves automatically), this method seems to work pretty well. Credit goes to "Christina" and "Bernd" in the comments section of this page (and of course ...


3

an alternative approach would be to move the data to postgis. you can read the csv-file directly with the postgresql copy-command. then you can create points fom the xy-fields. then if you want to use some reports or other funtionality in access you can connect to postgis from access. the benefit would be that you put the spatial data where it belongs, in ...


3

If your mdb table has a shape field it should already be esri data. Does it contain an OID, FID or GUID as well? Edit: > Yes OBJECTID is the one I forgot to put in the list. If you view the db in arccatalog you should see icons for the tables that have geodata in them. Other tables will have a table icon. My example shows the table icons first, then ...


3

If you're interested in PostGIS, you might want to visit the BostonGIS website. They have great material to get you started. You can also start with OpenGeo's introduction to PostGIS workshop. PostGIS has a shapefile importer that you can use to load your shape files. As for your accdb files, you might want to convert them to SQL first. Bullzip has this ...


3

Try using the setValue(fieldName, object) method with your field name variable.


3

If I have this correct -- biggest constraint is that you must use the local municipal data as the geocoding reference data. This wasn't clear in your original question. I'll give you the ArcGIS answer -- since that is available to you and what I know. You need to create a ArcGIS locator from the municipal data, i.e. the reference data. This is your ...



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