Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

A network dataset must reside within a feature dataset. A feature dataset can be created in either a file geodatabase (folder.gdb) or a personal geodatabase (filename.mdb). You can't create one in a shapefile, if that's what you mean by 'normal'. Note you'll need to add the street layer to the network dataset in order to build a network from it, and there ...


0

My first suggestion would be to investigate the geometries involved. Note that snapping is not enough - the layers must be coincident, meaning in order for a network junction to occur there must be a vertex at the same point in all related layers. You can't just snap the stop points anywhere along a route segment/edge (nor for that matter will a junction ...


4

Network Analyst is an ArcGIS extension which can be accessed either through a Desktop application such ArcMap (for manual GIS routing analysis) or as a web service when exposed as an ArcGIS Server service. There are multiple approaches to expose the drive-time analysis service (by the way, the drive-time analysis is also called a "service area" in Esri ...


0

Common problems I have had include break in the network, as mentioned before. You can fix this with the Integrate GP tool - but read up on the tool because you have to set the tolerance right. You also have to make sure that you have nodes at all road intersections. The "Planarize Lines" tool under "Advanced editing" will split all your roads at their ...


1

Using VRP solver will help you solving this problem. The Closest Facility solver will only let you define two input point classes (Facilities and Incidents), so there is no way to define your first responders (C class). Check the VRP help page and try to figure out how you can define your classes based on what VRP can offer. You can of course use Route ...


4

Since you are on ArcGIS, here it goes.. Skills: I suggest starting with learning basics of Network Analyst (further NA). It is impossible to get started preparing the data for network analysis withouth understanding of the basics of the GIS routing and network analysis theory (graphs, edges, junctions, cost, algorithms). Industry: a good place to start is ...


1

To my knowledge there are no specific rules or guidelines for setting a speed limit based solely on surface type. Road geometry and access points are generally more important factors. Surface type might be a more heavily weighted factor in some cases, such as if dust is a concern in a residential area, but I've never seen a case where a specific speed limit ...



Top 50 recent answers are included