Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

To process large files, you need to use a generator which only read/write one line at a time and Python has a command that does that: with. The with statement handles opening and closing the file, including if an exception is raised in the inner block. The for line in f treats the file object f as an iterable, which automatically uses buffered IO and ...


2

potentially a multi-part question - 1) plotting grids with legends, 2) including shape files on grid, and 3) animate output images. each with multiple opportunities to accomplish the task. here's a quick run-down of at least 2-methods: using gdal, one should be able to read in the raster - perhaps something like (in a loop to get all rasters). raster = ...


2

If you are using Linux, you should be able to connect to a WFS server, and fetch a layer without any problem with wget. I was able to fetch a dataset consisting of 10209 features, which was 33.3 MB in size. My test command was the following: wget -O output.gml ...


2

You could try the OGR WFS option "-dsco OGR_WFS_PAGING_ALLOWED=ON" as described in the docs http://www.gdal.org/drv_wfs.html


1

In R: library(raster) library(animation) files <- list.files("path/to/asc", pattern = "asc$") saveHTML({ for (i in seq_along(files)) { r <- raster(files[i]) r <- plot(r) ## include additions like counties here } }) The animation package has other options for different output formats rather than HTML. The raster package has ...


1

GDAL supports the use of SQL for all datasources and especially the SQLite dialect http://www.gdal.org/ogr_sql_sqlite.html is quite powerful. This should work for you: ogrinfo -dialect sqlite -sql "select LineNo, StationNo, count(*) from your_layer_name group by LineNo, StationNo order by 1,2" your_tab_file



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible