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I have been using three different programs for that: AirPhotoSE, VSfm and OpenDroneMap. All of them are easy to work, specially if default values give good results for your pictures. AirPhotoSE is the slowest one (it is an old project that it is not active yet), but it works well and gives good results, both for orthophotos and point-clouds (and even ...


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No, do not load the imagery into PostGIS. You want to load the image catalogue into PostGIS and use the JDBC image mosaicking support in GeoServer to read the mosaics using the database catalogue. That was you can easily update which images participate in your mosaics via the catalogue in the database, while not incurring the performance penalties of storing ...


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This depends on what exactly you want to do in GIS. I'm in pretty much the same situation: learned to use ArcGIS 10.x (currently 10.3) at university and searching for a free of charge software I could use next year when I graduate. I started using QGIS a year ago and was able to fulfill most of the tasks I usually completed in ArcMap before. Maybe you want ...


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I would start with QGIS. The interface is somewhat similar to ArcGIS, most of the functionality is there either in the main program, or with add-ins. There is an active development road map, and there are frequent, productive, and sometimes profound updates. Much of the functionality found in Grass, and Saga, can be found in QGIS with the processing toolbox. ...


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Since none of the posters have mentioned it yet, there is also software to help you put your point clouds on a website (check SceneMark). You can do animations, simple measurements and use 3D models in your presentations. Or you can also produce nice videos based on your scanning data.



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