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If you export the lines as DXF, you should be able to load them into QGIS. Once they are in QGIS, you need to create an attribute that contains the elevation of each line (ie. a data column with a number). Depending on the total number of lines you could possibly do this manually. If doing it manually is not an option, you could concievably do some Python ...


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HDFview is geared for use with satellite data or climate model output that often comes in hierarchical data formats or netcdfs, but it's one of those things like a good text editor (ex. notepad++ or vim), where once you come across certain file types you need this tool to get a first look at them and understand how things are structured. It's not really ...


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Here is how you could get the slope, using R and the raster package. To (also) get the intercept see help(calc) library(raster) # your file # b <- brick("file.nc") # example data: b <- brick(system.file("external/rlogo.grd", package="raster")) # here time is 1 to n, but you can set it something else time <- 1:nlayers(b) # write a function that ...


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GDAL has support for netCDF files: gdalinfo --formats|grep -i cdf GMT (rw): GMT NetCDF Grid Format netCDF (rw+): Network Common Data Format So, you can open this kind of files directly in QGIS. For this page: http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/software/netcdf/examples/files.html I downloaded this ECMWF_ERA-40_subset.nc climate sample file. It has 17 multiband ...


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If you're familiar with Python you can use the netCDF4-python library that can read and write both netCDF 3 and 4 data to numpy arrays. For example: from netCDF4 import Dataset root_group = Dataset("path_to_dataset", format='NETCDF4') print root_group $ netCDF4 style dump data = root_group.variables["some_variable"][:] Python has a large number of ...


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osm2pgsql is surely designed to import the whole planet into postgis. You have to make sure to use a recent version of osm2pgsql, because the node numbers in OSM have hit a limit which made it necessary to change the number format from integer to long integer. Older versions of osm2pgsql will fail therefore. On windows, there are a few more pitfalls. You ...


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Maybe osmosis is the option you are looking for. You can use osmosis to import all tags into the postgis database. Since osmosis does not build GIS ready to use objects you must do this in a separate process using SQL. A very good collection to start with are the osmosis layers from moenk available on github.


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No, you don't need separate vector files for each zoom level. Of course they could speed things a little bit up but will also require much more storage space than using a single database for a specific area. However do note that PBF files are not suited for on-demand rendering. They are designed for efficiently storing OSM data, not for running queries on ...


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You can generate new cross sections using Hec-Ras, you draw a line like a center of your river then you need to use the coordinates of your cross sections (I used Covadis software to get them). this video expalin the process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlsTNNIi6Kc



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