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9

Even though the question is too broad, it is answerable in a general sense. In the Open Source world, there are many equivalent tools which can be used for a particular function. Which tool or application to use, would depend on you are your experience with it. I'm just giving the most popular tool or equivalent applications. web server: Any Web Server ...


7

If you are working on your workstation it's more a matter of taste. Knowing how to use psql is useful for some situations like running sql scripts from files, pipe it with other tools, etc. It depends on your needs. My everyday work is done using pgAdmin and I only go down to the CLI when needed. On the other hand psql is sometimes your only option when ...


4

Evil Genius seems to have a good idea, but actually the color-relief file can be set using percentages as well as min and max. So you could write the file using something like: 0% green 100% red So the command would be something like: gdaldem color-relief inputfile.img colorfile.txt output.jpg -of "JPEG2000"


3

You can use a number of GRASS tools to do the job. Just adding the data to a mapset in GRASS using v.in.ogr.qgis may be all you need to do. Using QGIS and GRASS: Overview: Open QGIS and make sure the GRASS plugin is turned on (Plugins|Manage...) and visible (View|Toolbars|GRASS). Add the layer to QGIS. Create a mapset in GRASS. Import the layer into GRASS ...


1

You say that you're open to using FME for this but don't want to run in a Windows environment. Good news, as of FME 2014, FME now runs on a Mac as a "technical preview". With FME, you can bypass many of your intermediate steps and go straight from DWG to Google Earth. I would have open a DWG reader and connect it to a Trimble Sketchup Writer. You can ...


1

Once you coverted the DWG to DXF you should be able to use GDAL/OGR. Note that you have to use DXF version 2000 (http://www.gdal.org/ogr/drv_dxf.html). I have recently used ogr2ogr with the -gcp (ground control point) option (http://www.gdal.org/ogr2ogr.html) successfully to geolocate DXFs. Thus, with ogr2ogr you can covert the DXF to Shapefile and ...


1

You could use the OTB applications : first rescale your data in 8 bit otbcli_Rescale -in input_image.tif -out intermediate_image.tif uchar -outmin 0 -outmax 255 then apply a colormap otbcli_ColorMapping -in intermediate_image.tif -method custom -method.custom.lut yourLUT.txt -out output_image.jpg your LUT should go from 0 0 255 0 to 255 ...


1

You could use the R "raster", "rasterVis" and "ggplot2" packages to automate this quite nicely. You have considerable control of very simple (just the raster) or customized plots using the R low-level plotting engine or higher level plotting like ggplot2. You can also easily call other plotting devices to output other formats including: tiff, bmp, png or ...


1

Look at GRASS GIS, MCDA in GRASS, and the addon module: r.mcda.ahp - generate a raster map classified with analytic hierarchy process (AHP) for GRASS 7 r.mcda.ahp - idem for for GRASS 6 The modules (r.mcda.electre, r.mcda.fuzzy, r.mcda.regime, r.mcda.roughset and r.mcda.ahp) are explained in MCDA-GIS integration: an application in GRASS GIS 6.4 (Massei ...


1

With multiprocessing, for fastness! Has a little different output-formatting. #!/usr/bin/python import gdal, ogr, osr, numpy, sys from multiprocessing import Pool # Raster dataset input_value_raster = sys.argv[1] # Vector dataset(zones) input_zone_polygon = sys.argv[2] # Open data rast = gdal.Open(input_value_raster) shp = ogr.Open(input_zone_polygon) ...



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