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OSM data is released under ODbL. In a nutshell you can do anything you like with the data as long as you attribute them. I am uncertain on SRTM data. I have always obtained it from USGS who have a similar citation policy.


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In case you haven't tried it yet, the pgRouting Workshop is always a good place to get started. When you used osm2po to convert your OSM data, then source and target attributes are already there and ready to use. Sometimes the vertices table, that contains all source and target ID's, is useful to find the nearest vertex from a geographic point. The osm2po ...


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AFAIK there is currently no API that offers such operator. You can use planet dumps and process it on your own by testing each POI node (or each building way) for checking the boundaries. Due to the amount of data, this can be pretty timeconsuming.


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AFAIK non of the current JS webmap toolkit support cartograms. The heavy load of vector transformation etc. might be a reason. If you need it live/interactive you might choose an heatmap instead. Otherwise you might want to give QGIS/R/... or other renderers a try to calculate/render an WMS layer and embedd it to Leaflet/OpenLayers.


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You can use a WMS GetFeatureInfo request to query for map feature attributes: Geoserver Tutorial OpenLayers Example


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In the OpenStreetMap plugin, you should see a "Symbolize OSM Data" tool (also present are "Symbolize Lines," "Symbolize Points," and "Symbolize Polygons." If you feed your line/point/poly feature classes into this tool it will add your data to the MXD (in a "Group" layer) in a pre-styled way where different features have different styles based on their osm ...


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Use GeoWebCache or Tilecache to generate your tiles. The Process is called Seeding .. You need to be aware of the different file storage schemas .. References: TileCache Seeding Discussion on the Tilecache Disk Format GeoWebCache Seeding There is also this process Exporting and extracting the tiles from TileMill That may suit as well .. ...


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Mapbox provides a gallery of their own stuff using tilestream: http://a.tiles.mapbox.com/v3/mapbox/maps.html I would also be interested to know if there are any sites for collections of third party basemaps.


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The default config reflects a standard car-routing-topo. Hence it should not take footways or sth. similar into account. finalMask=car means that only ways which are drivable will be included and converted. But be careful. Paths or tracks and even ferries may be tagged with motorcar=yes. This indicates an alternative potential type of transport for cars ...


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This isn't covered by the functionality of most webmap toolkits. Instead this is realized by the renderers who create the basemap that is embedded with Leaflet. Thus, you need to setup Mapnik, Maperitive, Mapbox, ... create a mapstyle that you want and deliver it to your endusers. Otherwise you might want to adapt existing style e.g. delivered by Cloudmade, ...


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I am familiar with the OSM plugin, however I mainly use the "Download, Extract, and Symbolize OSM Data" tool. When I use this, I enable "Extract OSM Tags into Standalone Attributes." The feature classes that are output have a large number of fields joined representing multiple attributes (most are Null), and I am able to label roads or other features using ...


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I get the same nasty effect if I load the data with Add vector layer using the ogr driver: <provider encoding="System">ogr</provider> Alternatively (and the preferred way) I can load the data with Add spatialite layer. The encoding line changes to: <provider encoding="System">spatialite</provider> which is wrong ...


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Ok, found at least one working solution. After finding that on Linux everything is fine suspected the default encoding in Windows. So I opened the QGIS project file (*.qgs) in PSPad and found this in layer description: <provider encoding="System">ogr</provider> So probably QGIS uses CP1250 encoding as default in Windows while the database is ...


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You can use Spatial Manager Desktop to import OSM data into PostGIS. Please, watch this post: http://www.spatialmanager.com/import-directly-postgis-databases/ There is a limited trial version ,you can download it here: http://www.spatialmanager.com/downloads/ If you need help on this feel free to tell me. Disclaimer: I work for Opencartis (Spatial Manager ...


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First, use https://mapzen.com/metro-extracts/ for more up to date data. Second, you seem to be loading a raw osm file, and not a shapefile. Please try the same with "osm2pgsql shp" or "imposm shp" file for your region.


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Thanks @Crhis W , I tried the angle system, and it really works! I computed the bearing for each line, coded each bearing as: NE - NW - SE - SW in another field. Then flipped it, if there was a -1 on its "one way" attribute field, and voilĂ , there you have!!. Here an example: All I need now is to know how to compare automatically. I have thought about ...


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I would start with TileMill, some excellent open source software. This will allow you to design maps, pulling data from shape files, postgis, etc, and render then via Mapnik to various different formats. TillMill is used by the OSM project for rendering their tiles. TillMill has a form of CSS for designing maps, called CartoCSS, and this is used to ...


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Depending on how confident you are with technical setups, rather than running local GeoServers, you could use something like TileMill to generate MBTiles files of all your images, or just the images using Invar. This can then be show by simple python code like TileStache. This would be a much lighter weight setup.


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For Openstreetmap, the parameters are quite simple: http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=10/47.1911/2.4884 http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map= : base url 10/ : zoom level 47.1911/ : latitude of center, North positive 2.4884 : longitude of center, East positive ...


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AFAIK there is currently no 'best practise' on how you organize the OSM data at your PostGIS backend. There are different database schemas that are tuned for specific purposes: rendering geospatial lookups / reverse geocoding fulltext search / gazetter ... If you have a very specific usecase, you might tweak the OSM importer mappings (e.g. at osmosis or ...


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one option is to download the osm data for the required country and view it uisng QGIS ... you might want to refer to this link .. How do I load OSM vector data in QGIS 2.x?


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Selfrendering for smaller regions is easy with maperitive. The result almost looks like original Openstreetmap tiles. For browsing, Openlayers is all you need. Instead of fetching online tiles, you can supply an adress on disk using file:///, or use a local apache server to use http://localhost. Qlandkarte is also able to load locally stored tiles using ...


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For the satellite tiles, you could render them yourself using Mapnik. Landsat and NAIP are two sources of free satellite raster data. edit: I've also just come across a growing dataset (also free) of High Resolution Orthoimagery, which I've never used, but is much higher detail than the other two sources.


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They are called diff updates. You have two options .. Apply the Diffs from PlanetOSM and then remove the imported geometry that are outside of your bounding box Use the Geofabrik Extracts for North America and apply the Geofabrik diffs which are updated daily. I do both, 3 minute diff updates for the planet and daily diff updates for the Philippines, in ...


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Your approach looks ok to me. On my local system, I skipped the TileCache part. Mapnik fills the folders in the way Openlayers reads them from disk using file:///... I don't know if leaflet can do it the same way. For the satellite tiles: You have no chance to get them legally. Google and bing do not like storing their tiles locally. If you have ...


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The term for what you want to do is incremental updating so I recommend that you look at the Osm2pgsql page where it says: osm2pgsql has two main modes of running - normal and slim mode. It is highly recommended to run osm2pgsql in slim mode. Some important features (including incremental updates (planet diffs, the initial load to populate the ...


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Well you can let it be created on the "public" schema and after: - ALTER TABLE IF EXISTS public.actions SET SCHEMA gis; - ALTER TABLE IF EXISTS public.schema_info SET SCHEMA gis; - ALTER TABLE IF EXISTS public.users SET SCHEMA gis; - ALTER TABLE IF EXISTS public.way_nodes SET SCHEMA gis; - ALTER TABLE IF EXISTS public.relations SET SCHEMA gis; - ...


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We provide a free OSM converter, which you can use to import OSM data into our routing solutions. Could be either RW NetServer 3 (standalone server application) or RW Net 4 (.NET component). Both can be seen on www.routeware.dk and provides standard features such as routing, driving directions, travelling salesman optimization etc.


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I usually do this using QGIS. I load the kml layer, save as shapefile and add the columns that are necessary for rendering. Then I open a connection to my postgis database, delete everything inside the current view, and copy-and-paste the kml data into the postgis layer. I have created a separate bboxdb inside postgis for such cases, so my original osm ...


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You have to expand the default.style of osm2pgsql to import the local name as well. The file is a simple text file, which you can edit with any text editor. You will find a line node,way name text linear inside. This will import only the international readable name. For local names, add node,way name:ja text linear ...


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pgRouting is another routing option using OpenStreetMap data. pgRouting.org pgRouting extends the PostGIS / PostgreSQL geospatial database to provide geospatial routing functionality. Core Features pgRouting provides functions for: All Pairs Shortest Path, Johnson’s Algorithm All Pairs Shortest Path, Floyd-Warshall Algorithm Shortest Path ...


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GraphHopper (using OpenStreetMap Data) GraphHopper offers memory efficient algorithms in Java for routing on graphs. E.g. Dijkstra and A* but also optimized road routing algorithms like Contraction Hierarchies. It stands under the Apache License and is build on a large test suite. OpenStreetMap is directly supported from GraphHopper. Without ...


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Looks like you need something like Osmosis or imposm. These are tools that will convert raw OSM data output by JOSM into a custom postgis format. Because OSM is free-tagging, there is no "official" way to convert the XML into a usable data structure that a GIS can read. The main importers currently focus on roads, buildings, points of interest etc. because ...


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Not that I'm aware of (although there may be some ways to automate the steps in that tutorial with a python script). If you wanted to go really high-tech (with a corresponding increase in the setup time) then you could setup a postgis database of the area you are interested in (with the tags you are interested in) using something like Osmosis or imposm and ...


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I created parser to modify the XML nodes I wanted to change. marked those nodes as changed. and saved as a new JSON XML file. Loaded the change XML and JSON happily uploaded it. it worked perfectly.


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I'm not having osmosis running on my machine right now so I'm not sure. However, you could try to remove the quotations marks from the highway values and simply seperate them with a comma. Furthermore, expand the "accept-nodes" part of your query with amenity=* and tourism=*.


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Since the update of the OSM plugin, all editing and uploading functions of the plugin are removed. The standard OSM editors have much better capabilities of editing and internal checking than QGIS can provide. The manual page you mentioned has been forgotten to be dropped. Maybe underdark can do something about that.


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Vivek, one issue you will have is for very long ways. Returning the OSMid for a long way will inhibit that whole way being used, rather than a possible simple route around the problem area. If your area is not huge, (city size) you may want to consider PG_Routing as you can dynamically update the routing tables for an individual segment based on a lat long ...


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Are you more interested in the data or the tool? I always use overpass api service as the query builder is more straightforward http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Overpass_API


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What you are looking for is called 'reverse geocoding' and is implemented e.g. with Nominatim API


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So, after following Carsten's suggestion from the comments, I could finally generate a routing database for the entire world. The catch was to use the tileSize command line argument from osm2po. The actual values that I used were java -Xmx8192m -jar osm2po-core-4.8.8-signed.jar prefix=world tileSize=10x10,1.0 planet-140430.osm.pbf in case you are wondering ...


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You might be able to extract some information or use Open Street Maps as a Base. Here you can search for some datasets through data.gov ArcGis provides street and highways at a certain resolution. A quick google search may yield you more results depending on what exactly you're looking for. But the above should serve you well! There may be other ...


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A russian mapper has made a tool for road network generalization, but it has three drawbacks: It's in Visual Basic. It reads and produces .mp files made with osm2mp. Documentation is in Russian. Sadly, @Mapper is right: there is no such general-purpose solution not only for OpenStreetMap data, but in general, for any open geodata format.


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There is a plugin for that: Leaflet.Terminator.


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I Finally found the relevant post from Paul Norman and Andre Joost on a similar Question .. What is occuring appears to be a somewhat subtle bug with osm2pgsql where osm2pgsql requires id-sorted nodes, but the API does not guarantee that. The easiest solution is to import with --slim --drop. The --slim flag causes osm2pgsql to use the database instead of ...


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It seems you encountered a strange bug inside the osm importer. It expects the nodes to be ordered, but they are not. Using QGIS, I get the same strange 4-node polygon using Add Vector layer from GDAL , but the Openstreetmap plugin does it right (i.e. it self-orders the nodes). It looks like osm2pgsql expects the nodes ordered as well, but the export ...


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I would definitely recommend going with the flow you're thinking of now (your geometries in CartoDB, your tiles in Mapbox, point to those tiles from CartoDB). The data problem is a big one! If you can, I would use the basic Mapbox map editor (web-based, not TileMill). There you are essentially styling Mapbox's data, so you don't have to think about that, ...


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No, you don't need a special apache module. You don't even need a webserver at all because you can just to open file:///C:/Profiles/ApachePHP/apache/www/mwork/maperitive_test1/index_leaf.html in your browser. The problem is your osmUrl. Either you have to make C:\Profiles\Maperitive\Tiles available through your webserver. Or you have to replace the URL with ...


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I fix the same issue on CentOS machine by installing proj-epsg package.


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The approach i've taken to this same problem was to show the 5 highest peaks in each tile at zooms < 14, and then show all above 14, which looks pretty good most of the time. This approach does assume that the content of the ele tag is valid, which it frequently is. If you need better elevations you could run some sort of script to lookup the elevations ...



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