New answers tagged

0

See the Readme about GeoJSON properties. The correct property name is height, not building:levels. building:levels is the corresponding tag in the OSM database but it is converted to a height property for the resulting GeoJSON data.


1

I got a really nice and fast answer by opening an issue on the barefoot repo. Please look at https://github.com/bmwcarit/barefoot/issues/13 The key was to look up the matching between the internal id and the osm id by execute a query. select gid,osm_id from bfmap_ways where gid=1; select tags from ways where id=99;


0

SUPPORT_LATLON | SUPPORT_EDGEFLAGS the default constructor sets SUPPORT_LATLON only. Other constructors must set the combination explicitly. The code above is a binary operation with Or-Op "|"


0

Mapzen geocoding service may be a good fit for you. "...Mapzen Search completely powered by open data, but it is available to everyone..."


1

Go to OSM website (http://www.openstreetmap.org), choose a BBOX and select export. When you take data from OSM you'll get just the data. You'll need to import it to your database/QGIS/Geoserver and apply some styles to see the data as seen in OSM map. I know nothing about matplotlib-basemap. To import the data to PostgreSQL you can use osm2pgsql: ...


3

Generally speaking, it is not recommended to upload Shapefiles to the OSM database. What you can do, is to use those shapefiles, as a base, to make edits which meet the topological requirements of OSM. Also note that copyright of these files should allow the usage of data in this way. To get more information on this, read this document on the OSM wiki: http:...


1

This process worked for me: http://ssrebelious.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/raster-extent-modification-using-qgis.html "In QGIS you can change extent of the rasters. Lets examine one of the worst case scenarios. There are two overlapping (one band) rasters A and B. Say, we need to add A values to B values and get the final image to have extent that will contain ...


1

Apart from using the full planet, you can download extracts in osm.pbf format from Geofabrik for certain regions. They contain all data within the region, while the shapefiles only contain some most-wanted topics. You can load the data into a Postgis database with osm2pgsql, or in a spatialite database with ogr2ogr. For use in QGIS, you can also try the ...


2

The OpenStreetMap Wiki is your friend: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Map_Features. You can also get a lot of good information from here: https://taginfo.openstreetmap.org/keys/addr:housenumber#combinations. You may need this: http://learnosm.org/en/osm-data/osmosis/ and this: https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Key:addr This command line was not ...


0

Please see the OSM Legal FAQ, especially paragraph 3d aka "If I use your data together with someone else's data, do I have to apply your license to their data too?". In the end it depends on whether you are creating a collective database or a derivative database. If in doubt, contact a lawyer.


0

OP here, I can now answer my own question thanks to Rainer Stuetz :) The call was made from behind a proxy, and without proper login / password. Therefore, the proxy returned an HTTP page instead of an XML one, which in turn could not be parsed as XML (obviously). You can diagnose the problem with a call to osmar:::get_osm_data.api(api, box). If it does ...


1

I don't think you have an obligation to publish your pothole data back to OSM, if that's what you mean. I also don't think you're under an obligation to make the pothole data open, though I think local residents would appreciate it if you did. Besides, if users can't see prior reports, you might get lots of duplicates reporting the same pothole again and ...


2

If you want to take OSM-Datas, I can recommend: http://download.geofabrik.de/north-america.html. When opening the data only import polyline file. To only have highways and on/off ramps search the attribute table. A detailed feature list of osm attributes can be found on: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Map_Features So do (just an example, dunno the ...


3

You should not have to do any particular conversion on your OSM data or Leaflet returned coordinates. There is a high confusion on this subject, but I think it comes down to a simple explanation: OSM data is in WGS84 datum (EPSG 4326). This is how you plot the Earth onto an ellipsoid. Web Mercator (EPSG 3857) is how you project this ellipsoid onto a plane....


0

QGIS should fit your needs. Using QGIS plus OpenStreetMap Plugins by choice, you can eazily create your basic canvas or the target area. Furthermore adding the TimeManager-Plugin, you can add your military action and even animate it video alike.


0

Specifically answering the question you could use osm2pgsql to get the open street map into postgres. From here you can use postgres to shape command line pgsql2shp Bare in mind - TileMill is going to generate a rastered image map tile / not a vector. Using the original protocol buffer format / pbf is a better place to start and then you can apply ...


0

Okay so I found an easy way to do this for anyone interested. Get the bounding box of the Geotif using the command line utility gdalinfo Use osmconvert -b"bottom_left_lat","bottom_left_long","top_left_lat","top_left_long" to extract the geotiff Enjoy your cropped OSM file!


2

A bit late but there is another candidate. The Routing API of the GraphHopper Directions API has an optimize=true parameter and supports several dozens of locations (dependent on the purchased package). And with the Route Optimization API you can solve a lot more complex problems with time windows, capacity restrictions, multiple vehicles etc Disclaimer: I'...


0

Load both the TIGER data and the OSM data into the same PostGIS enabled database (I would suggest different schemas). Use the TIGER data to locate the road/address and then use its geometry to find the nearest road (by geometry) in the OSM data and display its 'access'. SELECT access from public.osm_roads order by geom <-> (select st_setsrid(geom,...


0

Maybe you can find the solution via the is_in parameter of overpass-api? see these postings: http://forum.openstreetmap.org/viewtopic.php?id=29128 http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Overpass_API/Overpass_QL#Query_for_areas_.28is_in.29]2 https://help.openstreetmap.org/questions/48088/what-makes-a-closed-way-show-up-as-an-enclosing-feature-with-query-...


2

I run a few internal OSM servers. There are a few things that can cause connection issues, but usually it is just a matter of the URL. First, I assume you're not running https on your local server, so you will need to change that. I don't think the servers run on the http port (80) by default. If not, you need to specify whichever port you're using that on ...


2

As far as the projections are concerned, this answer explains it really well. Once you have the coordinates in either EPSG:4326 or EPSG:3857 you should be able to covert them fairly easily, using either PostgreSQL or online convertors like this one. Getting the actual coordinates of a place or point in GoogleMaps is as simple as just clicking on the map. ...


-2

I just use the wrong coordinate system. The right is UTM 32N!


1

You can have a closer look at tools like osmosis or even better, faster, easier and smaller: osmfilter Read instructions in the OSM wiki how to filter data types like nodes, ways or relations, by key or by value. Maybe you can get a result file that can be imported in any database much faster.


0

Found it: osmosis --read-pbf south-america-latest.osm.pbf --tag-filter accept-nodes seamark:type=* --write-xml seamarks.osm


1

Try making adding a new field with a long int as the data type. Right click on the new field and select Calculate Geometry Choose the option (length in meters) select a segment and use the measure tool to make sure it is the same length as it shows in the attribute table.



Top 50 recent answers are included